Tag Archives: Hawaii

The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 29 no. 2 (2017)

Featured art in the new issue of The Contemporary Pacific by Selwyn Muru: On 9 June 2017, 135 years after government troops invaded and violently decimated the Māori settlement of Parihaka (and at the time this issue of the journal was about to go to press), a Crown apology was finally offered to the people of Parihaka. The gesture is more than symbolic: an additional deed of reconciliation, legacy statement, ongoing relationship agreements with local and national government, a development fund, and legislation are being put in place to ensure that the Crown’s commitment is legally binding. Parihaka Papakainga Trust Chair Puna Wano-Bryant’s declaration of a “new dawn” echoed sentiments expressed at the time of Parihaka’s founding. The cover image depicts two important prophets, peacemakers, and leaders of nonviolent resistance in this story: Te Whiti o Rongomai, who helped establish Parihaka with Tohu Kakahi, and their colleague Riwha Titokowaru, who was blind in one eye, and who was arguably “the best general New Zealand has ever produced” (James Belich, in Te Ara: The Encyclopedia of New Zealand).

This issue of The Contemporary Pacific features a dialogue, “Losing Oceania to the Pacific and the World,” political reviews, the work of artist Selwyn Muru, book and media reviews, and the following articles:

  • Climate Change and the Imagining of Migration: Emerging Discourses on Kiribati’s Land Purchase in Fiji by Elfriede Hermann and Wolfgang Kempf
  • Charting Pacific (Studies) Waters: Evidence of Teaching and Learning by Teresia K. Teaiwa

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Pacific Science, vol. 71, no. 3 (July 2017)

From Demography of Marine Turtles in the Nearshore Environments of the Northern Mariana Islands, an open access article in this issue. Clockwise from bottom left: nearshore capture locations in relation to benthic habitat of ( A) Saipan, (B) Tinian, and (C ) Rota, and (D) an image of the free diver hand capturing a juvenile green turtle. Green and orange dots depict capture locations for green and hawksbill turtles, respectively. Shading indicates benthic habitat.

 

This quarter’s issue of Pacific Science includes Demography of Marine Turtles in the Nearshore Environments of the Northern Mariana Islands, an open-access article; and an online-only supplemental for Methods for Measuring Bird-Mediated Seed Rain: Insights from a Hawaiian Mesic Forest.

The open-access article examines honu:

In the western Pacific, green (Chelonia mydas) and hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata) sea turtles are listed as Endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). Population data are limited for both species throughout the entire region and particularly in the Philippine Sea. This study characterizes size class distribution, growth rates, habitat use, behavior, diet, and site fidelity of foraging aggregations of green and hawksbill turtles in nearshore habitats of Saipan, Tinian, and Rota in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI ). Between August 2006 and February 2014, we captured 642 turtles (493 green and 36 hawksbill turtles). … This is the first study within the CNMI to report on morphometric data and diet composition of marine turtles. These results provide an assessment of green and hawksbill turtle population demographics and habitat use in the CNMI.

Scholarly articles in this issue:

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Pacific Science, vol. 71, no. 2 (2017)

Adult specimens of Eriocheir ogasawaraensis, endemic to the Ogasawara Islands, collected in March, 2004, in Chichi-jima, Ogasawara, Japan, in dorsal view: female, 82 mm in carapace width (upper), male, 81 mm in carapace width (lower). Kobayashi and Satake in this issue compare the morphology of this endemic crab to that of its ontinental congener, the Japanese mitten crab, Eriocheir japonica, finding differences in sexual dimorphism. Photo: Satoshi Kobayashi.

This quarterly issue of Pacific Science explores new research about Pacific crabs, fish, plankton, birds, grass, frogs, and eels.

The opening article examines fish in the aftermath of the 2011 Tohoku 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. From the abstract:

Thirteen commonly consumed types of fish caught in the North Pacific and locally available in Hawai‘i were analyzed using gamma spectroscopy to measure Fukushima-derived and historic 134Cs and 137Cs isotopes. All fish samples had detectable 137Cs above 95% confidence intervals. Three out of the thirteen samples had 134Cs, an isotope indicative of Fukushima releases, detected above 95% confidence intervals. The highest 134Cs and 137Cs concentration in the examined species was in ‘ahi tuna, carrying 0.10 ± 0.04 Bq/ kg and 0.62 ± 0.05 Bq/ kg, respectively. Other samples with 134Cs activities found above their 2-sigma uncertainty were albacore tuna and swordfish. Historic and Fukushima-derived contributions were evaluated, and in several samples the Fukushima-derived radiocesium dominated the total radiocesium inventory with up to 61% contribution. All activities were below derived intervention limits of 1,200 Bq/ kg, and the doses to humans from consuming the fish attributable to radiocesium were 0.02 – 0.2 μ Sv, in comparison to 6 – 20 μ Sv contributed by the natural 40K present in the same fish.

