Author Archives: pwilson6

Korean Studies, Volume 42, (2018)

Identities Surrounding a Cenotaph for Korean Atomic Bomb Victims
by Yuko Takahashi

KS42

The Cenotaph for Korean Atomic Bomb Victims. Clockwise from top left: the front, back, right, and left sides. (Photos taken by author.)

In 1970, the Cenotaph for Korean Atomic Bomb Victims was erected in Hiroshima by local Koreans, most of whom were associated with South Korea. In the 1980s, this cenotaph gradually came to be seen as discriminatory against Koreans due to its location outside the Peace Memorial Park. In the 1990s, Hiroshima City and the two major organizations of Japanese-resident Koreans (zainichi Koreans), pro-South Korean Mindan and pro-North Korean Sōren, began negotiations to create a “unified” cenotaph that would be moved inside the Park. However, discussions reached a deadlock due to the rivalry between Mindan and Sōren, and also an internal split that occurred within Mindan. This paper will examine why the debate on the relocation of the cenotaph reached a deadlock in the 1990s, with a focus on the identity of zainichi Koreans. While Mindan and Sōren have their own collective identities, each individual zainichi Korean may identify oneself on various levels, from social to personal. An individual’s social identity develops through belonging to and participating in activities of social organizations. Given the rivalry between Mindan and Sōren, one’s social identity will be influenced by whether one is involved with Mindan or Sōren. In contrast, his/her personal identity may develop through more personal experiences and generally transcends the simple Mindan-Sōren division. The analysis will show that the relocation debate was caused by these various identities, which manifested and became dominant depending on context, leading to consonance or dissonance both between and within organizations.

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China Review International Vol. 23 No. 2 (2016)

Volume 23 #2 of China Review International begins with two featured reviews and a response, along with 20 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese studies.

FEATURES

RESPONSE

REVIEWS

…plus 15 more reviews and works received.


Browse the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


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About the Journal

Every quarter, China Review International presents timely, English-language reviews of recently published China-related books and monographs. Its multidisciplinary scope and international coverage make it an indispensable tool for all those interested in Chinese culture and civilization, and enable the sinologist to keep abreast of cutting-edge scholarship in Chinese studies.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

China Review International publishes reviews of recent scholarly literature and “state-of-the-art” articles in all fields of Chinese studies. Reviews are generally published by invitation only; however, unsolicited reviews will be considered for publication based on merit and guidelines can be found here.

UH Press Distributes Asian / Pacific Island Nursing Journal

The University of Hawai‘i Press now distributes the digital open-access journal, Asian / Pacific Island Nursing Journal published by the Asian American / Pacific Islander Nurses Association, Inc. (AAPINA). The complete content of the journal is freely available online at https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/apin/.

cover image Asian / Pacific Island Nursing Journal Edited by Jillian Inouye, PhD, FAAN from the University of Hawai‘i, School of Nursing & Dental Hygiene, the Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal is the only journal focused specifically on health and health care of and for this population. The journal features research papers, empirical and theoretical articles, editorials, abstracts of recent dissertations, and conference summaries that relate to nursing care written by scientists and researchers in nursing and the social sciences.

“We are pleased to assist AAPINA in the production and distribution of this important open-access journal,” said Joel Cosseboom, UH Press interim director.

The Asian / Pacific Island Nursing Journal joins UH Press’s extensive list of Hawaiian and Pacific Island studies titles, including The Hawaiian Journal of History, The Contemporary Pacific, and Pacific Science. The journal also joins three other peer-reviewed, open-access journal offerings: Language Documentation and Conservation, Palapala: a journal for Hawaiian language and literature and the Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society.

About UH PressUH Press Logo

 The University of Hawai‘i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. It strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Hawaiian, Pacific, Asian American and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai‘i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

About AAPINA

 AAPINA serves as the unified voice for Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) nurses around the world. AAPINA strives to positively affect the health and well-being of AAPIs and their communities by:

  1. supporting AAPI nurses and nursing students around the world through research, practice, and education;
  2. facilitating and promoting networking and collaborative partnerships; and
  3. influencing health policy through individual and community actions.

 

Language Documentation & Conservation Vol. 12 (March) 2018 -New Content

bowern.pdf - Adobe Acrobat Pro
New uploads have been added to the latest edition of the National Foreign Language Resource Center’s free and open-access journal Language Documentation & Conservation volume 12.

