Category Archives: Pacific Science

#LookItUP: Climate Change and Natural Disasters in UHP Journals

 

upweekiconThis is Part 6 in a series of University of Hawai`i Press blog posts celebrating University Press Week and highlighting scholarship published by UH Press journals in the past year. Read our introductory blog post here. Our hope is that this series will shed new light on how UH Press “sells the facts,” so to speak, and the value our 24 journals bring to our very existence. Links to each journal and article are provided below.*


Climate Change and Natural Disasters

Asian Perspectives: The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the PacificVolume 56, Number 2, 201700_AP_c1-4_blog
Article:
“The Search for Tsunami Evidence in the Geological and Archaeological Records, With a Focus on Japan” by Gina L. Barnes

Context: Archeologist Gina L. Barnes takes a look at tsunami sites through the lens of disaster preparedness: “tsunami damage seldom leads to collapse of a society or civilization, though the socio-economic status of the affected society is crucial to the nature of human response […] Disaster archaeology, including tsunami archaeology, is thus a timely and welcome approach to understanding the situation of the world today.”

 

Pacific Science: A Quarterly Devoted to the Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific RegionVolume 71, Number 4, October 2017Pacific Science 71:4 cover image
Article: “Estimating Cost-Effectiveness of Hawaiian Dry Forest Restoration Using Spatial Changes in Water Yield and Landscape Flammability under Climate Change” by Christopher A. Wada, Leah L. Bremer, Kimberly Burnett, Clay Trauernicht, Thomas Giambelluca, Lisa Mandle, Elliott Parsons, Charlotte Weil, Natalie Kurashima, and Tamara Ticktin

Context: This study joins dozens of Pacific Science research articles that show the effects of climate change, and it appears with seven open-access articles that focus on the challenges facing native forest restoration in Hawai’i and the Pacific region. (And while we’re “selling the facts,” we should mention Pacific Science also published a peer-reviewed biological fact in the past year: the discovery of a new species of Stylasterid in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands.)

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast GeographersVolume 79, 2017APCG Yearbook 79 cover
Article:
“Institutional Obstacles to Beaver Recolonization and Potential Climate Change Adaptation in Oregon, USA” by Jeff Baldwin

Context: As streams dry up due to climate change, beaver are being displaced from their natural habitats. This study critically examines five institutional blockages to beaver recolonization in Oregon through multiple interviews, policies, and publications.

 

The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island AffairsVolume 29, Number 2, 2017
Section: “Year in Review: International Issues and Events” by Nic Maclellan

00_29.2 cover 1Context: Nic Maclellan reflects on the U.S.’s political influence on the Pacific region, especially as it relates to environmental regulation: “Debates over climate action, West Papua, fisheries, and trade continued as a feature of regional affairs in 2016, often dividing Pacific governments and their international partners. The election of Donald Trump as U.S. president in November set the stage for these divisions to continue, given Trump’s statements during the election campaign on climate change and America’s new directions in foreign policy.” This introduction is followed by more reports from the field, including Fiji, Papua, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu. Also appearing in this issue: “Climate Change and the Imagining of Migration: Emerging Discourses on Kiribati’s Land Purchase in Fiji” by Elfriede Hermann and Wolfgang Kempf.

*Institutional access to online aggregators such as Project MUSE may be required for full-text reading. For access questions, please see the Project MUSE FAQ available here or contact your local library.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu. To receive table-of-contents email alerts for these publications, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.

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Interview: Pacific Science 71:4 special section editors

Published this October, Pacific Science volume 71, no. 4 arrived with a special section on habitat restoration, which includes seven open-access articles. We asked Editor-in-Chief Curtis C. Daehler and guest editors Melissa Price and Robert J. Toonen to weigh in on this issue’s special topic and other research important to the quarterly science journal. 

Image of He'eia National Estuarine Research Reserve

This scenic photo shows the He’eia National Estuarine Research Reserve, where some Pacific Science 71:4 contributors did their research. The reserve is managed in partnership by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the State of Hawai’i. (Photo by Manuel Meija of The Nature Conservancy.)

Vol. 71, Issue 4 includes a special feature: “Scaling Up Restoration Efforts in the Pacific Islands.” Why devote a whole section to this topic?

We have lost a lot of native species to habitat destruction in the Pacific region. Today, considerable attention is being given to protecting native ecosystems, for example, in the Hawai‘i Governor’s Sustainable Hawai‘i Initiative to protect 30% of the state’s watersheds by 2030. However, much less attention is given to restoration efforts, or the conversion of nonnative to native-dominated habitats. Invaded ecosystems may be more at risk for wildfires, and may enhance invasions of nearby native ecosystems. A few large-scale restoration success stories exist, such as that of Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, and there are a number of small-scale efforts across the Pacific led by nonprofit groups. In this issue, we hope to promote conversations about how we can scale up restoration efforts to improve resiliency, promote ecosystem services, and reduce extinction rates across the Pacific region.

