Category Archives: Biography

Biography Vol. 41 No. 1 (Winter 2018)

Photograph of Prince's star on the wall of the First Avenue nightclub in Minneapolis by Lizzy Shramko. Reproduced with permission.

Photograph of Prince’s star on the wall of the First Avenue nightclub in Minneapolis by Lizzy Shramko. Reproduced with permission.

Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly volume 41, number 1 (Winter 2018) arrives with a purple cover and includes a special section, On Prince: A Labor of Love, Loss, and Freedom, guest edited by Andreana Clay.

From the abstract:

With the death of Prince Rogers Nelson on April 21, 2016, many people’s lives were changed forever. In efforts both big and small, those of us left have tried to recall, feel deeply, and write down what his life and death meant to us individually and in community. This special feature explores the feelings of four writers—Andreana Clay, Greg Tate, Steven W. Thrasher, and Scott Poulson-Bryant—who have written about music, race, and Blackness and turn that gaze to Prince and his impact. Each paper was part of the American Studies Association special panel on Prince titled “Prince in Revue.” Here, as we did there, we draw upon a personal and political relationship to Prince in an effort to understand his impact on music, identity, and community.

Editor’s Note by John David Zuern

Lyric Acknowledgments

Special Section: On Prince

Introduction: On Prince: A Labor of Love, Loss, and Freedom by Andreana Clay

Prince and the Erotics of Democracy by Greg Tate

Obituarizing Black Maleness, Obituarizing Prince by Steven W. Thrasher

Prince, Queerness, and the Both/And of “Or” by Scott Poulson-Bryant

Keywords: Light Skin-ded Free Black Sex, Girlfriend by Andreana Clay

Continue reading

Advertisements

Biography Vol. 40 No. 4 (Fall 2017)

Image shows flags of Mexico, South Africa, and India

Biography‘s 2017 International Year in Review features life writing updates from México, South Africa, India, and more countries.

Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly volume 40, number 4 (Fall 2017) includes the journal’s second installment of the International Year in Review.

According to the editors, “The International Year in Review is a collection of short, site-specific essays by scholars from around the world on the year’s most influential publications in life writing in the countries, regions, and languages in which they specialize. This year’s International Year in Review includes entries from Australia, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Canada, China, Colombia, Curaçao, Finland, France, Iceland, India, Italy, Korea, México, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, South Africa, Spain, and the UK, along with two essays from the US, one on biography and one on memoir.”

The fourth issue in this quarterly volume also includes the Annual Bibliography of Works About Life Writing in 2016-2017, compiled by Sam Ikehara and Aiko Yamashiro.

Read more about the process of collecting this issue’s materials in the Editors’ Note.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


Sign up to receive e-mail alerts about Biography new issues from Project MUSE


BIO40-4C1croppedAbout the Journal

For over thirty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life-writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.

Call for Nominations: 2018 Biography Prize

The editors of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa have announced their call for nominations for the 2018 Biography Prize, which is awarded to an UH Mānoa graduate student who demonstrates excellency in life writing.

The Biography Prize winner receives a monetary award and is invited to give a presentation in the Brown Bag Biography lecture series.

NOMINATION DEADLINE

Nominations–which should include the student’s name, contact information, and project title–are due to biograph@hawaii.edu by Monday, April 16.

Once nominations are received, the Center for Biographical Research will notify the student to arrange for submission of the project. Candidates may also nominate their own work for the award.

Some candidates will be working on their manuscripts well into April, and this will not be a problem so long as they are able to submit their work by the April 16 deadline.

CRITERIA FOR NOMINATION

  1. The candidate should be a PhD or MA student in any graduate department of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (or have graduated with an MA or PhD in December 2017).

  2. The submission can be work that is written for a class, that is a section of a thesis or dissertation, or that is the completed thesis or dissertation. If written for a class, it should be work completed between May 2017 and May 2018 (and not previously submitted for a Biography Prize).

The project should focus on or intersect with any aspect of life writing theory, history, or practice in any medium and discipline

The project should be at least 3,000 to 10,000 words in length: longer projects can be submitted in their entirety, with a particular chapter or section highlighted for consideration. The work should demonstrate knowledge or awareness of central debates and theorizing in the field and study of life writing.

See flyer below or visit CBR’s Facebook page for more details.

Biography Prize 2018 Announcement


Read Biography archives at Project MUSE


Sign up to receive e-mail alerts about Biography new issues from Project MUSE

 

Spring 2018 Biography Brown Bag Series

The editors of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly and directors of the Center for Biographical Research at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa have released their Spring 2018 schedule of Biography Brown Bags.

If you’re in Hawai’i, mark your calendars and BYOL (bring your own lunch) to these exciting discussions about life writing. Unless otherwise noted, the following brown bags are held from noon to 1:15 p.m. Thursdays in Kuykendall Room 409-A at UH Mānoa. Click here for visitor parking information.