Articles

The endangered state of Negidal: A field report
Brigitte Pakendorf & Natalia Aralova, pp. 1-14

Orthography development for Darma (The case that wasn’t)
Christina Willis Oko, pp. 15–46

Review of Tone in Yongning Na: Lexical tones and morphotonology (Studies in Diversity Linguistics 13)
Maria Konoshenko, pp. 47–52

Contact languages around the world and their levels of endangerment
Nala H. Lee, pp. 53–79

Forced Alignment for Understudied Language Varieties: Testing Prosodylab-Aligner with Tongan Data
Lisa M. Johnson, Marianna Di Paolo & Adrian Bell, pp. 80–123

Kratylos: A tool for sharing interlinearized and lexical data in diverse formats
Daniel Kaufman & Raphael Finkel, pp. 124–146

Single-event Rapid Word Collection workshops: Efficient, effective, empowering
Brenda H. Boerger & Verna Stutzman, pp. 147–193

Review of Lakota Grammar Handbook : a pedagogically orientated self-study reference and practice book for beginner to upper-intermediate students
Bruce Ingham, pp. 194–203


Find the full text of the issue at the LD&C webpage


About the Journal

Language Documentation & Conservation is a free open-access journal on issues related to language documentation and revitalization.

Submissions

Instructions for submission can be found on the Language Documentation & Conservation‘s website.

Subscribe- Open Access

Although Language Documentation & Conservation is a free online journal, subscribers are notified by email when a new issue is released. Subscribe to LD&C here.

U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal, no. 52 (2017)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

The U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal (number 52) features the following scholarly works:

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Journal of Daoist Studies, Vol. 11 (2018)

The 2018 issue of JDS includes the following five articles::

A Daoist Exploration of Shenming
by Sharon Small

Losing What “Me”? An Existentialist Look at the Ego in the Zhuangzi
by Gabriele Libera

Daoist Seals, Part 2: Classifying Different Types
by Shih-Shan Susan Huang

Immortals and Alchemists: Spirit-Writing and Self-Cultivation in Ming Daoism
by Ilia Mozias

Daoist Ritual Manuals in Vietnam: Self-Cultivation, Cosmic Steps, and Healing Talismans
by Ekaterina Zavidovskaia

The following sections also appear in volume 11 (2018):


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE

Readers may receive free e-mail alerts of new content posted online: sign up here.


About the Journal

The Journal of Daoist Studies (JDS) is an annual publication dedicated to the scholarly exploration of Daoism in all its different dimensions. Each issue has three main parts: Academic Articles on history, philosophy, art, society, and more (limit 8,500 words); Forum on Contemporary Practice on issues of current activities both in China and other parts of the world (limit 5,000 words); and News of the Field, presenting publications, dissertations, conferences and websites.

Subscriptions

Annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions are available here.  Subscribers receive online access to the complete back content of the journal.jds 2016

Submissions

To submit your manuscript, please contact us at daojournal@gmail.com. Articles are reviewed by two anonymous readers and accepted after approval. A model file with editorial instructions is available upon request. Deadline for articles is September 1 for publication in February of the following year. More information is available at the journal’s website.

Journal of Korean Religions, vol. 8, no. 2 (October 2017)

Journal of Korean Religions vol. 8, no. 2, a special issue on Religion and Media in Korea, features the following articles by scholars.

Special Issue: Religion and Media in Korea

Guest Editors: Kyuhoon Cho, Sam Han, and Jin Kyu Park

In contemporary social life, religion and media cannot be said to be separated. Contrary to the long-lasting understanding that the two are independent from each other, the spheres of religion and media are closely intertwined. Dynamic and increasing connections have been observed and reported by a range of scholars. Indeed, the scholarly interest in the relationship is a fairly recent one. Only thirty years ago, religion was just a blind spot within media studies (Hoover and Venturelli 1996). Similarly, media were an overlooked issue in religious studies.

Special issue articles include:

  • A History of Religious Broadcasting in Korea from a Religious Politics Standpoint: Focusing on the Period of a Protestant Broadcasting Monopoly
    by Sungmin Lee
  • The Role of Newspapers in the Early Korean Protestant Community: An Analysis of The Korean Christian Advocate and The Christian News
    by Minjung Noh
  • Religion in the Press: The Construction of Religion in the Korean News Media
    by Kyuhoon Cho
  • The Culture-Religion Nexus: (Neo-)Durkheimianism and Mediatized Confucianism in Korean “Piety Travel”
    by Sam Han
  • Authenticity, Brand Culture, and Templestay in the Digital Era: The Ambivalence and In-Betweenness of Korean Buddhism
    by Seung Soo Kim

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