Category Archives: Asian Theatre Journal

#LookItUP: Minority Voices in UHP Journals

 

upweekiconThis is Part 4 in a series of University of Hawai`i Press blog posts celebrating University Press Week and highlighting scholarship published by UH Press journals in the past year. Read our introductory blog post here. Our hope is that this series will shed new light on how UH Press “sells the facts,” so to speak, and the value our 24 journals bring to our very existence. Links to each journal and article are provided below.*


Minority Voices

U.S. -Japan Women’s JournalNumber 51, 2017usjwj
Article:
 “Building a Feminist Scholarly Community: Fifty-One Issues of U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal” by Jan Bardsley

Context: Like many of our scholarly journals, U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal is a community of minority voices in and of itself. This volume celebrates 50 issues of bringing women’s studies and scholars together across international boundaries.

 

 

aza

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and CultureVolume 10, 2017
Special Section: Writer in Focus: Kim Sagwa

Context: Azalea presents five pieces by Korean author Kim Sagwa, who was able to complete her first novel under the United States an Alien of Extraordinary Ability in the Arts visa in 2016. One must wonder, given the tide change in immigrant policies and arts funding under the current administration, if such visas will be available for international artists in the future.

 

bio

Biography: An Interdisciplinary QuarterlyVolume 39, Number 4, Fall 2016
Special Section: International Year in Review

Context: Biography launched a new annual section that provides reports on life writing from across the world. This new venue gives us a lens by which to see global shifts in personal identity, from authors writing out of the U.K.’s Brexit to memoirists lyrically documenting the U.S.’s transgender community to historical biographers nostalgic for pre-1949 Republican China.

 

Trans-Humanities JournalVolume 10, Number 1, 2017th
Article: “Mapping the Terrain of New Black Fatherhood in Contemporary African American Literature” by Set-Byul Moon

Context: Literature can bridge the great divide between knowing and understanding, and this article looks at how the African American father has been developed against negative stereotypes through the writings of “Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, and Toni Morrison to contemporary — and relatively young — authors such as Leonard Pitts Jr. and Bernice L. McFadden.”

 

Asian Theatre JournalVolume 34, Number 1, Spring 2017atj
Special Section: Founders in the Field

Context: Asian Theatre Journal‘s Spring 2017 issue highlights three founders in the field–all women: Rachel Cooper, Kathy Foley, and Carol Fisher Sorgenfrei. Editor Kathy Foley also makes this charge to reviewers: “To become a truly international journal, cross-border research that does not always detour to Western thinking is much needed. It is limiting when authors feel they have to routinely apply Western tropes of gender, class, or aesthetics.”

 

Oregon beautiful picture

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics SocietyVolume 10, 2017
Section: Submission Guidelines

Context: This journal stands out for not only making new research in the field of Southeast Asian linguistics available for free via open-access publishing, but for its commitment to the peer review process, which ensures the publication of accurate information. From its submission guidelines: “Each original article undergoes double-blind review by at least two scholars, usually a member of the [JSEALS] Advisory Board and one or more independent referees.”

 

cri

China Review International: A Journal of Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese StudiesVolume 22, Number 1, 2015
Article:
“Review of Ka-ming Wu’s Reinventing Chinese Tradition: The Cultural Politics of Late Socialism (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2015)” by Nyíri Pál

Context: New scholarship benefits from criticism, and in this issue of China Review International (published in 2017), reviewer Nyíri Pál offers a fresh analysis of Chinese folk traditions in light of economic developments and recent ethnographic studies of “culture workers.”

 

*Institutional access to online aggregators such as Project MUSE may be required for full-text reading. For access questions, please see the Project MUSE FAQ available here or contact your local library.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu. To receive table-of-contents email alerts for these publications, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.

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Asian Theatre Journal, vol. 34, no. 2 (2017)

From this issue’s color insert. Kannangat Bhagavathi at Muchilot Kavu, Valapattanam, Kannur District, January 2015. (Photo: Filipe Pereira)

The fall 2017 issue of the Asian Theatre Journal includes the following works:

TRANSLATIONS

Borrowing the Fan: An Example of Actable Plays (Zhezixi) for the Kunqu Stage
translated and introduced by Dongshin Chang

A Monk and a Nun Commit a Sin Together: Feng Weimin’s Play and Its Three Transformations
translated and introduced by Antonio Leggieri

ARTICLES

Identity Politics in Okinawan Kumiodori: Mekarushi and Hana no Maboroshi (Vision of Flowers)
by Ruth Forsythe

