Pacific Science, vol. 70, no. 2 (2016)

A fourth generation Achatinella fuscobasis born into captivity at the University of Hawai'i’s tree-snail captive rearing facility. This population’s wild counterparts were long ago wiped out by invasive predators. Sischo et al. (this issue) examined genetic and demographic trends in the captive population over a period of more than 20 years (Photo by David R. Sischo).

Photo by David R. Sischo
A fourth generation Achatinella fuscobasis born into captivity at the University of Hawai’i’s tree-snail captive rearing facility. This population’s wild counterparts were long ago wiped out by invasive predators. In this issue David R. Sischo examines genetic and demographic trends in the captive population over a period of more than 20 years.

Pacific Science, Vol. 70#2, April 2016, is now out and contains the following works:

ARTICLES

Genetic and Demographic Insights into the Decline of a Captive Population of the Endangered Hawaiian Tree Snail Achatinella fuscobasis (Achatinellinae)”
David R. Sischo, Melissa R. Price, Mark- Anthony Pascua, and Michael G. Hadfi eld, 133

Population and Human Welfare Scenarios for the Island of Hawai‘i up to the Year 2100″
M. Kimura and P.- M. Binder, 143

“Ecology of a Vulnerable Shorebird across a Gradient of Habitat Alteration: Bristle- Thighed Curlews (Numenius tahitiensis) (Aves: Charadriiformes) on Palmyra Atoll
Ana Sofía Guerra, Fiorenza Micheli, and Chelsea L. Wood, 159


Find the full text of the issue at BioOne


Reef Community Changes Associated with the 2009–2010 El Niño
in the Southern Mexican Pacific
Andrés López- Pérez, Sergio Guendulain- García, Rebeca Granja- Fernández, Valeria Hernández- Urraca, Laura Galván- Rowland, Ronald Zepeta- Vilchis, and Daniel López- López, 175

The wall crab spider, Selenops mexicanus, on a moss covered tree outside of Cueva Actun Kan, Colonia del Bosque, Guatemala.

The wall crab spider, Selenops mexicanus, as examined in this issue in Spider Stowaways by Sarah C. Crews.

“Effect of Light Intensity and Wavelength on Diurnal Activity of the Banded Coral Shrimp Stenopus hispidus (Decapoda, Stenopodidae): A Possible Adaptation for a Cleaner Shrimp in Reef Environments
Yuriko Esaka, Eiji Yoshioka, Yuki Takeuchi, Sung- Pyo Hur, and Akihiro Takemura, 191

“Recent Dispersal Events among Solomon Islands Bird Species Reveal Differing Potential Routes of Island Colonization
Jason M. Sardell, 201

Leaf Litter Breakdown of Native and Exotic Tree Species in Two Hawaiian Streams that Differ in Flow
Megan Roberts, Ayron M. Strauch, Tracy Wiegner, and Richard A. Mackenzie, 209

Spider Stowaways: Molecular Data Support the Synonymization of Selenops galapagoensis with Selenops mexicanus (Araneae: Selenopidae) and Indicate Human- Mediated Introduction to the Galápagos Islands”
Sarah C. Crews, León Baert, and Anthea Carmichael, 223

Origin and Identity of Fejervarya (Anura: Dicroglossidae) on Guam”
Elijah Wostl, Eric N. Smith, and Robert N. Reed, 233

Anisakinae Nematodes in Two Commercial Marine Fish from the East Pacific of Baja California, Mexico”
M. A. Rodríguez- Santiago, J. A. Rosales- Casián, and M. I. Grano- Maldonado, 243


Find the full text of the issue at BioOne


About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

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Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

 

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