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Trans-Humanities Journal

cover trans humanitiesTrans-Humanities publishes materials that expand humanities research to include contemporary cultural and sociological phenomena and to open an academic and discursive space for trans-boundary and multi or trans-disciplinary approaches and communications, not just in the humanities but also the social sciences, the natural sciences, and the arts.

Read for free all three issues of volume 8, 2015 – on Project MUSE

Articles in volume 8 include:

Living in Difficult Times: New Materialist Subject/ivity and Be coming of Posthuman Life by Jajati K. Pradhan and Seema Singh (8#1)

Revising the Human in Samuel Beckett’s Aesthetic Education by
Kelly S. Walsh (8#1)

Special Topic: Fields of Modern Knowledge and Journalism (8#3)

Blade Runner and the Right to Life by Eli Park Sorensen

When Private Life Became Political: German Politicians, Sex Scandals, and Mass Media, 1880–1914  by Frank Bösch

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Subscribe online at: www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/t-trans-humanities

 

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Journal of Daoist Studies

jdsThe Journal of Daoist Studies is now available on Project MUSE and is also available for individual online subscriptions from the University of Hawaii Press. To subscribe online, visit: uhpress.hawaii.edu/t3-journal-of-daoist-studies

READ FOR FREE Volume 8 (2015)

The Creation of Daoism by Paul Fischer

This paper examines the creation of Daoism in its earliest, pre-Eastern Han period. After an examination of the critical terms “scholar/master” (zi 子) and “author/school” (jia 家), I argue that, given the paucity of evidence, Sima Tan and Liu Xin should be credited with creating this tradition. The body of this article considers the definitions of Daoism given by these two scholars and all of the extant texts that Liu Xin classified as “Daoist.” Based on these texts, I then suggest an amended definition of Daoism. In the conclusion, I address the recent claim that the daojia 道家/daojiao 道教 dichotomy is false, speculating that disagreement over this claim arises from context in which Daoism is considered: among the other pre-Qin “schools of thought” or among other world religions.

Ge Hong’s Xian: Private Hermits and Public Alchemists by Thomas Michael

This article addresses the position of Ge Hong (283-343) in early medieval Daoism by provoking a reconsideration of earlier forms of Chinese religion. The article argues that Ge Hong’s greatest innovation was his bringing together two separate traditions of early Chinese religion, namely that of the xian (often translated as “immortal”) that I identify with early Daoism, and that of alchemy that somehow was related to the fangshi movement. The article examines the historical trajectory of these two traditions as Ge Hong received them by exploring two of his major works, the Baopuzi neipian and the Shenxian zhuan, and examines the ways in which he relates these two early traditions to each other. He does this by portraying and describing two kinds of xian, which I call “private” and “public.” The article shows that Ge Hong’s accomplishment had a deep and lasting impact of the future traditions of medieval Daoism.

Changing Views on Sexuality in Early and Medieval China Ping Yao

The discourse on sexuality underwent tremendous transformations in early and medieval China. While early imagery and terminology of sexual intercourse reflect a naturalistic attitude toward sexuality, writings from the Han dynasty and the division periods largely reflected the Daoist perception of body, gender, and sex. Such domination gradually gave way to a diverse discourse on sexuality in the Tang, largely due to Buddhist influence and the rise of the examination culture. Tang discourse on sexuality, with its emphasis on sensuality, pleasure, and spiritual bliss, shaped ideals of femininity, masculinity, and intercourse.

Daoist Wisdom for Teachers A Diary Study by David McLachlan Jeffrey

Daoist wisdom as presented in the Daode jing is the philosophy of living in harmony with Dao, considered as the way everything exists. It is one of the three main Chinese worldviews, alongside Confucianism and Buddhism. Its mystical and individualistic essence emphasizes a realization of virtue (de) through an appreciation of paradox and nonaction (wuwei) as well as choosing simplicity and spontaneity or naturalness (ziran) in place of complexity and impulsiveness through adherence to the three core values of compassion, moderation, and humility. Through the Daoist prism, everything coexists mutually and is interdependent because of the interaction of two interdependent elements known as yin and yang. These are not polar opposites but two sides of the same coin. Daoism regards all elements as being complementary in that each defines itself in relation to the other. With this come paradoxical notions of the seemingly weak overcoming the strong in the sense that flimsy bamboo yields to storms and survive while mighty oaks fall, and wind and water patiently flow around rocks while turning them into sand over time.