Scholarly articles in this issue:

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Palapala: a journal for Hawaiian language and literature – Volume 1, Issue 1 (2017)

PalapalaThe University of Hawai‘i Press is proud to publish a new, open-access resource for Hawaiian scholars, Palapala: a journal for Hawaiian language and literatureIt is the first peer-reviewed Hawaiian language journal to be published exclusively online.

The entirety of Palapala volume 1, issue 1, which includes contemporary research in both Hawaiian and English, is available for free through UH library’s ScholarSpace:

No Palapala / About Palapala

  • Editors’ introduction (Keola Donaghy, ku‘ualoha ho‘omanawanui, Kapali Lyon, ‘Ōiwi Parker Jones, Hiapokeikikāne K. Perreira)

Nā ‘Atikala Noi‘i Hou / New Research

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The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 29 no. 1 (2017)

From artist Lisa Reihana featured in this issue. Dandy, 2007. Countering stereotypical depictions of Māori masculinity, strength, and prowess that focus on physical accomplishments on the battlefield or rugby playgrounds, Reihana’s Dandy, with full-face moko (tattoo) and Victorian attire, asserts a quietly confident sense of elegance and poise.

This issue of The Contemporary Pacific features a look at public murals in a Kanaka Maoli context, political reviews, the work of artist Lisa Reihana, book and media reviews, and the following articles:

  • Walls of Empowerment: Reading Public Murals in a Kanaka Maoli Context by A Mārata Ketekiri Tamaira
  • Traveling Houses: Preforming Diasporic Relationships in Europe by A-Chr (Tina) Engels-Schwarzpaul
  • CEDAW Smokescreens: Gender Politics in Contemporary Tonga by Helen Lee

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Pacific Science, vol. 71, no. 1 (2017)

From ‘Range Expansion of the Small Carpenter Bee Ceratina smaragdula across the Hawaiian Archipelago with Potential Ecological Implications for Native Pollinator Systems’ in this issue. Female (left) and male (right) Ceratina (Pithitis) smaragdula: face, a, b; dorsal view, c, d; lateral view, e, f. Body length is between 6 and 8 mm on average. Note relatively prominent facial maculation and black abdominal patches of the male.

Preview Pacific Science, vol. 71 no. 1 with the following article free for all from Bio-One:

New Species of Stylasterid (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa: Anthoathecata: Stylasteridae) from the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands by Stephen D. Cairns

Also inside this quarter’s issue, Wyatt A. Shell examines small green carpenter bee range expansion in Hawai’i:

Invasive bee species may have a widely detrimental impact on their novel host ecosystem. Introduced bees can rapidly disrupt native plantpollinator mutualisms through competition with indigenous pollinator fauna and facilitation of invasive flora reproduction. […] Here we present a comprehensive synthesis of C. smaragdula’s known biological and ecological history, as well as a population genetic analysis of C. smaragdula from Maui, and from locations across its native range, at the cytochrome oxidase I (COI ) locus. We update C. smaragdula’s known distribution and occurrence elevation in Hawai‘i and reveal a lack of genetic structure between Hawaiian and native range populations.

Scholarly articles in this issue:

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Curve of the Hook: An Archaeologist in Polynesia (MANOA 28-1)

This issue of MĀNOA (28-1), Curve of the Hook: An Archaeologist in Polynesia is a booklength interview with Dr. Yosihiko Sinoto, known for the astonishing archaeological discoveries that changed our ideas of the ancient Polynesians, their ways of life, and their legendary voyages across the Pacific. Dr. Sinoto’s discoveries included whale-tooth pendants, stone tools and weapons, sacred structures, dwellings, an ancient voyaging canoe, and finely made fishhooks that allowed him and his fellow archaeologists to chart the seafaring routes of early Polynesians.

Now, in Curve of the Hook, we can experience the extraordinary adventures and career of an eminent and celebrated archaeologist in Polynesia. This full-color book includes over 100 illustrations—including unpublished photos from Dr. Sinoto’s private collection—plus notes and a list of references.

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