Author Archives: pwilson6

Journal of Daoist Studies, Volume 10 (2017)

The University of Hawai’i Press is pleased to announce the availability of Volume 10, 2017 of the Journal of Daoist Studies.

The Journal of Daoist Studies (JDS) is an annual publication dedicated to the scholarly exploration of Daoism in all its different dimensions. Each issue has three main parts: Academic Articles on history, philosophy, art, society, and more (limit 8,500 words); Forum on Contemporary Practice on issues of current activities both in China and other parts of the world (limit 5,000 words); and News of the Field, presenting publications, dissertations, conferences and websites.

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Table-of-Contents Volume 10, 2017

Articles
Zhuangzi and Wittgenstein on the Self by Yumin Ao and Ulrich Steinvorth

Xu Mi’s Network: A Different Perspective on Early Higher Clarity Daoism by Thomas E. Smith

The Formation of a Daoist Pictorial Iconography in the Tang by Patricia Eichenbaum Karetzky

Daoist Seals, Part One: Activation and Fashioning by Shih-Shan Susan Huang

Daoist Ritual Manuals in Vietnam: Activating Stars and Trigrams by Ekaterina Zavidovskaia

Forum on Contemporary Practice
Daoist Literary Criticism by John Leonard

Daoist Visions of the Dream State by Esmaeil Radpour 

Ways to Immortality: In Popular and Daoist Tales by Wang Xiaoyang and Bao Yan

Physics, Physicality, and Physiology: The Foundation of Daoist Self-Cultivation by Steve Jackowicz

Daoism and Peace Psychology by Ron Catabia

The American Transformation of Daoist Cultivation by Livia Kohn

The Caishan Goddess Temple: Then and Now by Wei Yanli

News of the Field
Obituaries: Tan Dajiang 谭大江

Publications 

Conferences

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Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society -Volume 10: 1 (2017)

The UJSEALSniversity of Hawai’i Press is pleased to work with the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society to publish the Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society.

For additional information about the journal please visit the journal home page.

The first five articles are now available online for volume 10, number 1 (2017). Additional content will be posted online at:  https://evols.library.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10524/52368

Phonological Sketch of the Sida Language of Luang Namtha, Laos by Nathan Badenoch and Hayashi Norihiko

On the Number of Voices in Madurese by Helen Jeoung

Biliteracy across Scripts: Implications for Language Development in Southeast Asia by Christina Page

An evaluation of So language vitality in Thailand by Thomas M. Tehan and Linda Markowski

A Phonological Comparison of Gamale, Sheram and Ghusbang – Three Kham Varieties by  Christopher P. Wilde

JSEALS is an open access publication. All journal content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license.

Sponsor: Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Call for Papers to be published in Korean Studies


KS Cover.jpg

Korean Studies seeks to further scholarship on Korea by providing a forum for discourse on timely subjects, and addresses a variety of scholarly topics through interdisciplinary and multicultural articles, book reviews, and essays in the humanities and social sciences. All scholarly articles on Korea and the Korean community abroad are welcomed, including topics of interest to the specialist and non-specialist alike. The journal is invaluable for Korea specialists as well as those whose interests touch on Korea, the Korean community abroad, or Asian, ethnic, and comparative studies.

The journal publishes new research, review articles, and book reviews about various topics within the field of Korean Studies. All articles are printed in English, and all submissions must be in English following the submission guidelines available from the journal home page.  All manuscripts should be submitted with text formatted in Times New Roman, 12-point font, single-spaced, with 1” margins, and pages numbered. Korean transliteration should conform to the McCune-Reischauer system, with the exception that the Yale romanization system may be used in linguistics articles. Original Asian characters may be included in parentheses (e.g., Korean, Chinese, Japanese) for words whose meanings may not be clear when translated into English. See previous issues for reference.

Submission Types:  Korean Studies publishes regular research articles (10,000-word limit), news and viewpoint pieces (2,000-word limit), and book reviews (1,000-word limit). Research articles may present new research findings or review current debates in a specific field. News and viewpoint pieces may take the form of responses to previously published works, either in Korean Studies or another venue. However, note that original authors will have the opportunity to review response pieces and respond with formal replies. Once a manuscript is formally accepted each manuscript will proceed through copy-editing. Once copy-editing is completed every manuscript will be uploaded to the Advance Publication site as a paper formally “In Press” [with associated DOI (Digital Object Identifier)]. It is then downloadable and citable. Formal publication in an issue of the journal, including publication year, volume and page numbers, will occur when the editor has a sufficient number of papers to complete an issue. Once all papers are accepted for an issue the manuscripts are compiled and the production process is completed, at which time the issue will be published online and in print.

