Author Archives: alicia

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture, vol. 11 (2018)

Lim Ok-sang’s Landscape II, 1976, Ink and oil on rice paper, 64 × 128 cm, featured in this issue of Azalea.

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture volume 11 opens with the following note from editor Young-Jun Lee:

The Korean peninsula is now in the midst of a series of remarkable and dramatic changes. People the world over are surprised, curious, and relieved, especially those who feared imminent war on the peninsula. In addition, the first female president of Korea is now in prison, and her predecessor was also arrested and soon will be tried. The current president, who has a very high approval rating, used the Winter Olympics as a stage for international diplomacy and led North Korea to the bargaining table. We do not know if Kim Jong Un will give up nuclear weapons, or if Trump will sign a peace treaty or pledge economic cooperation, but it is no exaggeration to say that these changes are seismic.

With the news that North Korea was developing nuclear weapons and conducting missile tests, and that evacuation drills were taking place in Japan and Hawaii, people with relatives in Korea would call them, worried about their safety. There was also contrasting news. Some foreign media were surprised to hear that nothing appeared to be happening in Seoul, and its inhabitants were going about their daily lives despite the threat of imminent war. In turbulent times, art enables us to grasp these apparent contradictions and complexities. Art can give us insight into the minds of Koreans who are experiencing and responding to events as they happen. This volume of Azalea presents outstanding work that illuminates the Korean spirit under conditions both ordinary and extraordinary.

Writer in Focus: Cheon Myeong-Gwan

Excerpt from Whale
Cheon Myeong-gwan, Jae Won Chung

Twenty
Cheon Myeong-gwan, Jamie Chang

Excerpt from My Uncle Bruce Lee
Cheon Myeong-gwan, Susanna Lim

Pink
Cheon Myeong-gwan, Jamie Chang

A Conversation with Cheon Myeong-gwan
Jamie Chang

Fiction

A Journal from the Alpha-Omega Kosiwon
Park Min-gyu, Kyung Hyun Kim, Sue Heun Kim

Roadkill
Yun Ko Eun, Lizzie Buehler

Sister Thief
Bae Suah, Janet Hong

Forever a Narrator
Kim Ae-ran, Eungee Sung

Poetry

Poems by Kim Joong-Il, Lee Young-ju, Han Kang, Lee Jangwook, Ha Jaeyoun, and An Heeyeon.

Another Perspective

Raising the Profile of Korean Literature Overseas
Seong-Kon Kim

Special Feature: Yi T’aeujun

Introduction to Yi T’aejun’s Travels in China
Jun Youb Lee

Excerpt from Travels in China: A Great New China
Yi T’aejun, Jun Youb Lee

Images

Images and Image Index


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About the Journal

Azalea promotes Korean literature among English-language readers. Azalea introduces to the world new writers as well as promising translators, providing the academic community of Korean studies with well-translated texts for college courses. Writers from around the world also share their experience of Korean literature or culture with wider audiences.

Subscriptions

Subscriptions for both individuals and institutions are available here.

Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 57, no. 1 (2018)

Present-day Languages of Pentecost Island, from “A Follow-up Analysis of Listener (Mis)comprehension across Language Varieties in Pentecost, Vanuatu” by Cindy Schneider and Charlotte Gooskens in this issue of Oceanic Linguistics. Image Source: Andrew Gray, 2016.

The summer issue of Oceanic Linguistics includes the following works:

ARTICLES

  • The Genetic Status of Lamalamic: Phonological and Morphological Evidence by Jean-Christophe Verstraete
  • Plural-Marking Strategies in Äiwoo by Åshild Næss
  • Directional Systems in Philippine Languages by Maria Kristina S. Gallego
  • Sex Differentiable Terms in Languages of Flores Island: A Comparative Review by Gregory Forth
  • Counting by Tens: Specific Counting in Southeast Solomonic Languages by Deborah Hill and Paul Unger
  • A Follow-up Analysis of Listener (Mis)comprehension across Language Varieties in Pentecost, Vanuatu by Cindy Schneider and Charlotte Gooskens
  • The Plural Word hire in Alorese: Contact-Induced Change from Neighboring Alor-Pantar Languages by Francesca R. Moro
  • Lexical Tone in Metnyo Ambel by Laura Arnold
  • The “Mystery Aspirates” in Philippine Languages by Robert Blust

In Memoriam

  • In Memoriam: Jean-Claude Rivierre, 1938–2018 by Claire Moyse-Faurie

Plus book reviews.


