Philosophy East and West, vol. 67, no. 1 (2017)

This quarter’s journal of comparative Eastern and Western philosophies includes the following scholarly works:

Special Feature: Joseph Chan’s Confucian Perfectionism

Confucian Authority, Political Right, and Democracy
by Sungmoon Kim

Confucian Justification of Limited Government: Comments on Joseph Chan’s Confucian Perfectionism
by Stephen C. Angle

Institutional Structures and Idealism of Character
by David B. Wong

Education as a Human Right: A Confucian Perspective
by Chenyang Li

Democracy without Autonomy: Moral and Personal Autonomy in Democratic Confucianism
by Yvonne Chiu

On How to Construct a Confucian Democracy for Modern Times (or Why Democratic Practices Must Not Sight of the Ideal)
by Roger T. Ames

Confucian Perfectionism: A Response to Kim, Angle, Wong, Li, Chiu, and Ames
by Joseph Chan

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The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 28 no. 2 (2017)

From artist Lisa Reihana featured in this issue. Dandy, 2007. Countering stereotypical depictions of Māori masculinity, strength, and prowess that focus on physical accomplishments on the battlefield or rugby playgrounds, Reihana’s Dandy, with full-face moko (tattoo) and Victorian attire, asserts a quietly confident sense of elegance and poise.

This issue of The Contemporary Pacific features a look at public murals in a Kanaka Maoli context, political reviews, the work of artist Lisa Reihana, book and media reviews, and the following articles:

  • Walls of Empowerment: Reading Public Murals in a Kanaka Maoli Context by A Mārata Ketekiri Tamaira
  • Traveling Houses: Preforming Diasporic Relationships in Europe by A-Chr (Tina) Engels-Schwarzpaul
  • CEDAW Smokescreens: Gender Politics in Contemporary Tonga by Helen Lee

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Early Release Articles: Philosophy East and West

University of Hawai’i Press is proud to present the early release of the following articles from Philosophy East and West: A Quarterly of Comparative Philosophy through a partnership with Project MUSE.

EARLY RELEASE ARTICLES

Browse all abstracts and HTML versions of Philosophy East and West early release articles online here.

Please note: Early release manuscripts have gone through a rigorous peer-review process and will appear in a future issue of the journal. However, articles have not yet been through the full production process and therefore appear in their original manuscript form, which may contain errors. These articles will be removed from the early release page once they are published as part of an issue.

Stay tuned for more early release articles from UH Press journals in 2017.

Review of Story is a Vagabond (MĀNOA 27:1)

Manoa 27:1 Story is A Vagabond, Intizar HusainAsymptote Journal features a compelling review of Story is a Vagabond: Fiction, Essays and Drama by Intizar Husain, published by MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing (27:1, 2015) and UH Press.

One of Pakistan’s most distinguished writers, Intizar Husain was born in India in 1923 and immigrated to Pakistan during the Partition. An internationally acclaimed writer, critic, and translator, he has published seven volumes of short stories, four novels, and a novella, as well as travelogues, memoirs, and critical essays. Despite his importance to world literature for over six decades, Husain’s writing is little known in English translation. Story is a Vagabond is the first collection in English to show the breadth of his thoughtful, innovative, and compassionate work.

Reviewer Aamer Hussein writes that the editors of this special issue managed “a level of translucence through which Husain’s distinctive intonations echo and resound.” Read the review online here.

Order your copy of Story is a Vagabond from UH Press.

Browse content online via Project MUSE.

Subscribe to MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing

Biography Vol. 39 No. 3 (2016)

From “Te Ao Hurihuri O Ngā Taonga Tuku Iho: The Evolving Worlds of Our Ancestral Treasures” in this issue. Drawings of Korokoro of Ngare Raumati by his brother Tuai (now in Birmingham University Special Collaborations CMS/ACC14 C2, and Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries GNZMMS 147).

This quarter’s special issue examines Indigenous Conversations about Biography with guest editors Alice Te Punga Somerville, Daniel Heath Justice, and Noelani Arista.

Editors’ Introduction

From “Kei Wareware”: Remembering Te Rauparaha in this issue. William Bambridge, Sketch of Te Rauparaha. Diary. Ref: QMS-0122-140A. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand.

This is a conversation about Indigenous lives, the ways we understand them, the ways we represent them, and the responsibilities that come from doing this work in a good way. And this is just a beginning. We are honored to welcome you to this special issue of Biography, and to the Indigenous scholars, artists, and visionaries who come together in community on the topic of Indigenous biography. Some of this diverse group of Indigenous thinkers came together in person in Mānoa Valley on the Hawaiian island of O‘ahu, traveling from the Indigenous territories claimed by New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and the United States to take up the challenges, questions, concerns, and possibilities of representing Indigenous lives.

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Pacific Science, vol. 71, no. 1 (2017)

From ‘Range Expansion of the Small Carpenter Bee Ceratina smaragdula across the Hawaiian Archipelago with Potential Ecological Implications for Native Pollinator Systems’ in this issue. Female (left) and male (right) Ceratina (Pithitis) smaragdula: face, a, b; dorsal view, c, d; lateral view, e, f. Body length is between 6 and 8 mm on average. Note relatively prominent facial maculation and black abdominal patches of the male.

Preview Pacific Science, vol. 71 no. 1 with the following article free for all from Bio-One:

New Species of Stylasterid (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa: Anthoathecata: Stylasteridae) from the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands by Stephen D. Cairns

Also inside this quarter’s issue, Wyatt A. Shell examines small green carpenter bee range expansion in Hawai’i:

Invasive bee species may have a widely detrimental impact on their novel host ecosystem. Introduced bees can rapidly disrupt native plantpollinator mutualisms through competition with indigenous pollinator fauna and facilitation of invasive flora reproduction. […] Here we present a comprehensive synthesis of C. smaragdula’s known biological and ecological history, as well as a population genetic analysis of C. smaragdula from Maui, and from locations across its native range, at the cytochrome oxidase I (COI ) locus. We update C. smaragdula’s known distribution and occurrence elevation in Hawai‘i and reveal a lack of genetic structure between Hawaiian and native range populations.

Scholarly articles in this issue:

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Curve of the Hook: An Archaeologist in Polynesia (MANOA 28-1)

This issue of MĀNOA (28-1), Curve of the Hook: An Archaeologist in Polynesia is a booklength interview with Dr. Yosihiko Sinoto, known for the astonishing archaeological discoveries that changed our ideas of the ancient Polynesians, their ways of life, and their legendary voyages across the Pacific. Dr. Sinoto’s discoveries included whale-tooth pendants, stone tools and weapons, sacred structures, dwellings, an ancient voyaging canoe, and finely made fishhooks that allowed him and his fellow archaeologists to chart the seafaring routes of early Polynesians.

Now, in Curve of the Hook, we can experience the extraordinary adventures and career of an eminent and celebrated archaeologist in Polynesia. This full-color book includes over 100 illustrations—including unpublished photos from Dr. Sinoto’s private collection—plus notes and a list of references.

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