Journal of World History, vol. 26, no. 4 (2015)

Journal of World History volume 26 number 4 is a special issue edited by Gareth Curless, Stacey Hynd, Temilola Alanamu, and Katherine Roscoe. Titled “The British World as World History: Networks in Imperial and Global History,” this dedicated issue features imperial historians inspired by the “cultural turn” and the rise of global history. Instead of accounts that focus on a metropolitan center and a colonial periphery, scholars now advocate

a decentered approach to the study of empire, which emphasizes the importance of paying close attention to the multiple networks of capital, goods, information, and people that existed within and between empires. While these networked treatments of empire have added much to our understanding of imperialism, the articles in this special issue argue that historians must remain sensitive to the specifics of the imperial experience, the limits of imperialism’s global reach, and the way in which imperialism could lead to new forms of exclusion and inequality.

Articles in the special issue include:

  • The Establishment of the Tongwen Guan and the Fragile Sin-British Peace of the 1860s, by Melissa Mouat
  • “Home Allies”: Female Networks, Tensions, and Conflicted Loyalties in India and Van Diemen’s Land, 1826-1849, by Felicity Berry
  • Settler Historicism and Anticolonial Rebuttal in the British World, 1880-1920, by Andam Behm
  • The “Truth” about Kenya: Connection and Contestation in the 1956 Kamiti Controversy, by Katherine Bruce-Lockhart
  • “Tropical Allsorts”: The Transnational Flavor of British Development Policies in Africa, by Charlotte Lynia Riley
  • Functions and Failures of Transnational Activism: Discourses of Children’s Resistance and Repression in Global Anti-Apartheid Networks, by Emily Bridger
  • Book reviews


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


About the Journal

The Journal of World History publishes research into historical questions requiring the investigation of evidence on a global, comparative, cross-cultural, or transnational scale. It is devoted to the study of phenomena that transcend the boundaries of single states, regions, or cultures, such as large-scale population movements, long-distance trade, cross-cultural technology transfers, and the transnational spread of ideas.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the World History Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

The Journal of World History is proud to introduce a new article and peer review submission system, accessible now at at jwh.msubmit.net.

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