Category Archives: Cross-Currents

Cross-Currents, vol. 6, no. 1 (2017)

From Cartographic Anxieties in Mongolia: The Bogd Khan’s Picture-Map Uranchimeg Tsultemin. Bhavacakra, the Buddhist Wheel of Life. Thangka painting, Central Tibet, late nineteenth century. Source: Theos Bernard-Eleanor Murray collection, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive.

 

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review volume 6, number 1 is now available and features the following articles.

Cartographic Anxieties

  • Introduction to “Cartographic Anxieties” by Franck Bille
  • Fishers and Territorial Anxieties in China and Vietnam: Narratives of the South China Sea Beyond the Frame of the Nation by Edyta Roszko
  • The Da Ming Hunyi: Repurposing a Ming Map in Sino-African Diplomancy by Alexander Akin
  • Cartographic Anxieties in Mongolia: The Bogd Khan’s Picture-Map by Uranchimeg Tsultemin
  • On China’s Cartographic Embrace: A View from Its Northern Rim by Franck Bille
  • A Spectacle of Maps: Cartographic Hopes and Anxieties in the Pamirs by Martin Saxer

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Say hello to UH Press at AAS Booth 600

If you’re attending the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference in Toronto March 16-19, 2017, be sure to visit the University of Hawai’i Press at booth 600!

UH Press will have Asian studies books from our latest catalogs on display, as well as copies of the following journals:

We’re also proud to debut three online-only journals at AAS 2017:

Stop by and say hello as you browse through our display copies and catalogs. You may also pick up an order form at our booth or place your orders online at www.uhpress.hawaii.edu.

We look forward to seeing you in cold, snowy Toronto!

Cross-Currents, vol. 5, no. 2 (2016)

From “Guozhuang Trading Houses and Tibetan Middlemen in Dartsedo, the ‘Shanghai of Tibet'” in this issue. Photograph of Chu-nyi Barpa achak khapa (Ch. Qiujia guozhuang) taken by Sun Mingjing, 1944.

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review volume 5, number 2 is now available and features the following articles.

Frontier Tibet: Trade and Boundaries of Authority in Kham

  • Introduction to “Frontier Tibet: Trade and Boundaries of Authority in Kham” by Stephane Gros
  • “To Control Tibet, First Pacify Kham”: Trade Routes and “Official Routes” (Guandao) in Easternmost Kham by Partrick Booz
  • Construction Work and Wages at the Dergé Printing House in the Eighteenth Century by Remi Chaix
  • Guozhuang Trading Houses and Tibetan Middlemen in Dartsedo, the “Shanghai of Tibet” by Yudru Tsomu
  • Victorianizing Guangxu: Arresting Flows, Minting Coins, and
    Exerting Authority in Early Twentieth-Century Kham by Scott Relyea
  • Tricks of the Trade: Debt and Imposed Sovereignty in Southernmost Kham in the Nineteenth to Twentieth Centuries by Stephane Gros
  • Memory Politics at Work in a Gyalrong Revolt in the Early Twentieth Century by Jinba Tenzin
  • Afterword: Why Kham? Why Borderlands? Coordinating New
    Research Programs for Asia by C. Patterson Giersch

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Cross-Currents, vol. 5, no. 1 (2016)

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Tiles from the proposed version of reformed mahjong mentioned in “The Game People Played” by Maggie Greene in this issue. From the right, tiles include government types, classes of citizens, countries, continents, oceans, and technology.

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review volume 5, number 1 is now available and features the following articles:

  • The Game People Played: Mahjong in Modern Chinese Society and Culture by Maggie Greene
  • The Afterlives of An Chunggŭn in Republican China: From Sinocentric Appropriation to a Rupture in Nationalism by Inhye Han
  • Against the Nihilism of Suffering and Death: Richard E.K. Kim and His Works by Jooyeon Rhee
  • Street Theater and Subject Formation in Wartime China: Toward a New Form of Public Art by Xiaobing Tang
  • Domesticating Hybridity: Straits Chinese Cultural Heritage Projects in Malaysia and Singapore by Karen M. Teoh
  • A Russian Radical and East Asia in the Early Twentieth Century: Sudzilovsky, China, and Japan by Vladimir Tikhonov (Pak Noja)
  • Imagining Urban Community: Contested Geographies and Parallax Urban Dreams on Cheju Island, South Korea by Tommy Tran

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Cross-Currents, vol. 4, no. 2 (2015)

Cross-Currents (4#2) is now available on Project Muse.

Governing Marriage Migrations: Perspectives from Mainland China and Taiwan

Introduction
Elena Barabantseva, Antonia Chao, and Biao Xiang, 405

Cross-border migration for the purpose of marriage is on the rise, and at present it constitutes one of the most common forms of long-term international mobility in East Asia. This special issue of Cross-Currents analyzes marriage migration in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and Taiwan as a subject of governance. The articles included here demonstrate that marriage migration has attracted considerable policy attention and public anxiety not because it is about “marriage” or “migration” per se, but because it is perceived to be inseparable from a wide range of other issues, such as sexual morality, family norms, national identity, and border security. In particular, the long-lasting social relationships marriage migration creates and the role of marriage migrants (the vast majority of whom are women) in rearing the next generation of the state’s sovereign subjects tie marriage migration to state security concerns. Popular anxieties about marriage migration are often based on projections into the future rather than observations about the present reality. On one hand, the fact that marriage migration is deeply embedded in myriad social institutions and relations that cannot be dealt with in isolation causes a projection-based mode of governance; on the other hand, it renders transnational marriage particularly hard to govern, which further exacerbates anxiety. But this should not be seen as a failure in public policy. The articles in this special issue argue that such projections, imaginations, and self-perpetuating anxieties are important parts of how nationhood is constructed in the current era. As such, marriage migration as a subject of governance provides us with a special angle to examine how politics works in subtle and sometimes invisible ways on local, national, and transnational levels.

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Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review, vol. 4, no. 1 (2015)

(De)Memorializing the Korean War: A Critical Intervention

Editor’s Introduction
Guest Editor Suzy Kim (Rutgers University), 1
The purpose of this special issue is twofold: first, to engage in a critical intervention into the memorialization of the Korean War among the chief participants—the two Koreas, the United States, and China—to disrupt monolithic understandings of its origins, consequences, and experiences; and second, to do so as a necessary step toward reconciliation by placing divergent public memorials in conversation with one another.

ARTICLES

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Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review, vol. 3, no. 2 (2014)

ARTICLES

Stories and Histories from the China-Vietnam Border

Editor’s Introduction
Guest Hue-Tam Ho Tai (Harvard University), 315

In keeping with the mission of Cross-Currents, I have selected four articles for this issue whose common trait is their focus on the border between China and Vietnam. I am deliberately eschewing the term “borderland” to describe the area they cover, as one article, by Robert J. Antony, concerns life on the water and piracy. The other articles, however, fit neatly into the category of borderland studies.
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