February 1: “Themes in the Narratives by Escapees from the Holocaust in WWII Italy.”
Luciano Minerbi, Dept. of Urban and Regional Planning, UH-Mānoa

February 8: “Constructing Post-Soviet Stardom: Auteur and the state in the case of Renata Litvinova.” Olga Mukhortova, Languages and Literatures of Europe and the Americas, UH Mānoa

February 15: “Writing With Not About: Constellating Stories in Auto-ethnography.”
John Gagnon, Dept. of English, UH-Mānoa

February 22: “Masters of the Currents: Theater, Community, and Social Change.”
Leilani Chan and Ova Saopeng, TeAda Productions

March 1*: “Island Soldiers: Living with Militarization in Micronesia.” Pacific Island Student Panel co-organized by the Marianas Club, for Mes Chamoru and Nuclear Remembrance Day. Moderated by Craig Santos Perez.
*This session will be held in Kuykendall Room 410

March 8: “Hulahula and Learn Something: Expressing Culture and Science.” Kiana Frank, Pacific Biosciences Research Center, UH-Mānoa

March 15: “Selling It Like It Is: The Value of Narrative in Business and Policy.” Amanda Rothschild, Dept. of Urban and Regional Planning, UH-Mānoa

March 22: “An Introduction to the Jon Van Dyke Archive at the UHM Law Library.” Ellen-Rae Cachola, William S. Richardson School of Law, UH-Mānoa

April 5: “Losing Don Belton: Meditations on Friendship, Murder, and Race, and the Ethics of Life Writing.” Mara Miller, Visiting Scholar with the Center for Biographical Research and Dept. of English, UH-Mānoa

April 12: “Al Harrington: Reflections on Genealogy, Acting, and a Polynesian Revue.” Al Harrington, Educator, Actor, and Entertainer

April 19: “Filling the Void: Creating Playing Space for Today’s Pacific Islander.”
Kiki Rivera, Dept. of Theatre and Dance, UH-Mānoa

Apr 26*: “Exploring the Vā in the Oral Sharing of Poetry.” Grace Teuila Taylor, Visiting Writer in Residence, Dept. of English, UH-Mānoa
*This session will be held in Kuykendall Room 410

See flyer below or visit CBR’s Facebook page for more details.

Spring 2018 Biography Brown Bag Flyer


Read Biography archives at Project MUSE


Sign up to receive e-mail alerts about Biography new issues from Project MUSE

 

Biography wins 2017 Best Special Issue Award

Cover of Biography volume 39, number 3

Image courtesy of the Center for Biographical Research at UH Mānoa

Please join us in congratulating the editors and contributors of Biography vol. 39, no. 3 on winning the Council of Editors of Learned Journal’s 2017 Best Special Issue Award!

The Council of Editors of Learned Journals (CELJ), an Allied Organization of the Modern Language Association, is the major national organization representing more than 450 editors of scholarly journals in all disciplines.

Biography vol. 39, no. 3 is the journal’s special issue on “Indigenous Conversations about Biography,” and it was guest edited by Alice Te Punga Somerville, Daniel Heath Justice, and Noelani Arista.

As detailed in the editors’ Introduction, the special issue started here in Mānoa Valley:

This is a conversation about Indigenous lives, the ways we understand them, the ways we represent them, and the responsibilities that come from doing this work in a good way. And this is just a beginning. We are honored to welcome you to this special issue of Biography, and to the Indigenous scholars, artists, and visionaries who come together in community on the topic of Indigenous biography. Some of this diverse group of Indigenous thinkers came together in person in Mānoa Valley on the Hawaiian island of O‘ahu, traveling from the Indigenous territories claimed by New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and the United States to take up the challenges, questions, concerns, and possibilities of representing Indigenous lives.

The complete table of contents and contributors for this issue may be viewed online at Project MUSE.

Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly is published by University of Hawai`i Press for the Center for Biographical Research (CBR) at UH Mānoa. The journal is coedited by Cynthia G. Franklin, Craig Howes, and John David Zuern. Managing editors for vol. 39 were Stanley Schab (emeritus) and Anjoli Roy. Read about CBR’s staff here.

Each year, Biography publishes a special issue that explores a topic of emerging critical interest, often centered around a CBR seminar. This year marks the second time Biography has won the CELJ Award for Best Special Issue, as coeditor Craig Howes explains:
Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has actually received this award once before, for our “Posthuman Lives” issue. That was the first one resulting from our invited seminar in Honolulu process. Alice, Daniel, and Noelani made a number of innovations, including commissioning the two responses to each longer contribution, which created an articulate and powerful community of voices. Their decisions have also strongly influenced how we have conducted the three seminars (!) we have held since then–in Honolulu, and in London.

Contact us to order a single copy, subscribe online, or read the full-text of this issue at Project MUSE (institutional or individual electronic subscription required).

To receive email alerts for when new issues of Biography publish online, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu.