Please review the complete Submission Guidelines, available online. Article submissions should be sent to the Editor: Christopher Bae, Center for Korean Studies, University of Hawai‘i.  email: cjbae@hawaii.edu Please send book review inquiries to the Book Review Editor: Ji Young Kim.  email: jkim22@hawaii.edu

Archives of Asian Art – Sale on issues.

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Special Offer on issues of Archives of Asian Art

Single back issues are regularly $35 each but you may order now at the special rate of $25 each. The special double issue (vol. 65) is priced at only $40.

Postage is included for mailing addresses within the USA. For shipping outside the USA, please add $5.00 per issue ordered.

We are also offering a special discounted individual subscription rate if you renew now for Volume 66, 2016 (in production).  Regularly $60, now only $50 and includes shipping within the USA.

This special offer expires August 1, 2016. Please order soon for best selection! Continue reading

China Review International, vol. 20, no. 1-2 (2013)

FEATURES
Early Chinese Political Thought as Conversation
Eirik Lang Harris, 1

From None but Self Expect Applause
Shiamin Kwa, 7

Viable Social Identities in a Shifting Cultural Landscape
William Jankowiak, 16

Identity Research, Conjectured Study
Grant Shen, 18

Playing the Language Game in China: On Perry Link’s: An Anatomy of Chinese: Rhythm, Metaphor, Politics
Paul G. Pickowicz, 31

To Thrive, Survive, and Prosper as an Ordinary Urbanite
William Jankowiak, 38 Continue reading

Cross-Currents, vol. 4, no. 2 (2015)

Cross-Currents (4#2) is now available on Project Muse.

Governing Marriage Migrations: Perspectives from Mainland China and Taiwan

Introduction
Elena Barabantseva, Antonia Chao, and Biao Xiang, 405

Cross-border migration for the purpose of marriage is on the rise, and at present it constitutes one of the most common forms of long-term international mobility in East Asia. This special issue of Cross-Currents analyzes marriage migration in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and Taiwan as a subject of governance. The articles included here demonstrate that marriage migration has attracted considerable policy attention and public anxiety not because it is about “marriage” or “migration” per se, but because it is perceived to be inseparable from a wide range of other issues, such as sexual morality, family norms, national identity, and border security. In particular, the long-lasting social relationships marriage migration creates and the role of marriage migrants (the vast majority of whom are women) in rearing the next generation of the state’s sovereign subjects tie marriage migration to state security concerns. Popular anxieties about marriage migration are often based on projections into the future rather than observations about the present reality. On one hand, the fact that marriage migration is deeply embedded in myriad social institutions and relations that cannot be dealt with in isolation causes a projection-based mode of governance; on the other hand, it renders transnational marriage particularly hard to govern, which further exacerbates anxiety. But this should not be seen as a failure in public policy. The articles in this special issue argue that such projections, imaginations, and self-perpetuating anxieties are important parts of how nationhood is constructed in the current era. As such, marriage migration as a subject of governance provides us with a special angle to examine how politics works in subtle and sometimes invisible ways on local, national, and transnational levels.

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Buddhist-Christian Studies, 35 (2015)

Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE

Editorial
Buddhist-Christian Dialogue: Moving Forward
Thomas Cattoi and Carol S. Anderson, vii
“Fifteen years into the twenty-first century and thirty-four years after the publication of its first issue, where does this transformed academic and cultural landscape leave a journal like Buddhist-Christian Studies? The dialogue between Buddhism and Christianity is now an integral part of the broad academic conversation in the fields of interreligious studies and comparative theology, as attested by the ongoing popularity and a growing number of interest groups at professional organizations such as the American Academy of Religion or the Catholic Theological Society of America. The Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies in North America and the European Network of Buddhist Christian Studies in Europe continue to foster academic conversation and exchange, and, as attested by this year’s News and Views section, the emergence of religious studies and interreligious dialogue in the Chinese academic world appears to be a promising development. Indeed, not only does the conversation take place at a speculative or theoretical level, but in an international context simultaneously marked by increasing secularism and religious violence, Buddhism and Christianity also offer a locus of resistance to a world where economic instability and intensifying climate change contribute to what is a de facto globalization of insecurity. At the same time, recent work in postcolonial approaches to the comparative study of religion has begun to impact religious dialogue by drawing attention to the history of the terms and assumptions that frame our questions. The journal hopes to continue to play an important role in bringing together some of the more important voices and contributions to this ongoing conversation and sharing them with the broader academic community.”

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