Author Archives: Emily Benton

UH Press to publish Rapa Nui Journal

Rapa Nui Journal

UH Press will renew publication of the Rapa Nui Journal in a new partnership with the Easter Island Foundation.

University of Hawai`i Press is pleased to announce a new partnership with the Easter Island Foundation for the continued publication of the Rapa Nui Journal.

Founded in 1989, the Easter Island Foundation (EIF) provides a forum for a variety of programs and activities designed to promote awareness of Easter Island’s unique heritage and to further knowledge of the vast region of Oceania. Members receive a print and electronic subscription to the Rapa Nui Journal.

“We are very excited to work with the Easter Island Foundation to publish Rapa Nui Journal and to assist in managing their membership process,” said Pamela Wilson, Journals Manager at UH Press. “We look forward to connecting with Foundation members and bringing their journal to a larger audience.”

Rapa Nui Journal (RNJ) serves as a forum for interdisciplinary scholarship in the humanities and social sciences on Easter Island and the Eastern Polynesian region. Abstracts for RNJ articles are published in English, Spanish or Rapanui.

Through UH Press, content from the journal may now be read online at Project MUSE. Readers may also receive free e-mail alerts of new RNJ content posted online: sign up here.

“As a nonprofit publisher known for our publications in Pacific Island studies, we feel particularly compatible with the mission of the Easter Island Foundation,” said Joel Cosseboom, UH Press Interim Director and Publisher.

As part of the agreement, UH Press will offer the Foundation assistance with managing its member database, journal archives, marketing, subscriptions, warehousing and shipping. EIF memberships, RNJ subscriptions, and RNJ contributor guidelines may be found on the UH Press website.

“The Easter Island Foundation is pleased to be welcomed into the family of publications of the University of Hawai’i Press as they assume the publication of the Rapa Nui Journal,” said David L. Rose, President of the Easter Island Foundation. “Rapa Nui Journal has a long history of supporting the publication and dissemination of Polynesian research starting with the hand-typed Rapa Nui Notes over 30 years ago. From that humble beginning, the Rapa Nui Journal became a strong, peer-reviewed voice of research about Rapa Nui and Polynesia. We look forward to a long and successful partnership with UH Press as we begin this next phase of the Rapa Nui Journal.”

RNJ joins other established Pacific Island studies journals published by UH Press, including The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island AffairsAsian Perspectives: The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific and Oceanic Linguistics.

For more details, please contact Journals Manager Pamela Wilson at (808) 956-6790 or pwilson6@hawaii.edu.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.


EIFlogoThe Easter Island Foundation was originally founded to create a research library on Rapa Nui to house the collections of anthropologist William Mulloy and to encourage study and research about the island. The Foundation provides a forum for a variety of programs and activities designed to further knowledge about Easter Island and Oceania. Programs include a scholarship program that provides financial aid to assist students of Rapanui ancestry with their college education, as well as the publication of the Rapa Nui Journal, which fulfills the foundation’s mission to promote, stimulate, and disseminate research on Easter Island and other Polynesian islands by members of scientific, historical, and cultural disciplines. The Easter Island Foundation is a non-profit 501(3)(c) organization. Donations may be made directly to the Easter Island Foundation, P.O. Box 6774, Los Osos, CA 93412-6774 . Phone: (805)-528-8558.

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Spring 2018 Biography Brown Bag Series

The editors of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly and directors of the Center for Biographical Research at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa have released their Spring 2018 schedule of Biography Brown Bags.

If you’re in Hawai’i, mark your calendars and BYOL (bring your own lunch) to these exciting discussions about life writing. Unless otherwise noted, the following brown bags are held from noon to 1:15 p.m. Thursdays in Kuykendall Room 409-A at UH Mānoa. Click here for visitor parking information.

February 1: “Themes in the Narratives by Escapees from the Holocaust in WWII Italy.”
Luciano Minerbi, Dept. of Urban and Regional Planning, UH-Mānoa

February 8: “Constructing Post-Soviet Stardom: Auteur and the state in the case of Renata Litvinova.” Olga Mukhortova, Languages and Literatures of Europe and the Americas, UH Mānoa

February 15: “Writing With Not About: Constellating Stories in Auto-ethnography.”
John Gagnon, Dept. of English, UH-Mānoa

February 22: “Masters of the Currents: Theater, Community, and Social Change.”
Leilani Chan and Ova Saopeng, TeAda Productions

March 1*: “Island Soldiers: Living with Militarization in Micronesia.” Pacific Island Student Panel co-organized by the Marianas Club, for Mes Chamoru and Nuclear Remembrance Day. Moderated by Craig Santos Perez.
*This session will be held in Kuykendall Room 410

March 8: “Hulahula and Learn Something: Expressing Culture and Science.” Kiana Frank, Pacific Biosciences Research Center, UH-Mānoa

March 15: “Selling It Like It Is: The Value of Narrative in Business and Policy.” Amanda Rothschild, Dept. of Urban and Regional Planning, UH-Mānoa

March 22: “An Introduction to the Jon Van Dyke Archive at the UHM Law Library.” Ellen-Rae Cachola, William S. Richardson School of Law, UH-Mānoa