Biography Vol. 40 No. 3 (Summer 2017)

A 1934 advertisement for The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas

A 1934 advertisement for The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. The Saturday Review of Literature, 13 Jan. 1934. From “On the Lecture Circuit with Gertrude Stein’s Portraits” by Linda Zygutis, in this issue.

Biography volume 40, number 3 (Summer 2017) includes the following announcement from co-editor John David Zuern:

For many years Biography‘s occasional feature “Sketches from Life” has made room for more personal essays by life writing scholars reflecting on practical, theoretical, and ethical issues related to their particular projects. We are rechristening this feature “First Person” to underscore the notion that scholars are the “first persons” in their academic writing and that scholarly projects are always, in one way or another, chapters in their authors’ life stories. In most cases, the autobiographical aspects of research are necessarily submerged in the final product, more or less invisible to the reader apart from sporadic appearances of the author’s directorial “I,” but sometimes the story of how an article or book came into being is as exciting and enlightening as the ideas the text has to offer. It is with this conviction that we are renewing our call for first-person memoirs of critical practice. Interested authors should query us about their plans before submitting manuscripts. (from Editor’s Note, vol. 40, no. 3)

Complete submission guidelines are available here.

In this Issue

Plus book reviews and contributors.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


Biography 40-3 C1About the Journal

For over thirty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life-writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.

#LookItUP: Minority Voices in UHP Journals

 

upweekiconThis is Part 4 in a series of University of Hawai`i Press blog posts celebrating University Press Week and highlighting scholarship published by UH Press journals in the past year. Read our introductory blog post here. Our hope is that this series will shed new light on how UH Press “sells the facts,” so to speak, and the value our 24 journals bring to our very existence. Links to each journal and article are provided below.*


Minority Voices

U.S. -Japan Women’s JournalNumber 51, 2017usjwj
Article:
 “Building a Feminist Scholarly Community: Fifty-One Issues of U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal” by Jan Bardsley

Context: Like many of our scholarly journals, U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal is a community of minority voices in and of itself. This volume celebrates 50 issues of bringing women’s studies and scholars together across international boundaries.

 

 

aza

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and CultureVolume 10, 2017
Special Section: Writer in Focus: Kim Sagwa

Context: Azalea presents five pieces by Korean author Kim Sagwa, who was able to complete her first novel under the United States an Alien of Extraordinary Ability in the Arts visa in 2016. One must wonder, given the tide change in immigrant policies and arts funding under the current administration, if such visas will be available for international artists in the future.

 

bio

Biography: An Interdisciplinary QuarterlyVolume 39, Number 4, Fall 2016
Special Section: International Year in Review

Context: Biography launched a new annual section that provides reports on life writing from across the world. This new venue gives us a lens by which to see global shifts in personal identity, from authors writing out of the U.K.’s Brexit to memoirists lyrically documenting the U.S.’s transgender community to historical biographers nostalgic for pre-1949 Republican China.

 

Trans-Humanities JournalVolume 10, Number 1, 2017th
Article: “Mapping the Terrain of New Black Fatherhood in Contemporary African American Literature” by Set-Byul Moon

Context: Literature can bridge the great divide between knowing and understanding, and this article looks at how the African American father has been developed against negative stereotypes through the writings of “Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, and Toni Morrison to contemporary — and relatively young — authors such as Leonard Pitts Jr. and Bernice L. McFadden.”

 

Asian Theatre JournalVolume 34, Number 1, Spring 2017atj
Special Section: Founders in the Field

Context: Asian Theatre Journal‘s Spring 2017 issue highlights three founders in the field–all women: Rachel Cooper, Kathy Foley, and Carol Fisher Sorgenfrei. Editor Kathy Foley also makes this charge to reviewers: “To become a truly international journal, cross-border research that does not always detour to Western thinking is much needed. It is limiting when authors feel they have to routinely apply Western tropes of gender, class, or aesthetics.”

 

Oregon beautiful picture

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics SocietyVolume 10, 2017
Section: Submission Guidelines

Context: This journal stands out for not only making new research in the field of Southeast Asian linguistics available for free via open-access publishing, but for its commitment to the peer review process, which ensures the publication of accurate information. From its submission guidelines: “Each original article undergoes double-blind review by at least two scholars, usually a member of the [JSEALS] Advisory Board and one or more independent referees.”

 

cri

China Review International: A Journal of Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese StudiesVolume 22, Number 1, 2015
Article:
“Review of Ka-ming Wu’s Reinventing Chinese Tradition: The Cultural Politics of Late Socialism (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2015)” by Nyíri Pál

Context: New scholarship benefits from criticism, and in this issue of China Review International (published in 2017), reviewer Nyíri Pál offers a fresh analysis of Chinese folk traditions in light of economic developments and recent ethnographic studies of “culture workers.”

 

*Institutional access to online aggregators such as Project MUSE may be required for full-text reading. For access questions, please see the Project MUSE FAQ available here or contact your local library.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu. To receive table-of-contents email alerts for these publications, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.