Author Archives: alicia

Oceanic Linguistics on set of sci-fi film, Arrival

The 2016 science-fiction film Arrival features Dr. Louise Banks, who is called upon to communicate with aliens after they arrive on Earth. The linguistics professor, played by Amy Adams, is shown in this publicity still in her office full of linguistics books and journals, including Oceanic Linguistics!

Publicity still from Arrival via Language Log.

According to “The making of a cinematic linguist’s office” on Language Log, the books in Dr. Banks’ office were borrowed from the film’s linguist consultants at McGill University, including Jessica Coon, Morgan Sonderegger, and Lisa deMena Travis (who published in Oceanic Linguistics Vol. 39 Issue 1).

Though set designers were less interested in titles than blue and beige colored covers, it’s great to see Oceanic Linguistics on the big screen. The current cover design (left) was launched in the journal’s fifth volume in the Summer of 1966, with a cover stock update (right) in 2009.

This year, Oceanic Linguistics will unveil a new cover for this longstanding linguistics journal that continues to grow with its field. Stay tuned for the new cover and an interview with editor John Lynch.

Learn more about Oceanic Linguistics here.

HJH author expands on Kalaupapa history at 4/13 event

Lawrence Judd and his wife Eva at Kalaupapa, circa 1949. Courtesy of the National Park Service, Kalaupapa National Historic Park, Kalaupapa Historical Society Collection, published in Hawaiian Journal of History Vol. 50.

The Hawaiian Historical Society invites members and friends to a presentation that features Fred E. Woods, Ph.D., author of “A Vow Remembered: Lawrence M. Judd and His Pledge to Kalaupapa,” published in The Hawaiian Journal of History, volume 50.  The lecture is free and open to the public.

The presentation is titled, “Reflections of Kalaupapa” and will expand upon Dr. Wood’s Journal article to include insights and information from his two most recently published books: Kalaupapa: The Mormon Experience in an Exiled Community (2017) and Reflections of Kalaupapa (2017).  Both books will be available for puchase at the meeting.

Dr. Woods will provide reflections of Kalaupapa by patients, employees, volunteers, visitors, and his own observations based on scores of oral history interviews, primary sources, and personal experience.

The annual membership meeting and program takes place on April 13, 2017, at the Kapiʻolani Community College, Hale ʻŌhiʻa. Doors open at 5:45 p.m. and the evening begins with a screening of the 2011 documentary film, “Soul of Kalaupapa” at 6:00 p.m. Learn more here.

Most Downloaded Journal Articles 2016

In 2016, our online journals content hosted by Project MUSE attracted visitors from nearly 2,300 institutions in 77 countries. The full-text of 500+ articles were downloaded nearly 100,000 times, with full issues downloaded 300,000 times. Here we share with you the top downloaded article for each of our titles in 2016.

Many of our journals have decades of history and it’s great to see archival content still relevant to readers today. China Review International’s most downloaded article is 20 years old, whereas The Contemporary Pacific and Philosophy East & West attracted the most downloads with 2016 content.

Enjoy these articles on MUSE and stay tuned for highlights from individual journals. You may sign up for TOC alerts for any of our journals here.

Asian Perspectives
The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific
Vol. 51, No. 2 (2002)
Material Practice and the Metamorphosis of a Sign: Early Buddhist Stupas and the Origin of Mahayana Buddhism” by Lars Fogelin

Asian Theatre Journal
Official Journal of the Association for Asian Performance

Vol. 22, No. 1 (Spring 2005)
NEE ENGEY: WHERE ARE YOU?” Media Review by Kathy Foley

Azalea
Journal of Korean Literature and Culture

Vol. 2 (2008)
Lingering Impressions of a Mountain Village—A Few Paragraphs from a Journal of Travels to Sŏngch’ŏn” by Yi Sang, translated by John Frankl

Biography
An Interdisciplinary Quarterly
Vol. 25, No. 2 (2002)
Biography Theory and Method:
 The Case of Samuel Johnson” by Carl Rollyson

Buddhist-Christian Studies
Official Journal of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies

Vol.  32 (2012)
Womanist” by Alice Walker Continue reading

International Women’s Day

March 8 is International Women’s Day, celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. Today we share with you four articles from our archives featuring the lives of women from the U.S., Asia and the Pacific.

Issei Women and Work: Washerwoman, Prostitutes, Midwives and Barbers” by Kelli Y. Nakamura, Hawaiian Journal of History, Vol. 49, 2015.

Hawaiian Journal of History 49“[A]s women were paid less than men, many had to take on additional ‘women’s jobs’ like laundering, cooking, and sewing to ensure their families’ economic survival. . . . For Issei women, Hawai‘i offered unprecedented personal and economic opportunities, transforming traditional ideas of ‘proper’ gender roles in both America and Japan. By the necessity of engaging in different types of work, Issei women broke down the traditional divide that separated the domestic and public spheres.”

 


It’s Women’s Work” by Jenny Zorn, Yearbook of the Association for Pacific Coast Geographers, Vol. 69, 2007.

“Many of the women sitting out here today are the only woman in their department. That’s not easy. I was the first and only woman hired in my department in its 40-year history. Only last year was the second woman hired in that department.

