Archives of Asian Art, vol. 62 (2012)

AAA 62 coverThe table of contents below contains links to the MUSE edition of each article and shows either an abstract or a sample image from each of the main entries.

Updates on Archives of Asian Art
Stanley K. Abe, iv

Behind the Scenes at Archives: An Appreciation of Naomi Noble Richard
Marsha Haufler and John M. Rosenfield, 1

Foreword to James Cahill article
Jerome Silbergeld, 5

Xieyi in the Zhe School? Some Thoughts on the Huai’an Tomb Paintings
James Cahill, 7

Reading at a Window Beneath Pines

Artist unknown (late Yuan or early Ming dynasty, 14th c.?). Reading at a Window Beneath Pines. Section of a handscroll. From Huai’an, pl. 1.

One or Two, Repictured
Kristina Kleutghen, 25

Different Views of One or Two

Different views of One or Two. Upper portion: Anonymous. One or Two (Plum
Screen version). 1780. Palace Museum, Beijing.
Lower portion: (L) Anonymous. One or Two (Nārāyaṇa’s Cave version).
Qianlong reign-period (1736–1795). Palace Museum, Beijing.
(R) Anonymous. One or Two (Plum Screen version). 1780. Palace Museum, Beijing.

Kim Hongdo’s Sandalwood Garden: A Self-Image of a Late-Chosŏn Court Painter
Jiyeon Kim, 47

Chŏng Hwang. Gathering at the Gable of Ease and Peace

Chŏng Hwang. Gathering at the Gable of Ease and Peace. 1789. Chosŏn dynasty. Private collection, Korea.

Votive Paintings of the Kabuki Actors Ichikawa Danjūrō at Naritasan Shinshōji Temple
Hilary K. Snow, 69

Attrib. Honmakiya Mantarō. Shibaraku (Wait a Moment)

Attrib. Honmakiya Mantarō (early 19th c.). Shibaraku (Wait a Moment). 1823. Naritasan Reikō kan.

Pulitzer Foundation Workshop
Stanley K. Abe, 81

On November 10 and 11, 2011, the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts in St. Louis sponsored a workshop in which twelve graduate students and four professors of Asian art history commented on the context of objects in the Foundation’s exhibition “Reflections of the Buddha” (9 September 2011–10 March 2012). Many of the participants were not familiar with this exhibition of Buddhist art or the Foundation and its Tadao Andō–designed headquarters and exhibition space opened in 2001. However, the workshop raised many questions of context and meaning that should be of great interest to students, scholars, and curators of Asian art. Hence this publication of short reports from participants in the workshop: Phillip Bloom, Marsha Haufler, Katherine Brooks, Catherine Becker, and Stanley K. Abe.

Art of Asia Acquired by North American Museums, 2010–2011
105

A Monumental Portrait of a Monkey.

Attributed to the ‘‘Stipple Master’’ (active ca. 1692–ca. 1715). A Monumental Portrait of a Monkey. India, Rajasthan, Mewar, Udaipur. Ca. 1705–1710. The Art Institute of Chicago.

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