U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal, no. 51 (2017)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

The U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal number 51 is a special issue commemorating the journal’s 50 previous issues.

We are honored to publish the fifty-first issue of the U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal (USJWJ)—complete with special features to commemorate the previous fifty issues—and to launch a new phase in our history. Founded in 1988, USJWJ is the world’s oldest scholarly journal devoted to the study of gender and Japan. We are a peer-reviewed, biannual publication, available in print and online, that promotes scholarly exchange on social, cultural, political, and economic issues. We encourage comparative study among Japan, the United States, and other countries, and feature articles about women’s lived experiences and media representations. Our mission is to foster the work of young researchers and to ensure that the achievements of established scholars are not forgotten.
— Alisa Freedman,
Editor’s Note [Free to Access on MUSE]

It features the following scholarly works including:

  • Building a Feminist Scholarly Community: Fifty-One Issues of U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal [Free to Access on MUSE]
    by Jan Bardsley
  • The Benefits and Lessons of Two Decades with U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal
    by Sally A. Hastings
  • Maiden Martyr for “New Japan”: The 1960 Ampo and the Rhetoric of the Other Michiko
    by Hiroko Hirakawa
  • Image-Makers and Victims: The Croissant Syndrome and Yellow Cabs
    by Aki Hirota
  • Nagai Michiko and Ariyoshi Sawako Rewrite the Taikō
    by Susan Westhafer Furukawa
  • Right Here, Right Here
    by Shibasaki Tomoka
  • Shibasaki Tomoka’s Literature of Location
    by Kendall Heitzman
  • Heisei Murasaki: What Women Poets Have Found during Japan’s Lost Decades
    by Jordan A. Y. Smith


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


About the Journal

The purpose of the U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal is to exchange scholarship on women and gender between the U.S., Japan and other countries, to enlarge the base of information available in Japan on the status of American women as well as women in other countries, to disseminate information on Japanese women to the U.S. and other countries, and to stimulate the comparative study of women’s issues.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

The editors of USJWJ welcome contributions consistent with its mission purpose. Submission guidelines can be found here.

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