April 5: “Losing Don Belton: Meditations on Friendship, Murder, and Race, and the Ethics of Life Writing.” Mara Miller, Visiting Scholar with the Center for Biographical Research and Dept. of English, UH-Mānoa

April 12: “Al Harrington: Reflections on Genealogy, Acting, and a Polynesian Revue.” Al Harrington, Educator, Actor, and Entertainer

April 19: “Filling the Void: Creating Playing Space for Today’s Pacific Islander.”
Kiki Rivera, Dept. of Theatre and Dance, UH-Mānoa

Apr 26*: “Exploring the Vā in the Oral Sharing of Poetry.” Grace Teuila Taylor, Visiting Writer in Residence, Dept. of English, UH-Mānoa
*This session will be held in Kuykendall Room 410

See flyer below or visit CBR’s Facebook page for more details.

Spring 2018 Biography Brown Bag Flyer


Read Biography archives at Project MUSE


Sign up to receive e-mail alerts about Biography new issues from Project MUSE

 

Interview: The Contemporary Pacific editor Alexander Mawyer

Alexander Mawyer‘s passion for Pacific Island studies is contagious​, and has led him to a prolific career in Hawai`i and abroad​. As a graduate of the University of Hawai`i at Mānoa and the University of Chicago, he has conducted research with the Mangarevan community in the Gambier and Society Islands of French Polynesia. He has also served as coeditor of Varua Tupu: New Writing from French Polynesia and contributed a chapter for the UH Press volume At Home and in the Field: Ethnographic Encounters in Asia and the Pacific Islands. As an associate professor, he has worked on research involving the languages of Eastern Polynesia and sovereignty issues, and has served as co-director of the Biocultural Initiative of the Pacific in Oceania at UH Mānoa. With Mawyer now at the helm as editor upon its 30th anniversary, and with the launch of a new website for the journal, we asked him to share his approach to gleaning and organizing the content for The Contemporary Pacific

Photo on 1-18-18 at 11.37 AM

What led you to become an editor in this field?

What a striking question! You make me think of Borges’s garden of forking paths, wherein stories ramify, intersect, cross over and back, and all paths turn out to have many beginnings and few, if any, evident ends . . . still a few thoughts come to mind. In the summer after college, I found myself in Honolulu and, among other things, volunteering as an editorial assistant for MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, which Frank Stewart and Robbie (Robert) Shapard had founded some years earlier.

Looking back, that was a serendipitous moment. Still in its first decade, I happened to be present while MĀNOA was coming into its own with growing national and international recognition. I got to know passionately committed local thinkers and writers such as Mahealani Dudoit, who founded ‘Oiwi: A Native Hawaiian Journal in 1999 and who was very often in MĀNOA’s offices in those years. I was trained as an editorial assistant and later as assistant to the managing editor by the inimitable and formidable Pat Matsueda. Frank, Pat, Mahealani, and others on the staff and around at the time were inspiring for their commitment to the ethical imagination and the transformative potential of the inked page.

At some point during my first months with MĀNOA, Frank asked me to write a review of Vilsoni Hereniko’s then freshly published Woven Gods. Vili, a professor at the Center for Pacific Islands Studies, had just edited an issue of MĀNOA dedicated to Oceanic and Pacific Islander writers and writing. At the time, this literary space was almost entirely out of view for those not themselves seizing the pen in home islands and communities. I suppose my review was not a complete disaster since Frank suggested that Vili would enjoy lunching and chatting about my review. As I discovered, Vili’s scholarly spirit expands to fill whatever space he’s in and, somehow, by the end of that lunch he had more or less talked me into doing an MA in Pacific Islands Studies.

A year later, after my MA, I moved to Chicago for my doctorate and did not imagine (and, I think, could not have imagined) that I would ever have the privilege of serving as the editor of The Contemporary Pacific. I am confident that any number of other more recent experiences could be identified as part of the story-garden for how I came to take on this editorship. But in retrospect, I’m struck by how early career experiences play out over years, by how unexpectedly paths cross and re-cross, and by how the kindness of intellectual and professional mentorship was a planting that continues to flower and bear fruit.

Continue reading

The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 30 no. 1 (2018)

Artwork by Maika'i Tubbs, featured in this issue

Next Show in Fifteen Minutes, by Maika’i Tubbs, 2008. The Hawaiians (1970 book by authors Gavan Daws and Ed Sheehan and photographer Robert B Goodman), 15″ x 10″ x 8″. Photo courtesy of the artist. Next Show in Fifteen Minutes is a performance that looks at stereotypical depictions of Native Hawaiians and expectations sometimes placed on them to perform “on command.” In this performance, Tubbs picks up a book from a pedestal, opens it, and folds the pages into a circus tent while singing in Hawaiian. He then unfolds the pages, closes the book, and repeats the performance after fifteen minutes.