“I found mentors in a variety of places: geographers at other campuses, people in other disciplines, and the principal at my kids’ elementary school. Wherever I saw a leader I could learn from, I watched, I read their biographies; I sought mentoring wherever I could find it.

“So I appreciate the differences I see. I appreciate the opportunities I’ve had that many before me did not.”


Traveling Stories, Colonial Intimacies, and Women’s Histories in Vanautu,” by Margaret Rodman, The Contemporary Pacific, Vol. 16, No. 2, Fall 2004.

“The story of the 1937 death of an eighteen-month-old girl named Wilhemina (Mina) Whitford in the care of her ni-Vanuatu nursemaid, Evelyn, frames this article. The Whitford’s version of this story was heard in the course of fieldwork with descendants of settler families. They tie Mina’s accidental death to an affair Evelyn was having with a male settler. What about Evelyn? How could she be located and her version of events recorded? More generally, how can the unwritten histories of women’s experiences be recovered in a Pacific island context? How can indigenous women write their own histories of gender in the contexts of colonial experience?”


Gender Politics in the Korean Transition to Democracy” by Jeong-Lim Nam in Korean Studies, Vol. 24, 2000.

untitled“Women’s activism in South Korea was shaped by their role in the opposition to military dictatorship. For example, their struggles against sexual torture and state violence mobilized opposition groups around the issues of human rights, social justice, and democratic politics. . . . Their contributions to the grassroots struggles were crucial in determining the outcome of their activism, illustrating the importance of women’s roles in the Korean transition to democracy. Although these groups had different interests and goals, their mobilization and protests converged on the strategy of the opposition to the inhumane ruling of the military government.”

Learn more about UHP journals here.

Reception with Dr. Yosihiko Sinoto on publication of Curve of the Hook (Manoa)

Oli by Auli‘i Mitchell at Native Books on Dec. 16. Image courtesy of Mānoa.

Years in the making, the new issue of Mānoa features the work of archaeologist Yosihiko Sinoto, now 92. Upon publication of this special issue, titled Curve of the Hook, Native Books in Honolulu hosted a reception with Dr. Sinoto on Dec. 16.

The reception began with an oli, a chant, by Auli‘i Mitchell, pictured above. Mitchell, a cultural anthropologist, spoke of how he witnessed Dr. Sinoto’s archaeological work in the Pacific years ago. “For me, personally, seeing your work changed my life,” he said.

Dr. Sinoto’s research fundamentally changed the way the world views the accomplishments of ancient Polynesians, whose early voyages are considered to be among the great achievements in human history.

Colleagues, friends and family spoke of Dr. Sinoto’s work and legacy, presenting him with leis, photographs and thanks. Their recollections lent a personal touch to an already impressive and inspiring life in archaeology. Colleagues spoke of Dr. Sinoto’s first student quarters at the University of Hawaii (there were a lot of cats) and field seasons in Tahiti (he was a great dancer).

curve-manoa28-1-precvr-to-uhpCurve of the Hook is the first book-length work in English about Dr. Sinoto’s life and work. The full-color book has more than 100 illustrations, including rare photos from Dr. Sinoto’s private collection, plus notes and a list of references.

Order a single issue or receive this special issue as part of a subscription to Mānoa here.

Philosophy East and West, vol. 66, no. 1 (2016)

In the introduction to this issue, Arindam Chakrabarti writes:

It is not a semantic accident that four key notions of social ethics are also key concepts of theater. These are the concepts of character, playing a part/role, performance, and acting. Of course, one could object that there is a touch of pun in this claim: A character in a drama is not quite the same as good or bad character in a virtue ethics; acting in theater is mere play-acting, whereas acting in social and personal life is serious business. But the distinction between play and serious business does not mean that the former is any less important than the latter.

Continue reading

The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 28 no. 1 (2016)

Birds With Skymirrors (2010). Photo by Sebastian Bolesch, featured in The Contemporary Pacific Vol. 28 No. 1. Concept, design, choreography, and direction by Lemi Ponifasio.

This issue of The Contemporary Pacific features a dialogue on Pacific Studies from both Lea Lani Kinikini Kauvaka and Terence Wesley-Smith, political reviews on Micronesia and Polynesia, the work of artist Lemi Ponifasio, and the following articles:

  • Local Norms and Truth Telling: Examining Experienced Incompatibilities within Truth Commissions of Solomon Islands and Timor-Leste by Holly L. Guthrey
  • Multidimensional, Gender-Sensitive Poverty Measurement: Perspectives from Fiji by Priya Chattier
  • Musical Melanesianism: Imagining and Expressing Regional Identity and Solidarity in Popular Song and Video by Michael Webb
  • Cartooning History: Lai’s Fiji and the Misadventures of a Scrawny Black Cat by Sudesh Mishra

Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


The Contemporary PacificAbout the Journal

The Contemporary Pacific provides a publication venue for interdisciplinary work in Pacific studies with the aim of providing informed discussion of contemporary issues in the Pacific Islands region.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Submissions must be original works not previously published and not under consideration or scheduled for publication by another publisher. Manuscripts should be 8,000 to 10,000 words, or no more than 40 double-spaced pages, including references. Find submission guidelines here.