Koolaus 2

Melissa Price, guest editor of Pacific Science vol. 71, no. 4, is an assistant professor in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, CTAHR, at UH Mānoa. She provided this picture from her field work.

What challenges did you face in the creation of this special section?

The biggest challenges were representing the range of work being done around the Pacific and asking those working at small scales to think about how their work might be scaled-up. Also, a number of projects were just getting started, and it may be decades before there are results from these efforts. Finally, truly transformative work will likely be transdisciplinary. People involved in restoration must partner across sectors to solve challenging problems associated with restoration, such as seed production, removal of invasive plants and animals, and access for equipment and people to remote locations. We still have a long way to go in these areas, but we hope that this special collection will spark productive conversations.

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Pacific Science, vol. 71, no. 4 (October 2017)

A visual interpretation for a spatial model of the social-ecological zones (wao kanaka, wao lā`au, wao nāhele, wao kele, wao akua) implemented during the aliʻi-era for the ahupuaʻa of Hāʻena, Haleleʻa, Kauaʻi. This model is being used by contemporary resource managers to inform large-scale biocultural conservation and forest restoration efforts within this social-ecological system (see Winter & Lucas, this issue for additional details; image credit: Ben Nyberg).

The October 2017 issue of Pacific Science begins with a Special Feature, which includes seven open-access articles available on Project MUSE and Bio-One.

Special Feature: Scaling Up Restoration Efforts in the Pacific Islands (Open-Access)

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Pacific Science, vol. 71, no. 3 (July 2017)

From Demography of Marine Turtles in the Nearshore Environments of the Northern Mariana Islands, an open access article in this issue. Clockwise from bottom left: nearshore capture locations in relation to benthic habitat of ( A) Saipan, (B) Tinian, and (C ) Rota, and (D) an image of the free diver hand capturing a juvenile green turtle. Green and orange dots depict capture locations for green and hawksbill turtles, respectively. Shading indicates benthic habitat.

 

This quarter’s issue of Pacific Science includes Demography of Marine Turtles in the Nearshore Environments of the Northern Mariana Islands, an open-access article; and an online-only supplemental for Methods for Measuring Bird-Mediated Seed Rain: Insights from a Hawaiian Mesic Forest.

The open-access article examines honu:

In the western Pacific, green (Chelonia mydas) and hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata) sea turtles are listed as Endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). Population data are limited for both species throughout the entire region and particularly in the Philippine Sea. This study characterizes size class distribution, growth rates, habitat use, behavior, diet, and site fidelity of foraging aggregations of green and hawksbill turtles in nearshore habitats of Saipan, Tinian, and Rota in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI ). Between August 2006 and February 2014, we captured 642 turtles (493 green and 36 hawksbill turtles). … This is the first study within the CNMI to report on morphometric data and diet composition of marine turtles. These results provide an assessment of green and hawksbill turtle population demographics and habitat use in the CNMI.

Scholarly articles in this issue:

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Pacific Science, vol. 71, no. 2 (2017)

Adult specimens of Eriocheir ogasawaraensis, endemic to the Ogasawara Islands, collected in March, 2004, in Chichi-jima, Ogasawara, Japan, in dorsal view: female, 82 mm in carapace width (upper), male, 81 mm in carapace width (lower). Kobayashi and Satake in this issue compare the morphology of this endemic crab to that of its ontinental congener, the Japanese mitten crab, Eriocheir japonica, finding differences in sexual dimorphism. Photo: Satoshi Kobayashi.

This quarterly issue of Pacific Science explores new research about Pacific crabs, fish, plankton, birds, grass, frogs, and eels.

The opening article examines fish in the aftermath of the 2011 Tohoku 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. From the abstract:

Thirteen commonly consumed types of fish caught in the North Pacific and locally available in Hawai‘i were analyzed using gamma spectroscopy to measure Fukushima-derived and historic 134Cs and 137Cs isotopes. All fish samples had detectable 137Cs above 95% confidence intervals. Three out of the thirteen samples had 134Cs, an isotope indicative of Fukushima releases, detected above 95% confidence intervals. The highest 134Cs and 137Cs concentration in the examined species was in ‘ahi tuna, carrying 0.10 ± 0.04 Bq/ kg and 0.62 ± 0.05 Bq/ kg, respectively. Other samples with 134Cs activities found above their 2-sigma uncertainty were albacore tuna and swordfish. Historic and Fukushima-derived contributions were evaluated, and in several samples the Fukushima-derived radiocesium dominated the total radiocesium inventory with up to 61% contribution. All activities were below derived intervention limits of 1,200 Bq/ kg, and the doses to humans from consuming the fish attributable to radiocesium were 0.02 – 0.2 μ Sv, in comparison to 6 – 20 μ Sv contributed by the natural 40K present in the same fish.

