Author Archives: pwilson6

U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal, no. 52 (2017)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

The U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal (number 52) features the following scholarly works:

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Journal of Daoist Studies, Vol. 11 (2018)

The 2018 issue of JDS includes the following five articles::

A Daoist Exploration of Shenming
by Sharon Small

Losing What “Me”? An Existentialist Look at the Ego in the Zhuangzi
by Gabriele Libera

Daoist Seals, Part 2: Classifying Different Types
by Shih-Shan Susan Huang

Immortals and Alchemists: Spirit-Writing and Self-Cultivation in Ming Daoism
by Ilia Mozias

Daoist Ritual Manuals in Vietnam: Self-Cultivation, Cosmic Steps, and Healing Talismans
by Ekaterina Zavidovskaia

The following sections also appear in volume 11 (2018):

Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE

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About the Journal

The Journal of Daoist Studies (JDS) is an annual publication dedicated to the scholarly exploration of Daoism in all its different dimensions. Each issue has three main parts: Academic Articles on history, philosophy, art, society, and more (limit 8,500 words); Forum on Contemporary Practice on issues of current activities both in China and other parts of the world (limit 5,000 words); and News of the Field, presenting publications, dissertations, conferences and websites.


Annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions are available here.  Subscribers receive online access to the complete back content of the journal.jds 2016


To submit your manuscript, please contact us at Articles are reviewed by two anonymous readers and accepted after approval. A model file with editorial instructions is available upon request. Deadline for articles is September 1 for publication in February of the following year. More information is available at the journal’s website.

Journal of Korean Religions, vol. 8, no. 2 (October 2017)

Journal of Korean Religions vol. 8, no. 2, a special issue on Religion and Media in Korea, features the following articles by scholars.

Special Issue: Religion and Media in Korea

Guest Editors: Kyuhoon Cho, Sam Han, and Jin Kyu Park

In contemporary social life, religion and media cannot be said to be separated. Contrary to the long-lasting understanding that the two are independent from each other, the spheres of religion and media are closely intertwined. Dynamic and increasing connections have been observed and reported by a range of scholars. Indeed, the scholarly interest in the relationship is a fairly recent one. Only thirty years ago, religion was just a blind spot within media studies (Hoover and Venturelli 1996). Similarly, media were an overlooked issue in religious studies.

Special issue articles include:

  • A History of Religious Broadcasting in Korea from a Religious Politics Standpoint: Focusing on the Period of a Protestant Broadcasting Monopoly
    by Sungmin Lee
  • The Role of Newspapers in the Early Korean Protestant Community: An Analysis of The Korean Christian Advocate and The Christian News
    by Minjung Noh
  • Religion in the Press: The Construction of Religion in the Korean News Media
    by Kyuhoon Cho
  • The Culture-Religion Nexus: (Neo-)Durkheimianism and Mediatized Confucianism in Korean “Piety Travel”
    by Sam Han
  • Authenticity, Brand Culture, and Templestay in the Digital Era: The Ambivalence and In-Betweenness of Korean Buddhism
    by Seung Soo Kim

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Religion and Philosophy Journals from the University of Hawai`i Press

00_BCS 37_c1 and c4_REVA scholarly journal devoted to Buddhism and Christianity and their historical and contemporary interrelationships, Buddhist-Christian Studies presents thoughtful articles, conference reports, and book reviews. It also includes sections on comparative methodology and historical comparisons, as well as ongoing discussions from two dialogue conferences: the Theological Encounter with Buddhism, and the Japan Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies.

Submission guidelines for BCS are available online. 


jdsThe Journal of Daoist Studies (JDS) is an annual publication dedicated to the scholarly exploration of Daoism in all its different dimensions. Each issue has three main parts: Academic Articles on history, philosophy, art,society, and more (limit 8,500 words); Forum on Contemporary Practice on issues of current activities both in China and other parts of the world (limit 5,000 words); and News of the Field, presenting publications, dissertations, conferences and websites.

For submission guidelines please contact


jksThe Journal of Korean Religions is the only English-language academic journal dedicated to the study of Korean religions. It aims to stimulate interest in and research on Korean religions across a range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Launched in 2010 by the Institute for the Study of Religion at Sogang University in Korea, it is peer-reviewed and published twice yearly, in April and October.

Submission guidelines for JKR are available online.


Promoting academic literacy on non-Western traditions of philosophy, Philosophy East PEWand West has for over half a century published the highest-quality scholarship that locates these cultures in their relationship to Anglo-American philosophy. Philosophy defined in its relationship to cultural traditions broadly integrates the professional discipline with literature, science, and social practices. Each issue includes debates on issues of contemporary concern and critical reviews of the most recent publications.

