Tag Archives: Asian Culture

Call for Papers: Cross-Currents

The editorial board of Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review—a joint project of the Research Institute of Korean Studies (RIKS) at Korea University and the Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS) at the University of California, Berkeley—is currently accepting submissions of research articles, as well as proposals for special issues and photo essays.

Cross-Currents is a peer-reviewed, open-access, quarterly online and semi-annual print journal that offers its readers up-to-date research findings, emerging trends, and cutting-edge perspectives concerning East Asian history and culture from scholars in both English-speaking and Asian language-speaking academic communities.

The journal seeks to balance issues traditionally addressed by Western humanities and social science journals with issues of immediate concern to scholars in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. This English-language journal includes scholarship on material from the 16th century to the present day that has significant implications for current models of understanding East Asian history and culture.

Embedded in a web-based platform with functions for collaboration, discussion, and an innovative publishing process, the e-journal uses new technologies to facilitate a dialogue among East Asia scholars around the world that is enhanced by audio-visual and multilingual capabilities. The semi-annual print issues of Cross-Currents (available through University of Hawai‘i Press and Project MUSE) feature research articles from the e-journal (the journal of record for indexing and citation purposes).

Complete information on how to prepare and submit articles and proposals may be found online here.

Cross-Currents is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI), Scopus, the Bibliography of Asian Studies, the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), and Project MUSE. The e-journal operates under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical-NoDerivs 3.0 United States License. 

Please email inquiries to the Managing Editor at crosscurrents@berkeley.edu.


About the Journal

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review offers its readers up-to-date research findings, emerging trends, and cutting-edge perspectives on material from the sixteenth century to the present day that have significant implications for current models of understanding East Asian history and culture. Its semiannual print issues feature peer-reviewed content from the online version of the journal.

 Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions are available through UH Press.

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Cross-Currents, vol. 6, no. 1 (2017)

From Cartographic Anxieties in Mongolia: The Bogd Khan’s Picture-Map Uranchimeg Tsultemin. Bhavacakra, the Buddhist Wheel of Life. Thangka painting, Central Tibet, late nineteenth century. Source: Theos Bernard-Eleanor Murray collection, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive.

 

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review volume 6, number 1 is now available and features the following articles.

Cartographic Anxieties

  • Introduction to “Cartographic Anxieties” by Franck Bille
  • Fishers and Territorial Anxieties in China and Vietnam: Narratives of the South China Sea Beyond the Frame of the Nation by Edyta Roszko
  • The Da Ming Hunyi: Repurposing a Ming Map in Sino-African Diplomancy by Alexander Akin
  • Cartographic Anxieties in Mongolia: The Bogd Khan’s Picture-Map by Uranchimeg Tsultemin
  • On China’s Cartographic Embrace: A View from Its Northern Rim by Franck Bille
  • A Spectacle of Maps: Cartographic Hopes and Anxieties in the Pamirs by Martin Saxer

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Cross-Currents, vol. 5, no. 2 (2016)

From “Guozhuang Trading Houses and Tibetan Middlemen in Dartsedo, the ‘Shanghai of Tibet'” in this issue. Photograph of Chu-nyi Barpa achak khapa (Ch. Qiujia guozhuang) taken by Sun Mingjing, 1944.

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review volume 5, number 2 is now available and features the following articles.

Frontier Tibet: Trade and Boundaries of Authority in Kham

  • Introduction to “Frontier Tibet: Trade and Boundaries of Authority in Kham” by Stephane Gros
  • “To Control Tibet, First Pacify Kham”: Trade Routes and “Official Routes” (Guandao) in Easternmost Kham by Partrick Booz
  • Construction Work and Wages at the Dergé Printing House in the Eighteenth Century by Remi Chaix
  • Guozhuang Trading Houses and Tibetan Middlemen in Dartsedo, the “Shanghai of Tibet” by Yudru Tsomu
  • Victorianizing Guangxu: Arresting Flows, Minting Coins, and
    Exerting Authority in Early Twentieth-Century Kham by Scott Relyea
  • Tricks of the Trade: Debt and Imposed Sovereignty in Southernmost Kham in the Nineteenth to Twentieth Centuries by Stephane Gros
  • Memory Politics at Work in a Gyalrong Revolt in the Early Twentieth Century by Jinba Tenzin
  • Afterword: Why Kham? Why Borderlands? Coordinating New
    Research Programs for Asia by C. Patterson Giersch

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Cross-Currents, vol. 5, no. 1 (2016)

01_CC 5-1 Greene_Page_15_Image_0001

Tiles from the proposed version of reformed mahjong mentioned in “The Game People Played” by Maggie Greene in this issue. From the right, tiles include government types, classes of citizens, countries, continents, oceans, and technology.

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review volume 5, number 1 is now available and features the following articles:

  • The Game People Played: Mahjong in Modern Chinese Society and Culture by Maggie Greene
  • The Afterlives of An Chunggŭn in Republican China: From Sinocentric Appropriation to a Rupture in Nationalism by Inhye Han
  • Against the Nihilism of Suffering and Death: Richard E.K. Kim and His Works by Jooyeon Rhee
  • Street Theater and Subject Formation in Wartime China: Toward a New Form of Public Art by Xiaobing Tang
  • Domesticating Hybridity: Straits Chinese Cultural Heritage Projects in Malaysia and Singapore by Karen M. Teoh
  • A Russian Radical and East Asia in the Early Twentieth Century: Sudzilovsky, China, and Japan by Vladimir Tikhonov (Pak Noja)
  • Imagining Urban Community: Contested Geographies and Parallax Urban Dreams on Cheju Island, South Korea by Tommy Tran

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