Category Archives: Journal of Daoist Studies

#LookItUP: U.S. Policy, Economics, and International Relations in UHP Journals

 

upweekiconThis is Part 2 in a series of University of Hawai`i Press blog posts celebrating University Press Week and highlighting scholarship published by UH Press journals in the past year. Read our introductory blog post here. Our hope is that this series will shed new light on how UH Press “sells the facts,” so to speak, and the value our 24 journals bring to our very existence. Links to each journal and article are provided below.*


U.S. Policy, Economics, and International Relations

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The Hawaiian Journal of HistoryVolume 50, 2016
Article: “Jeeps, Communists, and Quonset Huts: World War II Surplus Disposal in the Territory of Hawai‘i” by Gwen Sinclair

Context: The effects of militarization and colonialism in Hawai’i are brought into focus with a historical analysis of how the U.S. government took ownership of and dispersal of supplies after World War II. The market produced by these historic events continues to affect the current Hawai’i-U.S. mainland political climate, and are exasperated by comments from the 45th president about “boycotting” Hawai’i.

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Journal of World HistoryVolume 28, Number 1, March 2017
Article: “Cotton and the Global Origins of Capitalism” by Sven Beckert

Context: While politicians on both sides of the U.S. election toted arguments of a lost domestic economy to industries overseas, the history of capitalism in the U.S. has always stretched beyond the nation’s borders. From his World History Association keynote address, Sven Beckert sets the tone for this issue’s special forum, which also makes a call for better understandings: “Commodity-focused histories are one powerful way to move toward a history beyond the nation-state, partly because they give empirical specificity to far-flung connections, partly because they allow us to bring the lessons of social history into global history, partly because they provide audiences for global history, and partly because, if done right, they can help us better understand some of the largest questions of world history.”

jj_2016_cover6HRReview of Japanese Culture and SocietyVolume 28, 2016
Special Section: Postwar Recovery, Affluence, and Its Critique

Context: What does reconstruction look like in a nation that lost a war and suffered two nuclear attacks? The Review of Japanese Culture and Society compiled a section of articles from Japanese photographers, architects, advertisers, and designers to share perspectives on the past and present postwar landscape.

 

untitledKorean Studies: A Multidisciplinary Journal on Korea and Koreans AbroadVolume 41, 2017
Article: “Informal Empire: The Origins of the U.S.–ROK Alliance and the 1953 Mutual Defense Treaty Negotiations” by Victor D. Cha

Context: In a search for validity, scholar Victor D. Cha unpacks a rare archival account of the 1953 mutual defense treaty negotiations that led to the creation of the U.S.-Republic of Korea (ROK) alliance.

 

jdsJournal of Daoist Studies, Volume 10, 2017
Article: “The American Transformation of Daoist Cultivation” by Livia Kohn

Context: Livia Kohn studies the Chinese influence on American healthcare, including cognitive therapy and stress relief: “Since 1965, when the Immigration Act was changed to allow Asians to immigrate to the United States, Chinese healing and longevity methods have become increasingly popular in America.”

*Institutional access to online aggregators such as Project MUSE may be required for full-text reading. For access questions, please see the Project MUSE FAQ available here or contact your local library.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu. To receive table-of-contents email alerts for these publications, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.

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Journal of Daoist Studies

jdsThe Journal of Daoist Studies is now available on Project MUSE and is also available for individual online subscriptions from the University of Hawaii Press. To subscribe online, visit: uhpress.hawaii.edu/t3-journal-of-daoist-studies

READ FOR FREE Volume 8 (2015)

The Creation of Daoism by Paul Fischer

This paper examines the creation of Daoism in its earliest, pre-Eastern Han period. After an examination of the critical terms “scholar/master” (zi 子) and “author/school” (jia 家), I argue that, given the paucity of evidence, Sima Tan and Liu Xin should be credited with creating this tradition. The body of this article considers the definitions of Daoism given by these two scholars and all of the extant texts that Liu Xin classified as “Daoist.” Based on these texts, I then suggest an amended definition of Daoism. In the conclusion, I address the recent claim that the daojia 道家/daojiao 道教 dichotomy is false, speculating that disagreement over this claim arises from context in which Daoism is considered: among the other pre-Qin “schools of thought” or among other world religions.

