Tag Archives: Autobiography

Fall 2017 Biography Brown Bag Series

The editors of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly and directors of the Center for Biographical Research at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa have announced their Fall 2017 schedule of Biography Brown Bags.

If you’re in Hawai’i, don’t miss this exciting line-up of speakers here to talk about life writing. Each event listed below is held from noon to 1:15 p.m. Thursdays in Kuykendall Room 409 at UH Mānoa. Bring your lunch and enjoy!

Sept. 14: Noenoe K. Silva, a contributor to The Hawaiian Journal of History, on ‘Elua Maka Kila: How Joseph Kānepu’u and Joseph Poepoe Contributed to the Life of ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i

Sept. 21: Daven Chang on Composing Mele for Community

Sept. 28: Kyle Kajihiro on Mehameha Wale No O Pu’uloa, I Ka Hele A Ka’ahupāhau: Lonely Was Pu’uloa when Ka’ahupāhau Went Away

Oct. 5: Virgie Chattergy on Pinay: Culture Bearers of the Filipino Diaspora

Oct. 12: Carla Manfredi on Little House in the Bush: Afterlives of Vailima

Oct. 19: Patricia Steinhoff on her UH Press book, Destiny: The Secret Operations of the Yodogō Exiles

Oct. 26: Otto Heim on Pacific Ghost Stories: John Kneubuhl and Oral History

Nov. 2: Sandra Bonura, on her UH Press book, Light in the Queen’s Garden: Ida May Pope, Pioneer for Hawai‘i’s Daughters, 1862–1914

Nov. 9: Lauren Nishimura on Hawaiian Ancestry: Positioning Indigeneity in the Na’i Aupuni Biographies

Nov. 16: Kim Compoc on American Tutelage Gone Awry: Antonio Taguba, Filipino Americanism, and the Critique of Torture

Nov. 30: Anna Feurstein on The Animal That Therefore I Am Not: The Politics of Animal (Auto)biography from Black Beauty to Cat Internet Videos

See flyer below or visit CBR’s Facebook page for more details.

Read Biography archives at Project MUSE

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Biography Vol. 40 No. 1 (Winter 2017)

Jaya Daronde, Relationship, oil on canvas. From Caste Life Narratives, Visual Representation, and Protected Ignorance in this issue. Copyright and reproduced courtesy of the artist.

This special issue of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly focuses on Caste and Life Narratives. From the guest editors:

Life narratives ranging from autobiographies and biographies to blogs and pictorial art have historically played a vital role in both the affirmation as well as interrogation of caste identities. However, serious study of life narratives in relationship to caste is still relatively underdeveloped. The scholarship on caste (or the varna-jati complex) is vast, as is the study of life narratives as a genre—it is the conjunction of the two that especially merits sustained scrutiny. The study of caste is animated by a Critical Caste Studies that takes its bearing from Dalit Studies, a lively area of scholarly endeavor in recent years, in order to explore diverse phenomena within the varna-jati complex. The scrutiny of life narratives in conjunction with caste promises to expand the scope of inquiry into life narratives by bringing new cultural contexts into the discussion and by enabling the formulation of new theoretical questions of genre. Such an investigation contributes to the study of caste by directing attention to fresh archives and by making available for analysis in powerful ways questions of identity. The critical work of studying caste in conjunction with life narratives is most pertinent with regard to India but includes the South Asian diaspora as well as other countries such as Japan.

— Editors’ Introduction: “My Birth Is My Fatal Accident”: Introduction to Caste and Life Narratives by S. Shankar and Charu Gupta

Literary Lives

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Biography Vol. 39 No. 4 (2016)

This image of Stan Schab, managing editor of Biography from 1994—2016, accompanies the announcement for the Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Service, which he received in 2007.

This quarter’s issue says farewell to retiring managing editor Stan Schab and welcomes new managing editor Anjoli Roy.