This issue of The Contemporary Pacific includes a scholarly resource from the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa Library for “Making Pacific Languages Discoverable;” political reviews covering Polynesia and Micronesia; the work of artist and UH Mānoa grad Maika’i Tubbs; and the following articles and media reviews:

Articles

Book and Media Reviews


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


00_30.1 cover_FINAL_RGBAbout the Journal

The Contemporary Pacific provides a publication venue for interdisciplinary work in Pacific studies with the aim of providing informed discussion of contemporary issues in the Pacific Islands region.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Submissions must be original works not previously published and not under consideration or scheduled for publication by another publisher. Manuscripts should be 8,000 to 10,000 words, or no more than 40 double-spaced pages, including references. Find submission guidelines here.

Journal of World History, vol. 28, nos. 3 & 4 (2017)

Excerpt from La Vie Indo-Chinoise

Japanese sex workers occupied a special place in the desires and fantasies of French colonial men in Asia as seen in ‘Our Hungarians,’ La Vie Indo-Chinoise, November 13, 1897. From “Sex and the Colonial City” in this issue.

Journal of World History volume 28, numbers 3&4 is a special double issue guest edited by Tracey Rizzo on Gender and Empire. It includes more than 400 pages of articles and book reviews from world history scholars.

From the Editor’s Introduction:

Gender and Empire as a subfield of world history goes beyond the study of the men and women who made and unmade empires. Intimacies generated ties that facilitated or impeded the modernization of family and nation, demarcating contact zones. Bodies–adorned, fetishized, public–displayed and negotiated imperial relations. Detritus, the material remains of empire and intimacy, lodged itself in the institutions and discourses of modernity. When world historians talk across boundaries and borders, we situate disjointed ruins in broader trends and patterns, without which they are mere curiosities. Assembled here: a Chinese scalp; a silver buckle from Malaya; a bawdy cartoon from Hanoi; a hybrid recipe from Nigeria; dossiers from Lebanon and El Salvador; government orders promoting or suppressing prostitution… Confined to a national or even imperial history, such fragments do not tell us anything about coloniality. Here they do.

Articles

Plus five more articles, 13 book reviews, books received, and the volume index.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


JWH28_3-4_cover1About the Journal

The Journal of World History publishes research into historical questions requiring the investigation of evidence on a global, comparative, cross-cultural, or transnational scale. It is devoted to the study of phenomena that transcend the boundaries of single states, regions, or cultures, such as large-scale population movements, long-distance trade, cross-cultural technology transfers, and the transnational spread of ideas.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the World History Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

The Journal of World History is proud to introduce a new article and peer review submission system, accessible now at at jwh.msubmit.net.

Early Release Articles: Korean Studies (January 2018)

University of Hawai’i Press and Korean Studies present the following early release articles through a partnership with Project MUSE.

EARLY RELEASE ARTICLE

The Problem of Sovereign Succession in Confucian Ritual Discourse: Constitutional Thought of Reconciliation between Fact and Value by Moowon Cho

EARLY RELEASE BOOK REVIEW

Curative Violence: Rehabilitating Disability, Gender, and Sexuality in Modern Korea by Eunjung Kim (Duke University Press, 2017) reviewed by Sonja M. Kim

All Korean Studies early release articles may be viewed online here.

Please note: Early release manuscripts have been through our rigorous peer-review process, accepted for publication, and copyedited. These articles will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal. These articles have not yet been through the full production process and therefore may contain errors. These articles will be removed from the early release page once they are published as part of an issue.

The next complete volume of Korean Studies will appear in 2018. Sign up for new issue email alerts from Project MUSE here.

Pacific Science, vol. 72, no. 1 (January 2018)

A blue shark

A blue shark (Prionace glauca) caught by a Japanese research vessel in the western North Pacific Ocean. Fujinami et al. (this issue) analyzed feeding habits of blue sharks in the Northwestern Pacific. Photo credit: Akira Kurashima, National Research Institute of Far Seas Fisheries.

Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, begins 2018 with new research on sharks, dolphins, cats, and more biological and physical studies. Preview volume 72, number 1 below and find a list of all articles available on Bio-One and Project MUSE.

Contents

  • Loss of Reservoir Capacity through Sedimentation in Hawai‘i: Management Implications for the Twenty-First Century by Kim Falinski and David Pen

  • Feeding Habits of the Blue Shark (Prionace glauca) in the Northwestern Pacific Based on Stomach Contents and Stable Isotope Ratios by Yuki Fujinami, Sayaka Nakatsuka, and Seiji Ohshimo

  • Presence, Behavior, and Resighting Pattern of Transient Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in the Humboldt Current System off North-Central Chile by Macarena Santos-Carvallo, Maritza Sepúlveda, Rodrigo Moraga, Mauricio F. Landaeta, Doris Oliva, and María José Pérez-Alvarez

  • Modeling Impacts of Hunting on Control of an Insular Feral Cat Population by Brian T. Leo, James J. Anderson, James Ha, Reese B. Phillips, and Renee R. Ha

  • Resource Availability, Propagule Supply, and Effect of Nonnative Ungulate Herbivores on Senecio madagascariensis Invasion by Erin J. Questad, Amanda Uowolo, Sam Brooks, Robert Fitch, and Susan Cordell

…plus more articles and Association Affairs from the PSA.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


Pacific Science 72:1

Pacific Science vol. 72, no. 1 (January 2018)

About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.