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About the Journal

Oceanic Linguistics is the only journal devoted exclusively to the study of the indigenous languages of the Oceanic area and parts of Southeast Asia.

Subscriptions

Annual subscription rates are US$120 for institutions and US $40 for individuals. Click here to subscribe.

Submissions

All submissions and editorial inquiries should be addressed to John Lynch, Editor, at oceanic@hawaii.edu.

Asian Perspectives, vol. 57, no. 1 (2018)

This issue of Asian Perspectives also features the following scholarly works: Continue reading

Philosophy East and West, vol. 68, no. 2 (April 2018)

Philosophy East and West vol. 68, no. 2 includes the following scholarly works:

Articles

Life without Belief: A Madhyamaka Defense of the Livability of Pyrrhonism
by Robin Brons

Creatio ex nihilo and Ancient Chinese Philosophy: A Revisiting of Robert Neville’s Thesis
by Yonghua Ge

Giovanni Pico della Mirandola, Johanan Alemanno, al-Ghazālī’s The Niche
of Lights
by Scott Michael Girdner

Promising Across Lives to Save Non-Existent Beings: Identity, Rebirth, and the Bodhisattva’s Vow
by Stephen E. Harris

Kumārila and Knows-Knows
by Daniel Immerman

Nishida Kitarō’s Philosophy of Absolute Nothingness (Zettaimu no tetsugaku) and Modern Theoretical Physics
by Agnieszka Kozyra

Sounding out Différance: Derrida, Saussure, and Bhartr. hari
by Charles Li

Tradition and Modernity in Liang Shuming’s Eastern and Western Cultures and Their Philosophies
by Philippe Major

Artistic Production and the Making of the Artist: Applying Nishida Kitarō to Discussions of Authorship
by Kyle Peters

An Approach to Comparative Phenomenology: Nishida’s Place of Nothingness and Merleau-Ponty’s Negativity
by Maria Carmen López Sáenz

Transmitting the Sage’s “Heart” (II): Instructing Absolute Practice—The Perfection of the Perfect Teaching in Mou Zongsan’s Reconstruction of the Confucian Daotong
by Rafael Suter

The Commentary Tradition on Suhrawardī
by L. W. Cornelis van Lit

Incommensurability and Comparative Philosophy
by Xinli Wang

Plus commentary and discussion, a featured review, print book reviews, books received, and online book reviews.


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new issues from Project MUSE


About the Journal

Promoting academic literacy on non-Western traditions of philosophy, Philosophy East and West has for over half a century published the highest-quality scholarship that locates these cultures in their relationship to Anglo-American philosophy.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

The journal welcomes specialized articles in Asian philosophy and articles that seek to illuminate, in a comparative manner, the distinctive characteristics of the various philosophical traditions in the East and West. See the submission guidelines here.

Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 56, no. 2 (2017)

Earlier this year, we unveiled a new cover for Oceanic Linguistics in the first issue of volume 56. The second issue of each year has the same design with an alternate color scheme.

The new covers of Oceanic Linguistics.

In addition to the new look, the December issue includes the following works:

ARTICLES

  • Definiteness and Referentiality in Rapa Nui: The Interplay of Determiners and Demonstratives by Paulus Kieviet
  • Dynamism and Change in the Possessive Classifier System of Iaai by Anne-Laure Dotte
  • Toward Paradigm Uniformity: A Longitudinal Study in Alamblak by Les Bruce
  • Evidence of Contact between Binanderean and Oceanic Languages by Joel Bradshaw
  • Epenthetic and Contrastive Glottal Stops in Amarasi by Owen Edwards
  • The Western Malayo-Polynesian Problem by Alexander D. Smith

Squib

  • Regular Metathesis in Batanic (Northern Philippines)? by Robert Blust

Plus book reviews.

