Category Archives: Journal of Korean Religions

Journal of Korean Religions, vol. 7, no. 2 (2016)

Journal of Korean Religions vol. 7, no. 1 , Urban Aspirations in Seoul, features the following articles by scholars:

Special Issue: Urban Aspirations in Seoul

Jin-Heon Jung and Peter van der Veer, Guest Editors

This special issue invites readers to examine dynamic religious aspirations in the urban contexts of South Korea. Focusing on religious practices, adaptations, and material constructions in the making of Seoul, these articles contribute to the growing scholarly discussion on the relationship between the urban and the religious/sacred in the context of Asian cities and beyond (e.g., van der Veer 2015, Goh and van der Veer 2016). This special issue is the culmination of an interdisciplinary research team—the Seoul Lab—which contributed to the larger comparative urban research project of the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity undertaken in Mumbai, Shanghai, and Singapore.

Special issue articles include:

  • Engaged Buddhism for the Curative Self among Young Jungto Buddhist Practitioners in South Korea
    by Hyun Mee Kim and Si Hyun Choi
  • Ummah in Seoul: The Creation of Symbolic Spaces in the Islamic Central Masjid of Seoul
    by Doyoung Song
  • The Politics of Officially Recognizing Religions and the Expansion of Urban ‘‘Social Work’’ in Colonial Korea
    by Michael Kim
  • Punching Korean Protestantism: Challenging from within through a Televised Theological Roundtable
    by Seung Min Hong
  • The Religious-Political Aspirations of North Korean Migrants and Protestant Churches in Seoul
    by Jin-Heon Jung

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Journal of Korean Religions, vol. 7, no. 1 (2016)

Journal of Korean Religions vol. 7, no. 1 features the following articles by scholars:

Research Articles

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Journal of Korean Religions, vol. 6, no. 2 (2015)

Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE

New Horizons in Confucian Studies

Internalizing Morals and the Active Intervention of a Moral System: Zhu Xi and Yi Hwang’s Theories of kyŏngmul 格物 and mulgyŏk 物格
Kim Hyoungchan, 5

A Religious Approach to the Zhongyong: With a Focus on Western Translators and Korean Confucians
Seonhee Kim and MinJeong Baek, 27

The Korean War and Christianity

“All Man, All Priest”: Father Emil Kapaun, Religion, Masculinity, and the Korean War
Franklin Rausch, 61

Reframing Christianity on Cheju during the Korean War
Gwisook Gwon, 93

Book Reviews

A Postcolonial Self: Korean Immigrant Theology and Church
by Choi Hee An
reviewed by Andrew S. Park, 121

Memory and Honor: Cultural and Generational Ministry with Korean American Communities by Simon C. Kim
reviewed by Franklin Rausch, 124

Journal of Korean Religions, vol. 6, no. 1 (2015): Pure Land Buddhism in Korea

Guest Editor’s Introduction
Richard D. McBride II, 5

The six articles in this special issue explore aspects of the history of Pure Land Buddhism in Korea. Two essays deal with the Three Kingdoms and Silla periods, two papers treat topics in the Koryŏ period, and the final two articles break new ground in the Chosŏn period. Several articles reveal a close relationship between Pure Land practices and the Hwaŏm tradition, which was the dominant doctrinal school during the middle and late periods of Silla (ca. 668–935) and was the most influential intellectual tradition at court in the Koryŏ period (918–1392).

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Journal of Korean Religions, vol. 5, no. 2 (2014): Religion, Ritual, and the State in Chosŏn Korea

Guest Editor’s Introduction
Don Baker, 5

The five articles in this special issue explore the relationship of the Confucian government of the Chosŏn dynasty with religion and ritual. They reveal how much more that government was concerned with the ritual behavior of its subjects than have been the modern governments of the Republic of Korea. These articles also show that, unless we consider how important ritual behavior was to pre-modern government officials, we will misunderstand or overlook some important developments in the history of the Chosŏn dynasty.
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Journal of Korean Religions, vol. 4, no. 2 (2013): North Korea and Religion

Editor’s Introduction
Guest Editor Carl Young, 5

The topic of this special issue is “North Korea and Religion.” At first glance, religion and North Korea are two subjects that may not appear to be closely associated. North Korea is a communist country and Marxist Communism has traditionally been very negative towards religion. Although North Korean communism has often strayed far from its Marxist roots, in relation to religion, the North Korean regime has actually gone beyond many communist regimes in its repression and control of religious organizations. As shown by several articles in this special issue, the policy of the North Korean state towards religion has gone through several phases and its relations towards religious organizations have been complex, ambivalent, and unpredictable, in many ways in line with much of the regime’s behavior on other issues. …
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Journal of Korean Religions, vol. 4, no. 1 (2013): Interpreting Christian Missionary Experiences in Korea

Editor’s Introduction
Guest Editor Timothy S. Lee, 5

Every generation interprets and reinterprets its past—or should. This maxim rings true with respect to Christian missionary experiences in Korea. Ever since 1875, when Charles Dallet’s (Catholic) Histoire de l’Église de Corée was published, or 1929, when L. George Paik’s The History of Protestant Missions
in Korea, 1832–1910
was published, scholars have been interpreting and reinterpreting Christian missionary experiences in Korea. This interpretive legacy is being honored in this issue of the Journal of Korean Religions. In it are seven articles contributed by some of the most active English-language scholars of Korean Christianity working today. As a contributor and organizer of a symposium that gave rise to these articles, I am grateful to JKR for publishing them—and in doing so advancing the conversation on the history of Christian missions in Korea, in particular, and the history of Korean Christianity, in general…
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