Please see the complete contents of Volume 8, 2015 -Freely Available online

Most recent issue (Volume 10, 2017) is available to subscribers online.

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Most Downloaded Journal Articles 2016

In 2016, our online journals content hosted by Project MUSE attracted visitors from nearly 2,300 institutions in 77 countries. The full-text of 500+ articles were downloaded nearly 100,000 times, with full issues downloaded 300,000 times. Here we share with you the top downloaded article for each of our titles in 2016.

Many of our journals have decades of history and it’s great to see archival content still relevant to readers today. China Review International’s most downloaded article is 20 years old, whereas The Contemporary Pacific and Philosophy East & West attracted the most downloads with 2016 content.

Enjoy these articles on MUSE and stay tuned for highlights from individual journals. You may sign up for TOC alerts for any of our journals here.

Asian Perspectives
The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific
Vol. 51, No. 2 (2002)
Material Practice and the Metamorphosis of a Sign: Early Buddhist Stupas and the Origin of Mahayana Buddhism” by Lars Fogelin

Asian Theatre Journal
Official Journal of the Association for Asian Performance

Vol. 22, No. 1 (Spring 2005)
NEE ENGEY: WHERE ARE YOU?” Media Review by Kathy Foley

Azalea
Journal of Korean Literature and Culture

Vol. 2 (2008)
Lingering Impressions of a Mountain Village—A Few Paragraphs from a Journal of Travels to Sŏngch’ŏn” by Yi Sang, translated by John Frankl

Biography
An Interdisciplinary Quarterly
Vol. 25, No. 2 (2002)
Biography Theory and Method:
 The Case of Samuel Johnson” by Carl Rollyson

Buddhist-Christian Studies
Official Journal of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies

Vol.  32 (2012)
Womanist” by Alice Walker Continue reading

Say hello to UH Press at AAS Booth 600

If you’re attending the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference in Toronto March 16-19, 2017, be sure to visit the University of Hawai’i Press at booth 600!

UH Press will have Asian studies books from our latest catalogs on display, as well as copies of the following journals:

We’re also proud to debut three online-only journals at AAS 2017:

Stop by and say hello as you browse through our display copies and catalogs. You may also pick up an order form at our booth or place your orders online at www.uhpress.hawaii.edu.

We look forward to seeing you in cold, snowy Toronto!

International Women’s Day

March 8 is International Women’s Day, celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. Today we share with you four articles from our archives featuring the lives of women from the U.S., Asia and the Pacific.

Issei Women and Work: Washerwoman, Prostitutes, Midwives and Barbers” by Kelli Y. Nakamura, Hawaiian Journal of History, Vol. 49, 2015.

Hawaiian Journal of History 49“[A]s women were paid less than men, many had to take on additional ‘women’s jobs’ like laundering, cooking, and sewing to ensure their families’ economic survival. . . . For Issei women, Hawai‘i offered unprecedented personal and economic opportunities, transforming traditional ideas of ‘proper’ gender roles in both America and Japan. By the necessity of engaging in different types of work, Issei women broke down the traditional divide that separated the domestic and public spheres.”

 


It’s Women’s Work” by Jenny Zorn, Yearbook of the Association for Pacific Coast Geographers, Vol. 69, 2007.

“Many of the women sitting out here today are the only woman in their department. That’s not easy. I was the first and only woman hired in my department in its 40-year history. Only last year was the second woman hired in that department.

“I found mentors in a variety of places: geographers at other campuses, people in other disciplines, and the principal at my kids’ elementary school. Wherever I saw a leader I could learn from, I watched, I read their biographies; I sought mentoring wherever I could find it.

“So I appreciate the differences I see. I appreciate the opportunities I’ve had that many before me did not.”


Traveling Stories, Colonial Intimacies, and Women’s Histories in Vanautu,” by Margaret Rodman, The Contemporary Pacific, Vol. 16, No. 2, Fall 2004.

“The story of the 1937 death of an eighteen-month-old girl named Wilhemina (Mina) Whitford in the care of her ni-Vanuatu nursemaid, Evelyn, frames this article. The Whitford’s version of this story was heard in the course of fieldwork with descendants of settler families. They tie Mina’s accidental death to an affair Evelyn was having with a male settler. What about Evelyn? How could she be located and her version of events recorded? More generally, how can the unwritten histories of women’s experiences be recovered in a Pacific island context? How can indigenous women write their own histories of gender in the contexts of colonial experience?”