Continue reading

Journal of World History, vol. 28, no. 2 (2017)

The March issue of  Journal of World History volume 28 number 2 features the following articles and a special forum by world history scholars:

Articles

  • Why Do Only Some Places Have History? Japan, the West, and the Geography of the Past
    By Julia Adeney Thomas
  • Cross-Cultural Friendship and Legal Pluralities in the Early Pacific Salt-Pork Trade
    By Alecia Pru Simmonds
  • We are Not Pirates: Portugal, China, and the Pirates of Coloane (Macao), 1910
    By Robert J. Antony

Continue reading

Hawaiian Journal of History, Vol. 51 (2017)


This year marks the 125th anniversary of the Hawaiian Historical Society, and in recognition of this anniversary, the society has printed its logo on the cover of its annual volume of The Hawaiian Journal of History. The logo was redesigned in 1977 and, according to an introduction by Shari Y. Tamashiro:

The two islands represent the Hawaiian Islands, the double-hulled sailing canoe represents the culture of the Native Hawaiians who found and settled the islands, and the three-masted sailing ship represents the cultures of the non-Hawaiians who followed.

The society publishes books in both English and Hawaiian, and HJH is a leading peer-reviewed journal that focuses on the history of Native Hawaiians and all other cultures in Hawai‘i during both pre- and post-contact times.

Continue reading

The Female Spirit: Red Peonies in American Book Review (MĀNOA Vol. 28, Issue 2)

“The Female Spirit,” Diane Goodman’s review of MĀNOA special issue Red Peonies: Two Novellas of China (Vol. 28, Issue 2) appears in the May/June 2017 issue of the American Book Review.

American Book Review

Red Peonies reviewed in the May/June 2017 issue of American Book Review. Find issue on Project MUSE.

Red Peonies features two novellas, “The Woman Liu” and “The Woman Yang” by Chinese writer Zhang Yihe. The novellas were translated by Karen Gernant and Chen Zeping. Goodman writes:

The Woman Liu and The Woman Yang are compelling examinations of love, fear, sacrifice and survival, betrayal, compassion, manipulation, friendship, and trust and sometimes even a kind of redemption. But maybe most of all, Red Peonies: Two Novellas of China are a powerful testimony to the fortitude of the female spirit.

Goodman is the author of three short story collections and associate professor at Grand Canyon University. Learn about the American Book Review on their website, and find the review on Project MUSE.


Red Peonies: Two Novellas of ChinaMĀNOA is edited by Frank Stewart and Pat Matsueda.

Purchase Red Peonies as a book from UH Press or subscribe to MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing.

Browse full-text of Red Peonies online at Project MUSE.

Manoa: A Conversation with Playwright Catherine Filloux

Watercolor drawings in this volume are by Camille Assaf, costume designer for the U.S. premiere of Lemkin’s House in 2006.

The following is excerpted from the new MĀNOA edition, Eyes of the Heart: The Selected Plays of Catherine Filloux (Vol. 29, No. 1).

For twenty-five years, Catherine Filloux has been writing plays about human rights and social justice. She has also been a spokesperson for the value of theater as a force for social change. She has given readings and workshops and overseen productions in Cambodia, Sudan, South Sudan, Iraq, Morocco, Northern Ireland, Italy, Belgium, and Bosnia. Her more than twenty plays and librettos have been produced in New York, across the U.S., and in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East, and her essays have appeared in such leading theater magazines as American Theatre and Drama Review.

Most recently, she was honored in New York City with the 2017 Otto René Castillo Award for Political Theatre. Her new play Kidnap Road was presented by Anna Deavere Smith as part of NYU’s Institute on the Arts and Civic Dialogue in 2016. For her long career of activism in the theater community, Filloux received the 2015 Planet Activist Award. Her play whatdoesfreemean?—about women and mass incarceration in the U.S.—will premiere in 2018, produced by Nora’s Playhouse. She is also the librettist for three produced operas—including Where Elephants Weep, which premiered in Cambodia—and has been commissioned by the Vienna State Opera to write the libretto for composer Olga Neuwirth’s new opera, Orlando, to premiere in 2019.

A former Fulbright senior specialist in Cambodia and Morocco, Filloux is an artist-in-residence at La MaMa Theatre, a member of the Vassar College faculty, and a cofounder of Theatre Without Borders.

The following conversation took place in July 2017.

MĀNOA: You’ve been writing plays for a long time. What in your background led you to concentrate on issues of human rights, social justice, and equality?

CATHERINE FILLOUX: French was my first language, and when I learned English I consumed it with joy. I grew up on the border between San Diego and Tijuana, and was very familiar with that border and with Mexico. My father grew up in France during the Nazi occupation when the country was split into zones. My mother’s French-Belgian-Corsican family lived in Algeria, North Africa, for three generations before her. I inherited the privilege of being a citizen of the world. And we were strangers in a strange land.

