Tag Archives: Japan

Pacific Science, vol. 72, no. 2 (April 2018)

Picture of a feral pig on Hawai'i Island

Lactating feral pig, Sus scrofa, on Hawai‘i Island from “Biology and Impacts of Pacific Islands Invasive Species. 14. Sus scrofa, the Feral Pig (Artiodactyla: Suidae)” in this issue. (Photo: U.S. Geological Survey.)

The second issue in volume 72 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, includes the 14th article in the “Biology and Impacts of Pacific Islands Invasive Species” series, plus seven more research articles.

Preview volume 72, number 2 below and find a list of all articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

Contents

…plus Association Affairs from the PSA.


Find the full text of the issue at BioOne


Browse the TOC and read full text online at Project MUSE


Cover of Pacific Science volume 72, number 2 (April 2018)

Pacific Science volume 72, number 2 (April 2018)

About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

Journal of World History, vol. 29, no. 1 (March 2018)

Journal of World History volume 29, number 1 arrives with three articles covering Brazil, China, and India:

Articles

  • The British Empire and the Suppression of the Slave Trade to Brazil: A Global History Analysis by Tâmis Parron

    • Abstract: This essay examines the connections between the British free trade experiment, the reorganizing of the British Empire and the ultimate suppression of the transatlantic slave trade to Brazil in its fully global operative context. While most analyses of the nineteenth-century transatlantic slave trade focus on bilateral diplomatic relations or national decision-making processes, this essay puts forth a broader analytical framework. It places the end of the transatlantic illegal slave trade to Brazil in 1850 within the dynamics of the world-economy. In a broader sense, this essay sheds new light on debates about capitalism and slavery as it reveals nineteenth-century capitalism not as a static background for historical analysis, but rather as a dialectical process moving through a sequence of disruptive commodity market integrations, each of which posed specific economic and political challenges for slaveholders and antislavery actors alike.
  • The Rise of Nationalism in a Cosmopolitan Port City: The Foreign Communities of Shanghai during the First World War by Tobit Vandamme

    • Abstract: By the early 1900s, globalization and imperialism had created cosmopolitan cities such as the Chinese treaty port of Shanghai, where foreign minorities lived side by side. The outbreak of the First World War put enormous pressure on these multiethnic urban societies. By exploring how the war altered the cohabitation of Westerners in Shanghai, this article connects with current debates on the mechanisms of longdistance nationalism and cosmopolitanism as well as on the importation of conflict in diaspora communities. The many imperial diasporas of Shanghai mostly lived in the French- and British-controlled territories, where the balance of power was renegotiated during the war. Analyzing local community newspapers and diplomatic archives, this article explains why nationalism superseded the shared feeling of cosmopolitanism that prevailed before the war. The cosmopolitan tradition and political complexity clearly delayed the arrival of the war at Shanghai, but could not prevent the process.
  • Present at the Creation: India, the Global Economy, and the Bretton Woods Conference by Aditya Balasubramanian and Srinath Raghavan

    • Abstract: This article considers India’s participation in the Bretton Woods conference, where the framework for the post-World War II global economic order emerged. Building on the new historiography of Bretton Woods as well as a more specialized literature on the Indian economy, it shows India’s role in Bretton Woods at the confluence of national, imperial, and global historical processes. The article argues that India’s presence in the conference shaped the evolution of the country’s relationship to international economic institutions. The article addresses India’s changing role in the British Empire and world economy, the evolution of a discourse of Indian economic development alongside anti-colonial nationalism, the formulation of Indian objectives for the conference in the aftermath of the economic dislocations of World War II, and the interpretation of the outcomes of the meeting at home that informed India’s subsequent ambiguous relationship with international economic organizations.

Plus 15 book reviews and books received.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


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00_29.1coverAbout the Journal

The Journal of World History publishes research into historical questions requiring the investigation of evidence on a global, comparative, cross-cultural, or transnational scale. It is devoted to the study of phenomena that transcend the boundaries of single states, regions, or cultures, such as large-scale population movements, long-distance trade, cross-cultural technology transfers, and the transnational spread of ideas.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the World History Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

The Journal of World History is proud to introduce a new article and peer review submission system, accessible now at at jwh.msubmit.net.

Journal of World History, vol. 28, nos. 3 & 4 (2017)

Excerpt from La Vie Indo-Chinoise

Japanese sex workers occupied a special place in the desires and fantasies of French colonial men in Asia as seen in ‘Our Hungarians,’ La Vie Indo-Chinoise, November 13, 1897. From “Sex and the Colonial City” in this issue.

Journal of World History volume 28, numbers 3&4 is a special double issue guest edited by Tracey Rizzo on Gender and Empire. It includes more than 400 pages of articles and book reviews from world history scholars.