Gender Politics in the Korean Transition to Democracy” by Jeong-Lim Nam in Korean Studies, Vol. 24, 2000.

untitled“Women’s activism in South Korea was shaped by their role in the opposition to military dictatorship. For example, their struggles against sexual torture and state violence mobilized opposition groups around the issues of human rights, social justice, and democratic politics. . . . Their contributions to the grassroots struggles were crucial in determining the outcome of their activism, illustrating the importance of women’s roles in the Korean transition to democracy. Although these groups had different interests and goals, their mobilization and protests converged on the strategy of the opposition to the inhumane ruling of the military government.”

Learn more about UHP journals here.

UH Press selects Project MUSE as hosting partner

project-muse_final-logoThe University of Hawai‘i Press is pleased to announce the selection of Project MUSE to host, manage, and deliver UH Press journal content to our growing audience of librarians and readers.

“Selecting Project MUSE as our hosting partner just makes good sense. As an academic publisher, we feel Project MUSE is the logical choice since their platform was designed by the academic community for the academic community,” said Pamela Wilson, Journals Manager at UH Press.

The Project MUSE platform has linking relationships with indexing, abstracting and search services, which facilitate access to content. The platform also allows users to:

  • Search across books and journals in one place and at the same time
  • Share discoveries with colleagues on social media
  • Access book and journal table of contents and sample full-text journal articles and book-chapters for free
  • Sign up for RSS Feeds
  • Sign up for email alerts
  • Save citations from the browse and search interface
  • Save searches and view search history for the current session
  • Browse related content
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The hosting platform and content may be viewed online here: http://muse.jhu.edu/browse/publishers/hawaii

“Project MUSE is pleased to partner with the University of Hawai‘i Press to host and deliver all of their journal content for both institutional access and individual readers,” said Wendy Queen, Director, Project MUSE. “This marks a significant step for MUSE in the direction of providing customized solutions for our participating publishers, offering them more options for serving their content on a platform that operates from within the scholarly community and seeks to balance the needs of presses, libraries, authors and readers.”

Click here to read the complete press release.

Journal of Daoist Studies, Volume 10 (2017)

The University of Hawai’i Press is pleased to announce the availability of Volume 10, 2017 of the Journal of Daoist Studies.

The Journal of Daoist Studies (JDS) is an annual publication dedicated to the scholarly exploration of Daoism in all its different dimensions. Each issue has three main parts: Academic Articles on history, philosophy, art, society, and more (limit 8,500 words); Forum on Contemporary Practice on issues of current activities both in China and other parts of the world (limit 5,000 words); and News of the Field, presenting publications, dissertations, conferences and websites.

Subscribers receive access to the complete back content of the journal.

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Table-of-Contents Volume 10, 2017

Articles
Zhuangzi and Wittgenstein on the Self by Yumin Ao and Ulrich Steinvorth

Xu Mi’s Network: A Different Perspective on Early Higher Clarity Daoism by Thomas E. Smith

The Formation of a Daoist Pictorial Iconography in the Tang by Patricia Eichenbaum Karetzky

Daoist Seals, Part One: Activation and Fashioning by Shih-Shan Susan Huang

Daoist Ritual Manuals in Vietnam: Activating Stars and Trigrams by Ekaterina Zavidovskaia

Forum on Contemporary Practice
Daoist Literary Criticism by John Leonard

Daoist Visions of the Dream State by Esmaeil Radpour 

Ways to Immortality: In Popular and Daoist Tales by Wang Xiaoyang and Bao Yan

Physics, Physicality, and Physiology: The Foundation of Daoist Self-Cultivation by Steve Jackowicz

Daoism and Peace Psychology by Ron Catabia

The American Transformation of Daoist Cultivation by Livia Kohn

The Caishan Goddess Temple: Then and Now by Wei Yanli

News of the Field
Obituaries: Tan Dajiang 谭大江

Publications 

Conferences

Subscribe to the journal to gain online access to all content of the journal. Features of the platform include:

  • Social networking options for sharing discoveries with colleagues
  • Sign-up for RSS feeds
  • Sign-up for Email alerts
  • Save citations from the browse and search interface
  • Save searches and view search history for the current session
  • Listing of frequently downloaded content
  • Related content displayed
  • Search across books and journals from the Univ. of Hawai‘i Press