Drenched in Victory, Facing Drought: Staging Transitions in Myanmar’s Performing Arts
by Catherine Diamond

Ritual Liminality and Frame: What Did Barbosa See When He Saw the Theyyam?
by Filipe Pereiran

The Hall of Superabundant Blessings: Toward an Architecture of Chinese Ancestral-Temple Theatre
by Xiaohuan Zhao

Zhang Huoding: A Popular Jingju Star with Young Chinese
by Qinghuan Huang

Continue reading

Interview: Asian Theatre Review editor Kathy Foley

Later this year, Asian Theatre Journal editor Kathy Foley will step down from her post, which she’s held since 2004, and pass the baton onto current area editor, Siyuan Liu. Foley is a distinguished scholar, performer and director based out of the University of California, Santa Cruz, and has been engaged with the journal since “before it was born.” This summer, Foley shared with us the history of ATJ and highlights from her tenure with the journal.

Learn more about Foley in the recent “Founders of the Field” feature by Margaret J. Caldiron in ATJ Vol. 34, No. 1. A specialist in wayang golek (Indonesian rod puppets), Foley also shared her knowledge with the Asian Art Museum in this short video.

Kathy Foley leads a performance class at the University of Malaya during a Fulbright Senior Scholar grant in 2014. Students rehearse the wilderness scene from the Layla and Majnun story in Mughal Miniatures. (Photo courtesy of Kathy Foley)

Asian Theatre Journal launched in 1984 with an article written by you and, 20 years later, you took over the editorship from Samuel L. Leiter. Can you tell us about your history with the journal and what lead you to become editor of ATJ?

When I was a graduate student at UH and the East-West Center, I and my peers started a mimeographed Asian Theatre Reports, which brought together recent field research of graduate students studying Asian theatre. When East-West Center offered to upgrade this publication, James Brandon suggested instead a full peer-reviewed journal and went to UH Press with his proposal. Thus, in some ways, I feel I have been with journal since before it was born. To have followed in the footsteps of editors James Brandon with Elizabeth Wichmann-Walczak and Samuel Leiter—giants of our field—is an honor.

How has Asian Theatre Journal evolved over the years? And what issues are particularly relevant now?

As editor my quest has been to publish fundamental research. Arts and humanities in the American and European University often remain focused on the West—what happens in New York, London, Berlin, Paris is touted as “theatre.” Japan, China, and Singapore, as they developed economic clout, have gotten attention, but I want us to see that Dili and Naha are equally important; that more than the doings of the elite need attention. We need larger vistas. Aesthetic biodiversity, past and present, is important for humans. Art makers mount stages to expand our possibilities as a species. This journal is about widening visions—my own and I hope of readers, too.

In your first editor’s note, you wrote, “Knowledge is crossing oceans and leaping across generations. We are a joint community of teachers and learners.” Today, in addition to articles and translations, the journal features sections on “Emerging Scholars” as well as “Founders of the Field.” How would you describe your approach to editing ATJ?

Jim Brandon started ATJ with a focus on “traditional” forms. As Samuel Leiter came, contemporary play translations and papers by “Emerging Scholars” got space. During my time there has been increasing focus on urban contemporary forms and China has mushroomed. This is not because I dictate it—it comes with the “trends” of trans-national scholarship; gender issues, sexualities, postcolonial thrusts come from what is transpiring in both grad seminars and in the world. We definitely have become more global—graduate student cohorts and assistant professors hail from across the globe.

Kathy Foley (center) performs wayang golek sunda with the clown Semar (light face and black body) and his sons (Astrajingga behind Semar and Petruk facing him). Her puppetry graduate students Michael Schuster (foreground) and Shae Uisna (behind Foley) assist along with UCSC gamelan players. (Photo courtesy of Kathy Foley)

Siyuan Liu and David Jortner edited “Founders of the Field”; it was initially just a way to do more than just mark death of a single important Asian theatre scholar (Andy Tsubaki from University of Kansas). I suggested we talk to our forerunners while they were still around about how/why our field was formed. This “Founders” series ballooned, while seemingly “about” individuals, it really asks more—what is the evolving place of Asian theatre studies in the academy? How did World War II and the Occupation jumpstart our field by creating Japanist besotted with kabuki? How did the 1960s era give Southeast Asian or South Asian theatre focus? How has China after Mao allowed new studies? Looking at lineages is germane to our discipline—the guru, the sensei, the sifu—is “built in” to our training. The 10-week quarter or even the five-year PhD does not work in the same way. That Founder project asked, where do we come from and where are we heading? The next editor may not continue the series on actions and interactions, but will still keep a finger to the pulse.

