Hawaiian Journal of History, Vol. 51 (2017)


This year marks the 125th anniversary of the Hawaiian Historical Society, and in recognition of this anniversary, the society has printed its logo on the cover of its annual volume of The Hawaiian Journal of History. The logo was redesigned in 1977 and, according to an introduction by Shari Y. Tamashiro:

The two islands represent the Hawaiian Islands, the double-hulled sailing canoe represents the culture of the Native Hawaiians who found and settled the islands, and the three-masted sailing ship represents the cultures of the non-Hawaiians who followed.

The society publishes books in both English and Hawaiian, and HJH is a leading peer-reviewed journal that focuses on the history of Native Hawaiians and all other cultures in Hawai‘i during both pre- and post-contact times.

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Journal of Korean Religions, vol. 8, no. 2 (October 2017)

Journal of Korean Religions vol. 8, no. 2, a special issue on Religion and Media in Korea, features the following articles by scholars.

Special Issue: Religion and Media in Korea

Guest Editors: Kyuhoon Cho, Sam Han, and Jin Kyu Park

In contemporary social life, religion and media cannot be said to be separated. Contrary to the long-lasting understanding that the two are independent from each other, the spheres of religion and media are closely intertwined. Dynamic and increasing connections have been observed and reported by a range of scholars. Indeed, the scholarly interest in the relationship is a fairly recent one. Only thirty years ago, religion was just a blind spot within media studies (Hoover and Venturelli 1996). Similarly, media were an overlooked issue in religious studies.

Special issue articles include:

  • A History of Religious Broadcasting in Korea from a Religious Politics Standpoint: Focusing on the Period of a Protestant Broadcasting Monopoly
    by Sungmin Lee
  • The Role of Newspapers in the Early Korean Protestant Community: An Analysis of The Korean Christian Advocate and The Christian News
    by Minjung Noh
  • Religion in the Press: The Construction of Religion in the Korean News Media
    by Kyuhoon Cho
  • The Culture-Religion Nexus: (Neo-)Durkheimianism and Mediatized Confucianism in Korean “Piety Travel”
    by Sam Han
  • Authenticity, Brand Culture, and Templestay in the Digital Era: The Ambivalence and In-Betweenness of Korean Buddhism
    by Seung Soo Kim

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Religion and Philosophy Journals from the University of Hawai`i Press

00_BCS 37_c1 and c4_REVA scholarly journal devoted to Buddhism and Christianity and their historical and contemporary interrelationships, Buddhist-Christian Studies presents thoughtful articles, conference reports, and book reviews. It also includes sections on comparative methodology and historical comparisons, as well as ongoing discussions from two dialogue conferences: the Theological Encounter with Buddhism, and the Japan Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies.

Submission guidelines for BCS are available online. 

 

jdsThe Journal of Daoist Studies (JDS) is an annual publication dedicated to the scholarly exploration of Daoism in all its different dimensions. Each issue has three main parts: Academic Articles on history, philosophy, art,society, and more (limit 8,500 words); Forum on Contemporary Practice on issues of current activities both in China and other parts of the world (limit 5,000 words); and News of the Field, presenting publications, dissertations, conferences and websites.

For submission guidelines please contact daojournal@gmail.com.

 

jksThe Journal of Korean Religions is the only English-language academic journal dedicated to the study of Korean religions. It aims to stimulate interest in and research on Korean religions across a range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Launched in 2010 by the Institute for the Study of Religion at Sogang University in Korea, it is peer-reviewed and published twice yearly, in April and October.

Submission guidelines for JKR are available online.

 

Promoting academic literacy on non-Western traditions of philosophy, Philosophy East PEWand West has for over half a century published the highest-quality scholarship that locates these cultures in their relationship to Anglo-American philosophy. Philosophy defined in its relationship to cultural traditions broadly integrates the professional discipline with literature, science, and social practices. Each issue includes debates on issues of contemporary concern and critical reviews of the most recent publications.

Submission guidelines for PEW are available online.

 

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For more information on the University of Hawai`i Press and our journal publications, visit  www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/journals. To receive table-of-contents email alerts for these publications, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.

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Interview: Buddhist-Christian Studies editors

Buddhist-Christian Studies is one of four society journals currently published by University of Hawai`i Press. The journal started here in Honolulu as the product of the 1980 East-West Religions Project conference titled “A Buddhist-Christian Conference on the Future of Humanity,” and it was first edited by UH professor emeritus David W. Chappell. We asked current co-editors Thomas Cattoi and Carol Anderson to share more about the society and the journal’s focus.

sbcs

First, what is the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies?

The Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies was founded in 1987 in order to continue interactions between Buddhist and Christian scholars and practitioners that began at several large international meetings in the early 1980s. In 1980 and again in 1984 two major international conferences were held at the University of Hawai’i, which led to the establishment of the “Cobb-Abe International Theological Encounter.” The latter was founded by process theologian John B. Cobb, Jr., and Kyoto-school philosopher Masao Abe; for the following twenty years (1984-2004), the Cobb-Abe group continued to meet every eighteen months to discuss issues connected with Buddhist-Christian dialogue.

In 1987, another large international conference on Buddhist-Christian interchange was held at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley.  At that meeting, a small group of scholars and practitioners decided to establish a society that could meet annually in conjunction with the American Academy of Religion (AAR). This led to the birth of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies. The Society is independent of the AAR and controls its own program, rather than being a section of the AAR. Most members are scholars and graduate students in the field of Buddhist-Christian studies, but membership is open to all.

Has Buddhist-Christian Studies changed over the years?

The first issue of the journal was published in 1981. Its content and orientation reflects the evolution of the field over the last few decades, which was influenced by the quick expansion of Buddhist and Asian studies in English-language universities, as well as the growing interest in interreligious dialogue in different Christian communities.

Thomas Cattoi

Thomas Cattoi, co-editor of Buddhist-Christian Studies

What makes a good interreligious dialogue?

This is an interesting question! Every person engaged in interreligious dialogue will give you a different answer. For me (Cattoi), interreligious dialogue requires the ability to be conversant in two different religious traditions, remaining grounded in one’s own while also engaging the other with integrity. This means that one should be open to points of contact between two traditions, while also acknowledging the presence of irreducible differences.

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Early Release Article: Korean Studies, November 2017

University of Hawai’i Press is proud to present the early release of the following article from Korean Studies through a partnership with Project MUSE.

EARLY RELEASE ARTICLE

Implicit Political and Economic Liberties in the Thought of Tasan Chŏng Yagyong by Yi Jongwoo

Abstract: Two types of implicit liberty were the foremost features of the philosophy produced by Tasan Chŏng Yagyong (1762–1836), a Confucian scholar of the Chosŏn dynasty in Korea. The first was political liberty, which enabled people to select and dismiss their ruler. Tasan’s notion of political liberty included a stern admonition to rulers and local officials, stipulating that if they collected unfair taxes from the people, the people had the right to take necessary actions to survive. The second was economic liberty, which enabled people to relocate to another village for financial reasons in the hamlet- field system. Under the well-field system, rulers distributed their farmland among the people equally for their personal use, and therefore they were not tenant farmers. Economic liberty was implicit and advocated that the people lead lives that were consistent with Confucian moral principles.

Browse all Korean Studies early release articles online here.

Please note: Early release manuscripts have been through our rigorous peer-review process, accepted for publication, and copyedited. These articles will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal. These articles have not yet been through the full production process and therefore may contain errors. These articles will be removed from the early release page once they are published as part of an issue.

Stay tuned for more early release articles from UH Press journals.

Philosophy East and West, vol. 67, no. 4 (October 2017)

This quarter’s journal of comparative Eastern and Western philosophies is a Special Issue entitled: Eleventh East-West Philosophers’ Conference, “State-of-the-Art on Comparative Philosophy” with guest editor Ron Bontekoe and includes the following scholarly works:

In Memoriam

Remembering Jiyuan Yu
by Chenyang Li

special issue articles

Some Opening Remarks on the Exclusionary Tendency in Western Philosophy
by Ron Bontekoe

The Place of Philosophy
by Danielle Macbeth

Response to Danielle Macbeth, “The Place of Philosophy”
by Stephen C. Angle

Reply to Stephen Angle
by Danielle Macbeth

Ethnocentrism and Multiculturalism in Contemporary Philosophy
by Brian Bruya

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Asian Perspectives, vol. 56, no. 2 (2017)

From “Biocultural Practices during the Transition to History at the Vat Komnou Cemetery, Angkor Borei, Cambodia” in this issue. Top image: Probable intentionally stained teeth of Vat Komnou Burial 43B, a 45–55+ year-old male. Photo by Rona Ikehara-Quebral. Bottom image: Filed maxillary permanent left incisors and canine of Vat Komnou Burial 36, a 35–45-year-old male. A periapical cavity surrounds the canine root. Photo by Rona Ikehara-Quebral.

 

This issue of Asian Perspectives also features the following scholarly works: Continue reading