Tag Archives: china

Journal of Daoist Studies, Volume 10 (2017)

The University of Hawai’i Press is pleased to announce the availability of Volume 10, 2017 of the Journal of Daoist Studies.

The Journal of Daoist Studies (JDS) is an annual publication dedicated to the scholarly exploration of Daoism in all its different dimensions. Each issue has three main parts: Academic Articles on history, philosophy, art, society, and more (limit 8,500 words); Forum on Contemporary Practice on issues of current activities both in China and other parts of the world (limit 5,000 words); and News of the Field, presenting publications, dissertations, conferences and websites.

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Table-of-Contents Volume 10, 2017

Articles
Zhuangzi and Wittgenstein on the Self by Yumin Ao and Ulrich Steinvorth

Xu Mi’s Network: A Different Perspective on Early Higher Clarity Daoism by Thomas E. Smith

The Formation of a Daoist Pictorial Iconography in the Tang by Patricia Eichenbaum Karetzky

Daoist Seals, Part One: Activation and Fashioning by Shih-Shan Susan Huang

Daoist Ritual Manuals in Vietnam: Activating Stars and Trigrams by Ekaterina Zavidovskaia

Forum on Contemporary Practice
Daoist Literary Criticism by John Leonard

Daoist Visions of the Dream State by Esmaeil Radpour 

Ways to Immortality: In Popular and Daoist Tales by Wang Xiaoyang and Bao Yan

Physics, Physicality, and Physiology: The Foundation of Daoist Self-Cultivation by Steve Jackowicz

Daoism and Peace Psychology by Ron Catabia

The American Transformation of Daoist Cultivation by Livia Kohn

The Caishan Goddess Temple: Then and Now by Wei Yanli

News of the Field
Obituaries: Tan Dajiang 谭大江

Publications 

Conferences

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Red Peonies: Two Novellas of China (MĀNOA 28:2)

From this issue: Duplication, Image 5 , 2003 by Xing Danwen.

Red Peonies is the first English translation of The Woman Liu and The Woman Yang—two novellas by Chinese writer Zhang Yihe.

In 1970, when she was 28, Zhang was convicted of being a counter-revolutionary and sentenced to two decades in a remote prison labor camp. With empathy and grace, Zhang tells the stories of Liu Yueying and Yang Fenfang, two women she met at the camp.

Of her novellas, Zhang says, “They are not about politics or the system but about the tragic destinies of these young female prisoners.” Continue reading

China Review International, vol. 21, no. 3&4 (2014)

This double-issue of China Review International: A Journal of Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese Studies includes two features and more than 10 reviews:

FEATUREs

Sashimi and History: On a New Translation of Du Fu (reviewing Stephen Owen, editor and translator; Paul Kroll and Ding Xiang Warner, editors, The Poetry of Du Fu) by Nicholas Morrow Williams

Superior Chinese Proficiency and Global Debate (reviewing Dana Scott Bourgerie, Rachel Yu Liu, and Lin Qi; Tony Brown and Jennifer Bown, consulting editors, Mastering Chinese through Global Debate) by Song Jiang

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Early Release Articles: Philosophy East and West

University of Hawai’i Press is proud to present the early release of the following articles from Philosophy East and West: A Quarterly of Comparative Philosophy through a partnership with Project MUSE.

EARLY RELEASE ARTICLES

Browse all abstracts and HTML versions of Philosophy East and West early release articles online here.

Please note: Early release manuscripts have gone through a rigorous peer-review process and will appear in a future issue of the journal. However, articles have not yet been through the full production process and therefore appear in their original manuscript form, which may contain errors. These articles will be removed from the early release page once they are published as part of an issue.

Stay tuned for more early release articles from UH Press journals in 2017.

Cross-Currents, vol. 5, no. 2 (2016)

From “Guozhuang Trading Houses and Tibetan Middlemen in Dartsedo, the ‘Shanghai of Tibet'” in this issue. Photograph of Chu-nyi Barpa achak khapa (Ch. Qiujia guozhuang) taken by Sun Mingjing, 1944.

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review volume 5, number 2 is now available and features the following articles.