When I first went to Cambodia in 2001, it was almost a decade after I had begun writing about the genocide. What Cambodian women refugees had told me for years made it seem as if Pol Pot—his real name Saloth Sar—was in the room with us, though we were in Bronx, New York. Why did he do it? I wondered. Why were they now here, these women whom I grew to love, in this strange land, where they told me Spanish would be a better language to learn than English, since the Bronx was a Dominican neighborhood. And also Dominican were the Sisters who ran St. Rita’s Refugee Center in the Bronx, where we all met.

When I landed for the first time at the airport in Phnom Penh, I could feel the wandering ghosts, kmauit, as I got on the back of a moto and entered the sea of motos that formed the most extraordinary Zen flow of traffic I’d ever seen.

MĀNOA: You have had plays produced, held workshops, and spoken about theater and human rights all over the world. And Theatre Without Borders, which you cofounded, is devoted to supporting theater worldwide. How would you compare the ways that socially aware theater such as yours—dealing with very difficult social and legal issues—is received in some of the countries you’ve been to? What has been the reaction to these kinds of plays?

CF: I’ve experienced productions of my plays translated into languages including Arabic, Bosnian, French, Guatemalan Spanish, Khmer (Cambodian), and Kurdish, in a variety of international venues. I’m always struck by the flexibility that is required when a playwright crosses borders. In the U.S., a playwright’s words are not to be altered; however, I’ve found that compromise and having an open mind are key attributes. One lives in between languages, always hoping to find better connections and associations for translation and not always succeeding. However, this itself is part of that artistic process.

MĀNOA: Most of the plays in Eyes of the Heart deal with the unequal status of women, who are the main characters in all the works except Lemkin’s House—and there, women also figure prominently. Do you feel a responsibility to portray the global condition of women in your work, and do you think that too little attention has been given to women in theater, especially with regard to human rights?

CF: I wrote the play Mary and Myra in the year 2000, and in 2016 I saw a production in Salt Lake City, right before the presidential election. The timeliness of this story was apparent. History repeats itself. Plays may influence and offer the tools to help people make distinctions between truth and lies, and to nurture intellectual and emotional freedom. Myra Bradwell was written out of history by her adversary, Susan B. Anthony, and needed to be resurrected. And Mary’s reputation was maligned by biographers. Theater places stories in front of hearts and minds, as a sentient being, as an experience that is living and transforming. In my play, Mary Todd Lincoln says to Myra Bradwell, “I believe you mean well with your causes. But you fight so often with the opposite sex you’ve become it.” And Myra responds, “I have fought endlessly for justice, placing the law ahead of myself on every occasion, and they have ignored me, trampled on me, placed obstacle after obstacle in my path. I am furious! Give me the secret about your son.” When I saw Mary and Myra recently, I remembered how its first director commented that Myra’s lines sounded perhaps a bit too much like the playwright. I smiled to myself when I heard the play so many years later.

I read that Raphael Lemkin was home-schooled by his mother. This inspired me in writing the end of my play Lemkin’s House. Plays and theater can raise awareness regarding challenging subjects—creating a space for dialogue—and a commitment to the power of language and the power of healing. Theater can have a responsibility to foster civic discourse and to spark people to think critically. It can offer ethical queries and put marginalized communities onto center stage.

MĀNOA: War and violence are important issues in your plays. How are you able to put such large, difficult subjects on the stage, especially using so few actors? How does your passion for these subjects affect your daily life?

CF:  I see myself as a witness in my theater work. In terms of theatrical language, I like to design a kind of poetry, which lives and breathes through action and characters onstage. The poet Wallace Stevens says, “The poem must resist the intelligence / Almost successfully.” The language of theater onstage and the audience are involved in a collaboration—a co-creation. I believe theater as an art form exists every time differently—it lives and breathes in a community. When Albert Camus, the French and Algerian author, says theater is, “The night when the game is played,” he means each time with a different outcome, like a sports match. And for me, theater pieces are prisms, which cast different lights for each audience member: everyone imagines and interprets the plays differently, which allows a shared personal experience.

MĀNOA: Thank you for your work.


Eyes of the Heart is a collection of six plays by award-winning playwright Catherine Filloux: Eyes of the Heart; Kidnap Road; Lemkin’s House; Mary and Myra; Selma ’65; and Silence of God. The plays have both national and international settings. Subjects include key figures in the history of human and civil rights; genocide; crimes against women; international human rights law; U.S. Civil Rights Movement; and Women’s Suffrage.