This year, you pass the editorship onto Siyuan Liu. Looking back on a dozen years at the helm, is there an issue that you’re particularly proud of?

I think that some of the themed issues—Shakespeare in Asia, Kyogen, Malaysian Theatre, Women in Asian Theatre—have been useful, not only because they had good articles, but many of those editors have gone on to bigger editing jobs better prepared. Siyuan Liu, himself, became seasoned as an editor with the “Founders” and is now ready to do the whole.

Colleague Margaret J. Coldiron characterizes your scholarly work as “detailed, accessible, and passionate.” After ATJ, what’s next for you?

After ATJ I’m ready to focus on my own writing. I have so much research I have never really processed while performing, raising kids, administrating, and editing. James Brandon told me when I was a graduate student that single-point focus (then, the dissertation) was something I would seldom experience again. He was right. But Jim actually did his most important writing on kabuki after he passed off ATJ, I hope to follow his example and watch my “to do” list shrink.


About the Journal

Asian Theatre Journal is dedicated to the performing arts of Asia, focusing upon both traditional and modern theatrical forms. It aims to facilitate the exchange of knowledge throughout the international theatrical community for the mutual benefit of all interested scholars and artists. It is the official journal of the Association of Asian Performance.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Asian Theatre Journal welcomes articles on Asian theatre and on the relations and mutual influences between Asian and Western theatre. Find submission guidelines here.

Say hello to UH Press at AAS Booth 600

If you’re attending the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference in Toronto March 16-19, 2017, be sure to visit the University of Hawai’i Press at booth 600!

UH Press will have Asian studies books from our latest catalogs on display, as well as copies of the following journals:

We’re also proud to debut three online-only journals at AAS 2017:

Stop by and say hello as you browse through our display copies and catalogs. You may also pick up an order form at our booth or place your orders online at www.uhpress.hawaii.edu.

We look forward to seeing you in cold, snowy Toronto!

Asian Theatre Journal, vol. 34, no. 1 (2017)

From this issue of Asian Theatre Journal. The betraying husband Bryan (Greg Brostrom) cowers before the spirit of his avenging wife while her ancestress Oiwa cradles the couple’s child in Carol Fisher Sorgenfrei’s Ghost Light: The Haunting. (Photo: Courtesy of Carol Fisher Sorgenfrei)

The spring 2017 issue of the Asian Theatre Journal includes the following works:

ARTICLES

Wayang Kulit Kelantan: A Study of Characterization and Puppets
by Ghulam-Sarwar Yousof and Kheng-Kia Khor

Dramatizing Romance of the Three Kingdoms in Japanese Puppet Theatre: Zhuge Liang’s Military Talk on the Three Kingdoms
by Kai Xie

The Development of Indonesian Modern Theatre: Four Periods of Creativity from 1970 to 2015
by Benny Yohanes Timmerman

The Hilarity of Unhappiness in Oh Tae-suk’s Tempest: Cross-Cultural Access and Precolonial/Indigenous Aesthetics
by Kyounghye Kwon Continue reading

Asian Theatre Journal, vol. 33, no. 2 (2016)

The yueju production of The Good Person of Jiangnan presents the Haipai culture style, with its elaborate costumes and magnificent sets and props. (Photo: Zhejiang Xiao Baihua Yueju Company)

The fall 2016 edition of the Asian Theatre Journal includes the following works:

IN MEMORIAM

Celebration of Life for James R. Brandon by Elizabeth Wichmann-Walczak

Asep Sunandar Sunarya: Dalang of Wayang Golek Sunda (1955–2014) by Arthur S. Nalan

TRANSLATION

Timizi nu in (The Bond of Water in Hands): An Early Modern Ryūkyūan Kumi Odori, as Staged by the National Theatre Okinawa by James Rhys Edwards and Nakazato Masao Continue reading

Asian Theatre Journal, vol. 33, no. 1 (2016)

Plate 4. You and Me, directed by Zhang Yimou. (Photo: Courtesy of the Chinese Committee of the Sixth Theatre Olympics)

You and Me, directed by Zhang Yimou.
(Photo: Courtesy of the Chinese Committee of the Sixth Theatre Olympics)

The spring 2016 edition of the Asian Theatre Journal includes the following works:

The Cross Currents of Modern Theatre and China’s National Theatre Movement of 1925–1926 Siyuan Liu

The Eternal Thread: Gunsam Lee’s First Play in English
Wook-Dong Kim Continue reading