Category Archives: Review of Japanese Culture and Society

#LookItUP: U.S. Policy, Economics, and International Relations in UHP Journals

 

upweekiconThis is Part 2 in a series of University of Hawai`i Press blog posts celebrating University Press Week and highlighting scholarship published by UH Press journals in the past year. Read our introductory blog post here. Our hope is that this series will shed new light on how UH Press “sells the facts,” so to speak, and the value our 24 journals bring to our very existence. Links to each journal and article are provided below.*


U.S. Policy, Economics, and International Relations

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The Hawaiian Journal of HistoryVolume 50, 2016
Article: “Jeeps, Communists, and Quonset Huts: World War II Surplus Disposal in the Territory of Hawai‘i” by Gwen Sinclair

Context: The effects of militarization and colonialism in Hawai’i are brought into focus with a historical analysis of how the U.S. government took ownership of and dispersal of supplies after World War II. The market produced by these historic events continues to affect the current Hawai’i-U.S. mainland political climate, and are exasperated by comments from the 45th president about “boycotting” Hawai’i.

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Journal of World HistoryVolume 28, Number 1, March 2017
Article: “Cotton and the Global Origins of Capitalism” by Sven Beckert

Context: While politicians on both sides of the U.S. election toted arguments of a lost domestic economy to industries overseas, the history of capitalism in the U.S. has always stretched beyond the nation’s borders. From his World History Association keynote address, Sven Beckert sets the tone for this issue’s special forum, which also makes a call for better understandings: “Commodity-focused histories are one powerful way to move toward a history beyond the nation-state, partly because they give empirical specificity to far-flung connections, partly because they allow us to bring the lessons of social history into global history, partly because they provide audiences for global history, and partly because, if done right, they can help us better understand some of the largest questions of world history.”

jj_2016_cover6HRReview of Japanese Culture and SocietyVolume 28, 2016
Special Section: Postwar Recovery, Affluence, and Its Critique

Context: What does reconstruction look like in a nation that lost a war and suffered two nuclear attacks? The Review of Japanese Culture and Society compiled a section of articles from Japanese photographers, architects, advertisers, and designers to share perspectives on the past and present postwar landscape.

 

untitledKorean Studies: A Multidisciplinary Journal on Korea and Koreans AbroadVolume 41, 2017
Article: “Informal Empire: The Origins of the U.S.–ROK Alliance and the 1953 Mutual Defense Treaty Negotiations” by Victor D. Cha

Context: In a search for validity, scholar Victor D. Cha unpacks a rare archival account of the 1953 mutual defense treaty negotiations that led to the creation of the U.S.-Republic of Korea (ROK) alliance.

 

jdsJournal of Daoist Studies, Volume 10, 2017
Article: “The American Transformation of Daoist Cultivation” by Livia Kohn

Context: Livia Kohn studies the Chinese influence on American healthcare, including cognitive therapy and stress relief: “Since 1965, when the Immigration Act was changed to allow Asians to immigrate to the United States, Chinese healing and longevity methods have become increasingly popular in America.”

*Institutional access to online aggregators such as Project MUSE may be required for full-text reading. For access questions, please see the Project MUSE FAQ available here or contact your local library.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu. To receive table-of-contents email alerts for these publications, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.

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Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 28 (2016)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

From The City of the Future (1960) in this issue. Kikutake Kiyonori, Marine City, 1971. Drawing with felt-tip pen, 64 cm x 64 cm. Photo by Jean-Claude Planchet. Musee National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris France. © CNAC/MNAM/Dist.RMN-Grand Palais/Art Resource, NY. Courtesy of Kikutake Architects.

The Review of Japanese Culture and Society, volume 28 opens with an editors’ introduction:

…“Japanese design” possesses one of the most recognizable profiles, albeit one with multiple personalities. Notions of minimalism, Zen, wabi-sabi, and cute are often ascribed as inherent attributes of Japanese design. This profile operates  across media and disciplines, from graphic design to architecture and interiors, product and furniture design, and fashion and newer industries like interaction or experience design. On the one hand, we hear of “Zen minimalism” associated with architecture, interiors, and the simple lines and matte surfaces of sophisticated product design, and on the other hand, a sort of frenetic hyper-cute sensibility associated with youth culture and digital design.
Design and Society in Modern Japan: An Introduction, by Ignacio Adriasola, Sarah Teasley, and Jilly Traganou

DESIGN AND SOCIETY IN MODERN JAPAN

Japan’s Industrial Arts: Present and Future (1917) (translated by Penny Bailey)
by Yasuda Rokuzō

Industrial Arts and the Development of Japan’s Industry (1932) (translated by Penny Bailey)
by Kunii Kitarō Continue reading

Say hello to UH Press at AAS Booth 600

If you’re attending the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference in Toronto March 16-19, 2017, be sure to visit the University of Hawai’i Press at booth 600!

UH Press will have Asian studies books from our latest catalogs on display, as well as copies of the following journals:

We’re also proud to debut three online-only journals at AAS 2017:

Stop by and say hello as you browse through our display copies and catalogs. You may also pick up an order form at our booth or place your orders online at www.uhpress.hawaii.edu.

We look forward to seeing you in cold, snowy Toronto!

Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 27 (2015)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

SPECIAL JOURNAL ISSUE IN HONOR OF KYOKO SELDEN

The Review of Japanese Culture and Society, volume 27 is a special issue to honor the memory and contributions of Kyoko Selden.

Flute Boy, watercolor by Kyoko Selden.
From the family’s personal collection.

This special issue edited by Alisa Freedman includes many of Kyoko Selden’s finest translations, including some not previously published. They reveal the range and depth of Kyoko’s interests and knowledge. Her interpretations of modern literature, of writings about the atomic bomb, and of fiction and poetry by women writers, are well known—but her translations of the fourteenth-century Taiheiki: The Chronicle of Great Peace and the Tokugawa era Hinin Taiheiki: The Paupers’ Chronicle of Peace, published for the first time in this issue, reveal her sure grasp of the classical canon as well. The power of Kyoko’s translation work, her ability to bring a new text into being, and the subtle creativity of her expression, are hallmarks of her achievements.

1 In Remembrance of Kyoko Selden
Mizuta Noriko, 1

2 Remembering Kyoko Selden
Brett de Bary, 3

3 Introduction to the Special Issue in Honor of Kyoko Selden
Alisa Freedman, 6

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Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 26 (2014)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

COMMENSURABLE DISTINCTIONS: INTERCULTURAL NEGOTIATIONS OF MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE VISUAL CULTURE

1 Guest Editors’ Introduction
Bert Winther-Tamaki and Kenichi Yoshida, 1

ARTICLES

Intersectionality

2 Six Episodes of Convergence Between Indian, Japanese, and Mexican Art from the Late Nineteenth Century to the Present
Bert Winther-Tamaki, 13

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Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 25 (2013)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

Working Words: New Approaches to Japanese Studies

From the editors
Mizuta Noriko, Miya Elise Mizuta, Haga Kōichi, Natta Phisphumvidhi, v

ARTICLES

Working Words: New Approaches to Japanese Studies
Jordan Sand, Alan Tansman, Dennis Washburn, 1

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Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 24 (2012)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

Beyond Tenshin:
Okakura Kakuzo’s Multiple Legacies

Dedication
to Kyoko Iriye Selden (1936-2013)

Images

Acknowledgements
Noriko Murai, Yukio Lippit, xi

ARTICLES

1 Okakura Kakuzō: A Reintroduction
Noriko Murai, Yukio Lippit, 1

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