Browse this issue on Project MUSE. Order a single issue or receive this special issue as part of a subscription to Mānoa here.

Interview: Language Documentation & Conservation editor Nick Thieberger

In the fall of 2005, linguistics professor Kenneth L. Rehg and UHM Foreign Language Resource Center director Richard Schmidt planned a meeting with the goal of advancing language documentation and associated activities as a legitimate subfield of linguistics. In the spring, 28 linguists gathered at the East-West Center from as far east as Japan and as far west as New England, and as far south as Australia. As a result of this meeting, the journal Language Documentation & Conservation launched in June 2007.

From the outset, LD&C has been an open access journal because, as founding editor Rehg writes, “In many communities where vulnerable and endangered languages are spoken, any amount charged for a subscription is too much.” In the past decade, the journal has provided 340 articles comprising 10 volumes, totaling more than 661,000 downloads. Below, current editor Nick Thieberger discusses the benefits of being an online-only journal and what’s in store for LD&C as it enters its second decade.

You’ve been with Language Documentation & Conservation since the beginning, starting as the Technology Review Editor and then taking over from founding editor Kenneth L. Rehg in 2011. Can you share with us how LD&C got started and your current work leading the journal?

For background on how LD&C began, please see the recent article by our founding editor. The role of editor involves coordinating production, doing initial assessments of contributions (sometimes with the help of the Editorial Board), finding reviewers, maintaining the website, and updating the Facebook page.

Dr. Nick Thieberger (R) plays audio of the Koita language near Port Moresby to Koitabuan E’ava Geita (L). Picture: Rachel Nordlinger. This image was first published in the Pursuit article, “Islands of language enter virtual reality.”

In Prof. Rehg’s “The Founding of Language Documentation & Conservation” (Vol. 11), he notes that one of the goals of the journal was to “focus … on topics that do not readily find a home in other journals.” How is LD&C unique from other journals in your field?

Issues around language documentation and revitalization have become increasingly relevant in the past decade or two. With the increased focus on language endangerment, more attention is being paid to creating good records of as many different performances and speakers as possible. Performance includes narratives, dialogues, songs, multi-participant events as well as good old-fashioned elicitation.

The journal Language Documentation & Conservation provides a venue for exploring new methods in creating language records and in using records for language revitalization. It is unique in its scope and in the quality of its contributions (peer-reviewed since the first issue in 2007). A topic of particular current interest is the ‘collection overview’ which presents a guide to a set of primary language records, allowing readers to identify its extent and the context in which it was created. We hope that such overviews will become more common in our discipline.

LD&C was designed to be an electronic-only, open access journal, which was uncommon when you launched the journal in 2006. Why was this important then, and why does it remain relevant now?

LD&C has been committed to providing open access from its inception. As so many of the languages that are the focus of language documentation efforts are spoken in small communities, we want to ensure that the research we publish is fully accessible to anyone with Internet access. We ensure longevity of access by lodging all LD&C content in the University of Hawai‘i’s digital repository, linked from our website.

Online publication allows us to produce articles quickly and to embed media to illustrate examples in the papers. It also allows authors to add material incrementally over time.

We encourage subscription, which is free, so that readers can be informed twice a year about new content, which we upload four times a year.

LD&C Editor Nick Thieberger took this photo at the University of Hawai‘i and posted it on the journal’s Facebook page.

Where is LD&C going next?

We have published a couple of volumes that allow incremental addition of new material over time, taking advantage of the non-book format of online publication. SCOPIC is a volume that will provide a series of papers in the next few years. In the pipeline now is a grammar that will be published incrementally in what would have been called fascicles in the past.

With 11 volumes and 13 special publications now available, is there an issue that you’re particularly proud of?

With 340 articles produced it is hard to choose among them. However, the most popular article has been download over 60,000 times (see the statistics here).

Do you have any advice for academics interested in submitting to LD&C?

Take advantage of the possibilities offered by online publishing. Include media as examples of phenomena discussed in the article, include corpus materials that allow readers to check your analysis and to potentially carry out their own reanalysis of the data.



About the Journal

Language Documentation & Conservation is a free open-access journal on issues related to language documentation and revitalization. The journal is sponsored by the National Foreign Language Resource Center.

Submissions

Instructions for submission can be found on the Language Documentation & Conservation‘s website.