Frontier Tibet: Trade and Boundaries of Authority in Kham

  • Introduction to “Frontier Tibet: Trade and Boundaries of Authority in Kham” by Stephane Gros
  • “To Control Tibet, First Pacify Kham”: Trade Routes and “Official Routes” (Guandao) in Easternmost Kham by Partrick Booz
  • Construction Work and Wages at the Dergé Printing House in the Eighteenth Century by Remi Chaix
  • Guozhuang Trading Houses and Tibetan Middlemen in Dartsedo, the “Shanghai of Tibet” by Yudru Tsomu
  • Victorianizing Guangxu: Arresting Flows, Minting Coins, and
    Exerting Authority in Early Twentieth-Century Kham by Scott Relyea
  • Tricks of the Trade: Debt and Imposed Sovereignty in Southernmost Kham in the Nineteenth to Twentieth Centuries by Stephane Gros
  • Memory Politics at Work in a Gyalrong Revolt in the Early Twentieth Century by Jinba Tenzin
  • Afterword: Why Kham? Why Borderlands? Coordinating New
    Research Programs for Asia by C. Patterson Giersch

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Journal of World History, vol. 26, no. 4 (2015)

Journal of World History volume 26 number 4 is a special issue edited by Gareth Curless, Stacey Hynd, Temilola Alanamu, and Katherine Roscoe. Titled “The British World as World History: Networks in Imperial and Global History,” this dedicated issue features imperial historians inspired by the “cultural turn” and the rise of global history. Instead of accounts that focus on a metropolitan center and a colonial periphery, scholars now advocate

a decentered approach to the study of empire, which emphasizes the importance of paying close attention to the multiple networks of capital, goods, information, and people that existed within and between empires. While these networked treatments of empire have added much to our understanding of imperialism, the articles in this special issue argue that historians must remain sensitive to the specifics of the imperial experience, the limits of imperialism’s global reach, and the way in which imperialism could lead to new forms of exclusion and inequality.

Articles in the special issue include:

  • The Establishment of the Tongwen Guan and the Fragile Sin-British Peace of the 1860s, by Melissa Mouat
  • “Home Allies”: Female Networks, Tensions, and Conflicted Loyalties in India and Van Diemen’s Land, 1826-1849, by Felicity Berry
  • Settler Historicism and Anticolonial Rebuttal in the British World, 1880-1920, by Andam Behm
  • The “Truth” about Kenya: Connection and Contestation in the 1956 Kamiti Controversy, by Katherine Bruce-Lockhart
  • “Tropical Allsorts”: The Transnational Flavor of British Development Policies in Africa, by Charlotte Lynia Riley
  • Functions and Failures of Transnational Activism: Discourses of Children’s Resistance and Repression in Global Anti-Apartheid Networks, by Emily Bridger
  • Book reviews

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Cross-Currents, vol. 5, no. 1 (2016)

01_CC 5-1 Greene_Page_15_Image_0001

Tiles from the proposed version of reformed mahjong mentioned in “The Game People Played” by Maggie Greene in this issue. From the right, tiles include government types, classes of citizens, countries, continents, oceans, and technology.

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review volume 5, number 1 is now available and features the following articles:

  • The Game People Played: Mahjong in Modern Chinese Society and Culture by Maggie Greene
  • The Afterlives of An Chunggŭn in Republican China: From Sinocentric Appropriation to a Rupture in Nationalism by Inhye Han
  • Against the Nihilism of Suffering and Death: Richard E.K. Kim and His Works by Jooyeon Rhee
  • Street Theater and Subject Formation in Wartime China: Toward a New Form of Public Art by Xiaobing Tang
  • Domesticating Hybridity: Straits Chinese Cultural Heritage Projects in Malaysia and Singapore by Karen M. Teoh
  • A Russian Radical and East Asia in the Early Twentieth Century: Sudzilovsky, China, and Japan by Vladimir Tikhonov (Pak Noja)
  • Imagining Urban Community: Contested Geographies and Parallax Urban Dreams on Cheju Island, South Korea by Tommy Tran

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