Category Archives: Journal of World History

Journal of World History, vol. 27, no. 4 (2016)

The December issue of  Journal of World History volume 27 number 4 features the following articles by world history scholars:

  • S.A.M. Adshead on China, World Institutions, and World History
    by Brian Moloughney
  • From Siam to Greenland: Danish Economic Imperialism at the Turn of the Twentieth Century
    by Janina Priebe
  • The New Asia of Rash Behari Bose: India, Japan, and the Limits of the International, 1912–1945
    by Joseph McQuade
  • Surveying Africa in World History: A View from the South (Part 2)
    by Leslie Witz
  • Book Reviews

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CFP: Journal of World History Special Issue on Gender and Empire

JWH26_1_cvr_imgSpecial Issue

Gender and Empire: Intimacies, Bodies, Detritus

The Journal of World History seeks submissions on the topic of Gender and Empire. For more than three decades scholars have incorporated gender studies
into traditional imperial histories to draw attention to the myriad ways in which imperial projects co-created modern gender identities. Emerging from scholarship on the major European empires of the 19th and 20th centuries (British, French, German, and Dutch), studies of gender and empire now include the United States, Russia, and Japan. Similarly, scholarship on colonized areas around the globe now includes Latin America, both postcolonial and  neo-colonial, in addition to Africa and Asia. The range of research topics has also expanded considerably from literal intersections between gender and empire, as seen in policing prostitution and anti-miscegenation laws, to other less literal but no less body-saturated nanny/child relations; transnational foodways; and automobility to name a few. Regardless of foci, these approaches  investigate formations of embodied race and gender identities as central to the  ideology of imperialism as well as to the daily functioning of colonialism on the ground, with special attention to how the latter undercut the former. Continue reading

Journal of World History, vol. 27, no. 3 (2016)

From the Stefan Hübner article, “Images of the Sporting “Civilizing Mission”: The Far Eastern Championship Games (1913–1934) and Visions of Modernization in English-Language Philippine Newspapers” in this issue. Le Petit Journal’s cartoon “En Chine” was published on 16 January 1898 shortly after China accepted Germany’s lease of Jiaozhou Bay.

The March  Journal of World History volume 27 number 3 special issue “Preaching the Civilizing Mission and Modern Cultural Encounters” features the following articles by world history scholars:

  • Sartorial Settlement: The Mission Field and Transformation in Colonial Natal, 1850–1897
    by T.J. Tallie
  • Civilization and Russification in Tsarist Central Asia, 1860–1917
    by Ulrich Hofmeister
  • Singing the Civilizing Mission in the Land of Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms: The Fisk Jubilee Singers in Nineteenth-Century Germany
    by Kira Thurman
  • From Transformation to Negotiation: A Female Mission in a “City of Schools”
    by Julia Hauser
  • Images of the Sporting “Civilizing Mission”: The Far Eastern Championship Games (1913–1934) and Visions of Modernizing in English-Language Philippine Newspapers
    by Stefan Hübner
  • “Not Far from the Kingdom of God”: Shamanism and Colonial Control in Russia’s Eastern Borderlands, 1853–1917
    by Jesse D. Murray
  • Book Reviews

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Journal of World History, vol. 27, no. 2 (2016)

Double carpet- page with swimming fishes. Pentateuch. Sana’a (Yemen), 1469. London, British Library, Ms. Or. 2348, fols. 38v–39. © The British Library Board. Patterns of Artistic Hybridization in the Early Protoglobalization Period*

Double carpet-page with swimming fishes from Patterns of Artistic Hybridization in the Early Protoglobalization Period this issue. Pentateuch. Sana’a (Yemen), 1469.
© The British Library Board.

March’s  Journal of World History volume 27 number 2 features the following articles by world history scholars:

  • The Kingdom of Kongo and the Thirty Year’s War by John K. Thornton
  • Patterns of Artistic Hybridization in the Early Protoglobalization Period by Luís U. Afonso
  • The Global Origins of a “Paraguayan” Sweetener: Ka’a He’e and Stevia in the Twentieth Century, by Bridget María Chesterton and Timothy Yang
  • Reconsidering the Yokohama “Gold Rush” of 1859, by Simon James Bytheway and Martha Chaiklin
  • The Global Construction of International Lay in the Nineteenth Century: The Case of Arbitration, by Steven M. Harris
  • Book Reviews

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Journal of World History, vol. 27, no. 1 (2016)

March’s  Journal of World History volume 27 number 1 features the following articles by history scholars:

  • “Lord Cromer’s Shadow”: Political Anglo-Saxonism and the Egyptian Protectorate as a Model in the American Philippines, by Patrick M. Kirkwood
  • The Sundry Acquaintances of Dr. Albino Z. Sycip: Exploring the Shangai-Manila Connection, circa 1910-1940, by Phillip Guingona
  • “Real Problems to Discuss”: The Congress for Cultural Freedom’s Asian and African Expeditions, 1951-1959, by Roland Burke
  • The Ming Rejection of the Portuguese Embassy of 1517: A Reassessment, by James Fujitani
  • Book Reviews

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Journal of World History, vol. 26, no. 4 (2015)

Journal of World History volume 26 number 4 is a special issue edited by Gareth Curless, Stacey Hynd, Temilola Alanamu, and Katherine Roscoe. Titled “The British World as World History: Networks in Imperial and Global History,” this dedicated issue features imperial historians inspired by the “cultural turn” and the rise of global history. Instead of accounts that focus on a metropolitan center and a colonial periphery, scholars now advocate

a decentered approach to the study of empire, which emphasizes the importance of paying close attention to the multiple networks of capital, goods, information, and people that existed within and between empires. While these networked treatments of empire have added much to our understanding of imperialism, the articles in this special issue argue that historians must remain sensitive to the specifics of the imperial experience, the limits of imperialism’s global reach, and the way in which imperialism could lead to new forms of exclusion and inequality.

Articles in the special issue include:

  • The Establishment of the Tongwen Guan and the Fragile Sin-British Peace of the 1860s, by Melissa Mouat
  • “Home Allies”: Female Networks, Tensions, and Conflicted Loyalties in India and Van Diemen’s Land, 1826-1849, by Felicity Berry
  • Settler Historicism and Anticolonial Rebuttal in the British World, 1880-1920, by Andam Behm
  • The “Truth” about Kenya: Connection and Contestation in the 1956 Kamiti Controversy, by Katherine Bruce-Lockhart
  • “Tropical Allsorts”: The Transnational Flavor of British Development Policies in Africa, by Charlotte Lynia Riley
  • Functions and Failures of Transnational Activism: Discourses of Children’s Resistance and Repression in Global Anti-Apartheid Networks, by Emily Bridger
  • Book reviews

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Journal of World History, vol. 26, no. 3 (2015)

The Journal of World History volume 26 number 3 features the following works by world history scholars:

  • Female Rule in the Indian Ocean World (1300–1900), by Stefan Amirell
  • Scaling the Local: Canada’s Rideau Canal and Shifting World Heritage Norms, by Aurélie Elisa Gfeller and Jaci Eisenberg
  • How Shall We Live?: Chinese Communal Experiments after the Great War in Global Context, by Shakhar Rahav
  • Anthony Sherley’s Spanish Writings and the Global Early Modern, by Jesús López-Peláez Casellas
  • Cholera, Colonialism, and Pilgrimage: Exploring Global/Local Exchange in the Central Egyptian Delta, by Stephanie Anne Boyle
  • Locating Africans on the World Stage: A Problem in World History, by Patrick Manning
  • Book Reviews

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