Submission guidelines for PEW are available online.



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Call for Papers: Palapala


Palapala: a journal for Hawaiian language and literature seeks papers for forthcoming volumes. Read the complete call for papers from the editors below:

Aloha Kākou!

Palapala is Hawaiʻi’s first academic, peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the study of and literature produced in ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi. Following the online release of our first volume, we are eager to call for new submissions for future annual editions. Our first volume can be accessed online for free through the following link: Palapala Vol. 1

Palapala journal comes to us at a time when despite a growing number of speakers and academic work being produced in Hawaiian, there are few avenues through which scholars can share their research within a centralized, peer-reviewed archive dedicated to their language of study. Though Hawaiian is one of the most well-preserved indigenous languages in the world today, few outside of Hawaiʻi think to give it the scholarly attention it deserves, and there is still much archival information left for us to discover. It is our hope that Palapala will create a shift in this trend, and help bring Hawaiian and Hawaiian literature back to the forefront of scholarship, particularly in Hawaiʻi schools, but also throughout the academic world. Those eager to study Hawaiian language and culture should have more access to academically-credible, peer-reviewed works, which Palapala hopes to produce and provide for the community of scholars interested in na mea Hawaiʻi. It is our ambition that with this journal, we can continue to expand our knowledge of ancestral Hawaiʻi, and share that ʻike with the global community.

Palapala currently solicits three types of contributions:

  1. New research on Hawaiian language and literature.
  2. Book reviews on significant new books as well as books that have been widely used as references for people working in Hawaiian.
  3. Important reprints of newspaper and journal articles that continue to be important for new research, whether from the Hawaiian language newspapers or from other sources that are now difficult to access.

Palapala prints articles in Hawaiian, English, and, if we can find peer reviewers, other languages. Anyone interested in contributing as an author or peer-reviewer may address an email to the editors at Please note that the annual deadline for submissions is September 1.

In honor of the many kupuna who strove to preserve Hawaiian language during its time of adversary, we look forward to embarking on this important voyage towards a better future for ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi.

Submission guidelines: Submissions (research articles and reviews) must be original works not scheduled for publication by another publisher or original work for which the contributor has received all necessary permissions to republish as open access. Reprints of important articles may also be submitted. Please send proposals or full-length articles for consideration to the editors at

Manuscripts must be provided in Word doc format with all images and tables extracted as separate files. Please format all manuscript notes as endnotes and refer to the 16th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style for citations and style guidelines. Please see the University of Hawai‘i Press Manuscript Guidelines for more details.

Upon acceptance, contributors will be asked to sign a publication agreement with University of Hawai‘i Press, and all content in Palapala is published under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture, vol. 10 (2017)

az image 10

Candle Light Protest, 12 November 2016, Gwanghwamun Square, Seoul. Images From Chung Taek Yong in this issue of Azalea.

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture volume 10 features the following writings, poetry, and artwork:


David R. McCann
Editor’s Note

I am bringing ten years’ association with AZALEA journal to an end with this essay, this issue. I am so very grateful to Young-Jun Lee, whose creation the journal was, is, and will always be, and also
to the translators, authors, and literary scholars in Korea, North
America, and around the globe who have contributed their work
to this effort. For Harvard University’s Korea Institute, which has
provided staff, office space, storage closets and shelves, and above all
a spirit of dedication to the field, my gratitude is immense. Finally,
my thanks to the International Communications Foundation of
Seoul, which has provided both financial support over the years and
encouragement for the effort here and in meetings in Korea on the
subject and the project.

Writer in Focus: Kim Sagwa

Bruce Futlon

Kim Sagwa

Strange and Ominous Presentiments

P’ul Recumbent

Speaking of Disdain
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Trans-Humanities Journal

cover trans humanitiesTrans-Humanities publishes materials that expand humanities research to include contemporary cultural and sociological phenomena and to open an academic and discursive space for trans-boundary and multi or trans-disciplinary approaches and communications, not just in the humanities but also the social sciences, the natural sciences, and the arts.

Read for free all three issues of volume 8, 2015 – on Project MUSE

Articles in volume 8 include:

Living in Difficult Times: New Materialist Subject/ivity and Be coming of Posthuman Life by Jajati K. Pradhan and Seema Singh (8#1)

Revising the Human in Samuel Beckett’s Aesthetic Education by
Kelly S. Walsh (8#1)

Special Topic: Fields of Modern Knowledge and Journalism (8#3)

Blade Runner and the Right to Life by Eli Park Sorensen

When Private Life Became Political: German Politicians, Sex Scandals, and Mass Media, 1880–1914  by Frank Bösch

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