Scholarly articles in this issue:

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Pacific Science, vol. 71, no. 1 (2017)

From ‘Range Expansion of the Small Carpenter Bee Ceratina smaragdula across the Hawaiian Archipelago with Potential Ecological Implications for Native Pollinator Systems’ in this issue. Female (left) and male (right) Ceratina (Pithitis) smaragdula: face, a, b; dorsal view, c, d; lateral view, e, f. Body length is between 6 and 8 mm on average. Note relatively prominent facial maculation and black abdominal patches of the male.

Preview Pacific Science, vol. 71 no. 1 with the following article free for all from Bio-One:

New Species of Stylasterid (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa: Anthoathecata: Stylasteridae) from the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands by Stephen D. Cairns

Also inside this quarter’s issue, Wyatt A. Shell examines small green carpenter bee range expansion in Hawai’i:

Invasive bee species may have a widely detrimental impact on their novel host ecosystem. Introduced bees can rapidly disrupt native plantpollinator mutualisms through competition with indigenous pollinator fauna and facilitation of invasive flora reproduction. […] Here we present a comprehensive synthesis of C. smaragdula’s known biological and ecological history, as well as a population genetic analysis of C. smaragdula from Maui, and from locations across its native range, at the cytochrome oxidase I (COI ) locus. We update C. smaragdula’s known distribution and occurrence elevation in Hawai‘i and reveal a lack of genetic structure between Hawaiian and native range populations.

Scholarly articles in this issue:

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Pacific Science, vol. 70, no. 4 (2016)

From Identity and Distribution of Introduced Slugs ( Veronicellidae) in the Hawaiian and Samoan Islands in this issue. Photographs and drawings of three veronicellid species dissected to show structures used to distinguish them. 1: Veronicella cubensis (representative specimen from Hawai‘i); 2: Laevicaulis alte (representative specimen from Hawai‘i); 3: Sarasinula plebeia [no live specimen was available for dissection; this illustration is of the “plesiotype” of Thomé (1971) in the Muséum nationale d’Histoire naturelle, Paris, mnhn 21307]. Key reproductive structures that differ among the species: a, penis; b, digitiform gland papilla; c, digitiform tubules.

Pacific Science, vol. 70 no. 4 is now available and contains the following articles:

  • Spatial Scale, Genetic Structure, and Speciation of Hawaiian Endemic Yeasts by Marc-André Lachance, Julie D. Collens, Xiao Feng Peng, Alison M. Wardlaw, Lucie Bishop, Lily Y. Hou, and William T. Starmer
  • Alien Insects Dominate the Plant-Pollinator Network of a Hawaiian Coastal Ecosystem by Kimberly Shay, Donald R. Drake, Andrew D. Taylor, Heather F. Sahli, Melody Euaparadorn, Michelle Akamine, Jennifer Imamura, Doug Powless, and Patrick Aldrich
  • Avian Abundances on Yap, Federated States of Micronesia, after Typhoon Sudall by W. Douglas Robinson and Tara R. Robinson
  • Habitat Use and Status of the Bokikokiko or Christmas Island Warbler (Acrocephalus aequinoctialis) by Eric A. VanderWerf, Ray Pierce, Ratita Bebe, and Katareti Taabu
  • Temporal Variation in Macro-Moth Abundance and Species Richness in a Lowland Fijian Forest by Siteri Tikoca, Simon Hodge, Sarah Pene, John Clayton, Marika Tuiwawa, and Gilianne Brodie
  • Seasonal Growth Fluctuations of Four Species of Neritid Gastropods in an Upper Mangrove Estuary, Ishigaki Island, Japan by Yoshitake Takada
  • Identity and Distribution of Introduced Slugs (Veronicellidae) in the Hawaiian and Samoan Islands by Jaynee R. Kim, Kenneth A. Hayes, Norine W. Yeung, and Robert H. Cowie
  • Eleotris bosetoi ( Teleostei: Gobioidei: Eleotridae), a New Species of Freshwater Fish from the Solomon Islands by Marion I. Mennesson, Philippe Keith, Brendan C. Ebner, and Philippe Gerbeaux
  • First Record of Bryozoan Amathia (= Zoobotryon) verticillata (Bryozoa: Vesiculariidae) from Taiwan by Dan Minchin, Ta-Kang Liu, and Muhan Cheng

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