Read the special section for free online at Project MUSE: 

Editors’ Note (Free)

Tributes to Stan Schab (Free)

With words from editors and contributors Craig Howes, Cynthia G. Franklin, John David Zuern, Leigh Gilmore, Sidonie Smith, Gillian Whitlock, Aiko Yamashiro, and Anjoli Roy

Welcome to Anjoli Roy (free)

From Craig Howes, Cynthia G. Franklin, and  John David Zuern

Articles

  • Digression, Slavery, and Failing to Return in the Narrative of the Sufferings of Lewis Clarke
    by Michael A. Chaney
  • Making and Unmaking: Child-Soldier Memoirs and Human Rights Readers
    by Maureen Moynagh

International year in review

…We hope that the feature debuting in this issue, the International Year in Review, will help begin a process that will lead to more books, articles, essays, and dissertations from an even wider variety of languages appearing in our critical bibliography. (From Editors’ Note)

  • International Year in Review: Introduction
    by John David Zuern
  • Pictures at an Exhibition: The Year in Australia
    by Gillian Whitlock
  • Biography in Austria, a Selection: The Year in Austria
    by Wilhelm Hemecker and David Osterle
  • Public Lives as Personal Assets, the Trial of Biography: The Year in Brazil
    by Sergio da Silva Barcellos
  • Trust Reconciliation in Life Writing: The Year in Canada
    by Alana Bell
  • Nostalgia for Republican China: The Year in China
    by Chen Shen
  • Old Traditions and New Experiments: The Year in Finland

Plus more from the year in review and book reviews. Continue reading

Biography Vol. 39 No. 3 (2016)

From “Te Ao Hurihuri O Ngā Taonga Tuku Iho: The Evolving Worlds of Our Ancestral Treasures” in this issue. Drawings of Korokoro of Ngare Raumati by his brother Tuai (now in Birmingham University Special Collaborations CMS/ACC14 C2, and Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries GNZMMS 147).

This quarter’s special issue examines Indigenous Conversations about Biography with guest editors Alice Te Punga Somerville, Daniel Heath Justice, and Noelani Arista.

Editors’ Introduction

From “Kei Wareware”: Remembering Te Rauparaha in this issue. William Bambridge, Sketch of Te Rauparaha. Diary. Ref: QMS-0122-140A. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand.

This is a conversation about Indigenous lives, the ways we understand them, the ways we represent them, and the responsibilities that come from doing this work in a good way. And this is just a beginning. We are honored to welcome you to this special issue of Biography, and to the Indigenous scholars, artists, and visionaries who come together in community on the topic of Indigenous biography. Some of this diverse group of Indigenous thinkers came together in person in Mānoa Valley on the Hawaiian island of O‘ahu, traveling from the Indigenous territories claimed by New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and the United States to take up the challenges, questions, concerns, and possibilities of representing Indigenous lives.

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Biography Vol. 39 No. 2 (2016)

Figure 6. From page 48 of Bhimayana: Experiences of Untouchability, by Srividya Natarajan and S. Anand; Art by Durgabai Vyam and Subhash Vyam. © Copyright 2011 and reproduced by permission of the authors.

From Radical Graphics: Martin Luther King, Jr., B. R. Ambedkar, and Comics Auto/Biography in this issue. Figure 6. From page 48 of Bhimayana: Experiences of Untouchability, by Srividya Natarajan and S. Anand; Art by Durgabai Vyam and Subhash Vyam. © Copyright 2011 and reproduced by permission of the authors.

This quarter’s Biography contains the following interdisciplinary scholarly works including Pramod K. Nayar’s article on ‘radical’ graphic novels:

From Radical Graphics: Martin Luther King, Jr., B. R. Ambedkar, and Comics Auto/Biography in this issue. Figure 2. From page 58 of King: A Comics Biography, by Ho Che Anderson. © Copyright 2010, and reproduced by courtesy of Fantagraphics.

In the midst of the memoir boom of the late twentieth century, a sub-genre
in a wholly new medium made its presence felt: the graphic memoir and auto/biography. Using Ho Che Anderson’s King (1993–2002, published in a single edition in 2010) about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and S. Anand and Srividya Natarajan’s Bhimayana (2011, with art by Durgabai Vyam and Subhash Vyam), about the Indian social reformer, maker of the Indian Constitution, and leader of the so-called “untouchables” (“lower-castes” in the Hindu social order, now called “Dalits”), Dr. Bhim Rao Ambedkar, I will argue that graphic auto/biography offers a new mode in which to talk about social issues like racism and caste-based oppression.

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