Cross-Currents, vol. 5, no. 2 (2016)

From “Guozhuang Trading Houses and Tibetan Middlemen in Dartsedo, the ‘Shanghai of Tibet'” in this issue. Photograph of Chu-nyi Barpa achak khapa (Ch. Qiujia guozhuang) taken by Sun Mingjing, 1944.

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review volume 5, number 2 is now available and features the following articles.

Frontier Tibet: Trade and Boundaries of Authority in Kham

  • Introduction to “Frontier Tibet: Trade and Boundaries of Authority in Kham” by Stephane Gros
  • “To Control Tibet, First Pacify Kham”: Trade Routes and “Official Routes” (Guandao) in Easternmost Kham by Partrick Booz
  • Construction Work and Wages at the Dergé Printing House in the Eighteenth Century by Remi Chaix
  • Guozhuang Trading Houses and Tibetan Middlemen in Dartsedo, the “Shanghai of Tibet” by Yudru Tsomu
  • Victorianizing Guangxu: Arresting Flows, Minting Coins, and
    Exerting Authority in Early Twentieth-Century Kham by Scott Relyea
  • Tricks of the Trade: Debt and Imposed Sovereignty in Southernmost Kham in the Nineteenth to Twentieth Centuries by Stephane Gros
  • Memory Politics at Work in a Gyalrong Revolt in the Early Twentieth Century by Jinba Tenzin
  • Afterword: Why Kham? Why Borderlands? Coordinating New
    Research Programs for Asia by C. Patterson Giersch

Mapping Vietnameseness

  • Introduction to “Mapping Vietnameseness” by Hue-Tam Ho Tai
  • From a Reliant Land to a Kingdom in Asia: Premodern Geographic Knowledge and the Emergence of the Geo-Body in Late Imperial Vietnam by Liam C. Kelley
  • Contested Sovereignty: Local Politics and State Power in Territorial Conflicts on the Vietnam-China Border 1650s–1880s by Vu Duong Luan
  • Vietnam at the Khmer Frontier: Boundary Politics, 1802–1847 by Vu Duc Liem

Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


About the Journal

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review offers its readers up-to-date research findings, emerging trends, and cutting-edge perspectives on material from the sixteenth century to the present day that have significant implications for current models of understanding East Asian history and culture. Its semiannual print issues feature peer-reviewed content from the online version of the journal.

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Individual and institutional subscriptions are available through UH Press.

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