Ge Hong’s Xian: Private Hermits and Public Alchemists by Thomas Michael

This article addresses the position of Ge Hong (283-343) in early medieval Daoism by provoking a reconsideration of earlier forms of Chinese religion. The article argues that Ge Hong’s greatest innovation was his bringing together two separate traditions of early Chinese religion, namely that of the xian (often translated as “immortal”) that I identify with early Daoism, and that of alchemy that somehow was related to the fangshi movement. The article examines the historical trajectory of these two traditions as Ge Hong received them by exploring two of his major works, the Baopuzi neipian and the Shenxian zhuan, and examines the ways in which he relates these two early traditions to each other. He does this by portraying and describing two kinds of xian, which I call “private” and “public.” The article shows that Ge Hong’s accomplishment had a deep and lasting impact of the future traditions of medieval Daoism.

Changing Views on Sexuality in Early and Medieval China Ping Yao

The discourse on sexuality underwent tremendous transformations in early and medieval China. While early imagery and terminology of sexual intercourse reflect a naturalistic attitude toward sexuality, writings from the Han dynasty and the division periods largely reflected the Daoist perception of body, gender, and sex. Such domination gradually gave way to a diverse discourse on sexuality in the Tang, largely due to Buddhist influence and the rise of the examination culture. Tang discourse on sexuality, with its emphasis on sensuality, pleasure, and spiritual bliss, shaped ideals of femininity, masculinity, and intercourse.

Daoist Wisdom for Teachers A Diary Study by David McLachlan Jeffrey

Daoist wisdom as presented in the Daode jing is the philosophy of living in harmony with Dao, considered as the way everything exists. It is one of the three main Chinese worldviews, alongside Confucianism and Buddhism. Its mystical and individualistic essence emphasizes a realization of virtue (de) through an appreciation of paradox and nonaction (wuwei) as well as choosing simplicity and spontaneity or naturalness (ziran) in place of complexity and impulsiveness through adherence to the three core values of compassion, moderation, and humility. Through the Daoist prism, everything coexists mutually and is interdependent because of the interaction of two interdependent elements known as yin and yang. These are not polar opposites but two sides of the same coin. Daoism regards all elements as being complementary in that each defines itself in relation to the other. With this come paradoxical notions of the seemingly weak overcoming the strong in the sense that flimsy bamboo yields to storms and survive while mighty oaks fall, and wind and water patiently flow around rocks while turning them into sand over time.

Please see the complete contents of Volume 8, 2015 -Freely Available online

Most recent issue (Volume 10, 2017) is available to subscribers online.

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Say hello to UH Press at AAS Booth 600

If you’re attending the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference in Toronto March 16-19, 2017, be sure to visit the University of Hawai’i Press at booth 600!

UH Press will have Asian studies books from our latest catalogs on display, as well as copies of the following journals:

We’re also proud to debut three online-only journals at AAS 2017:

Stop by and say hello as you browse through our display copies and catalogs. You may also pick up an order form at our booth or place your orders online at www.uhpress.hawaii.edu.

We look forward to seeing you in cold, snowy Toronto!

Journal of Daoist Studies, Volume 10 (2017)

The University of Hawai’i Press is pleased to announce the availability of Volume 10, 2017 of the Journal of Daoist Studies.

The Journal of Daoist Studies (JDS) is an annual publication dedicated to the scholarly exploration of Daoism in all its different dimensions. Each issue has three main parts: Academic Articles on history, philosophy, art, society, and more (limit 8,500 words); Forum on Contemporary Practice on issues of current activities both in China and other parts of the world (limit 5,000 words); and News of the Field, presenting publications, dissertations, conferences and websites.

Subscribers receive access to the complete back content of the journal.

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Table-of-Contents Volume 10, 2017

Articles
Zhuangzi and Wittgenstein on the Self by Yumin Ao and Ulrich Steinvorth

Xu Mi’s Network: A Different Perspective on Early Higher Clarity Daoism by Thomas E. Smith

The Formation of a Daoist Pictorial Iconography in the Tang by Patricia Eichenbaum Karetzky

Daoist Seals, Part One: Activation and Fashioning by Shih-Shan Susan Huang

Daoist Ritual Manuals in Vietnam: Activating Stars and Trigrams by Ekaterina Zavidovskaia

Forum on Contemporary Practice
Daoist Literary Criticism by John Leonard

Daoist Visions of the Dream State by Esmaeil Radpour 

Ways to Immortality: In Popular and Daoist Tales by Wang Xiaoyang and Bao Yan

Physics, Physicality, and Physiology: The Foundation of Daoist Self-Cultivation by Steve Jackowicz

Daoism and Peace Psychology by Ron Catabia

The American Transformation of Daoist Cultivation by Livia Kohn

The Caishan Goddess Temple: Then and Now by Wei Yanli

News of the Field
Obituaries: Tan Dajiang 谭大江

Publications 

Conferences

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