From the Editor’s Introduction:

Gender and Empire as a subfield of world history goes beyond the study of the men and women who made and unmade empires. Intimacies generated ties that facilitated or impeded the modernization of family and nation, demarcating contact zones. Bodies–adorned, fetishized, public–displayed and negotiated imperial relations. Detritus, the material remains of empire and intimacy, lodged itself in the institutions and discourses of modernity. When world historians talk across boundaries and borders, we situate disjointed ruins in broader trends and patterns, without which they are mere curiosities. Assembled here: a Chinese scalp; a silver buckle from Malaya; a bawdy cartoon from Hanoi; a hybrid recipe from Nigeria; dossiers from Lebanon and El Salvador; government orders promoting or suppressing prostitution… Confined to a national or even imperial history, such fragments do not tell us anything about coloniality. Here they do.

Articles

Plus five more articles, 13 book reviews, books received, and the volume index.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


JWH28_3-4_cover1About the Journal

The Journal of World History publishes research into historical questions requiring the investigation of evidence on a global, comparative, cross-cultural, or transnational scale. It is devoted to the study of phenomena that transcend the boundaries of single states, regions, or cultures, such as large-scale population movements, long-distance trade, cross-cultural technology transfers, and the transnational spread of ideas.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the World History Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

The Journal of World History is proud to introduce a new article and peer review submission system, accessible now at at jwh.msubmit.net.

Pacific Science, vol. 72, no. 1 (January 2018)

A blue shark

A blue shark (Prionace glauca) caught by a Japanese research vessel in the western North Pacific Ocean. Fujinami et al. (this issue) analyzed feeding habits of blue sharks in the Northwestern Pacific. Photo credit: Akira Kurashima, National Research Institute of Far Seas Fisheries.

Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, begins 2018 with new research on sharks, dolphins, cats, and more biological and physical studies. Preview volume 72, number 1 below and find a list of all articles available on Bio-One and Project MUSE.

Contents

  • Loss of Reservoir Capacity through Sedimentation in Hawai‘i: Management Implications for the Twenty-First Century by Kim Falinski and David Pen

  • Feeding Habits of the Blue Shark (Prionace glauca) in the Northwestern Pacific Based on Stomach Contents and Stable Isotope Ratios by Yuki Fujinami, Sayaka Nakatsuka, and Seiji Ohshimo

  • Presence, Behavior, and Resighting Pattern of Transient Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in the Humboldt Current System off North-Central Chile by Macarena Santos-Carvallo, Maritza Sepúlveda, Rodrigo Moraga, Mauricio F. Landaeta, Doris Oliva, and María José Pérez-Alvarez

  • Modeling Impacts of Hunting on Control of an Insular Feral Cat Population by Brian T. Leo, James J. Anderson, James Ha, Reese B. Phillips, and Renee R. Ha

  • Resource Availability, Propagule Supply, and Effect of Nonnative Ungulate Herbivores on Senecio madagascariensis Invasion by Erin J. Questad, Amanda Uowolo, Sam Brooks, Robert Fitch, and Susan Cordell

…plus more articles and Association Affairs from the PSA.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


Pacific Science 72:1

Pacific Science vol. 72, no. 1 (January 2018)

About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

Mountain/Home: New Translations from Japan (MĀNOA 29:2)

"Mount Fuji in the Spring." Norikane Hiroto. Etching, 1997.

“Mount Fuji in the Spring.” Norikane Hiroto. Etching, 1997. Gift of Philip H. Roach Jr., 2010 (31780). Courtesy of Honolulu Museum of Art.

The new issue of MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, volume 29 number 2, is a collection of Japanese literature in translation edited by Leza Lowitz and Frank Stewart.

From the editors:

Mountain/Home presents new translations of selected Japanese works from the medieval period to the present. The volume opens with traditional folktales, court poetry, Edo Period poetry, and contemporary fiction—all from “One Hundred Literary Views of Mount Fuji,” a collection of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction related to Japan’s national symbol. The works reveal how Japanese attitudes toward Mount Fuji have changed over time, particularly after the country was opened to the West in the nineteenth century.

Table of Contents

One Hundred Literary Views of Mount Fuji: Mount Fuji has been celebrated by poets, novelists, and playwrights for almost 1,500 years, from Japan’s earliest literary works to the present. Peter MacMillan provides these translations and introductions.

  • The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter: Taketori Monogataria tenth-century tale, recounts the origin of Mount Fuji’s name and is one of the earliest examples of Japanese literary fiction.
  • Love Song and Reply: These poems are from the Gosen Wakashū, a major tenth-century anthology of Japanese poetry. Many of the waka in the collection are “dialogue poems,” written in pairs by men and women of the court, speaking the cloaked language of secret love affairs, seductions, and laments.
  • from The Confessions of Lady Nijo: Lost for over six hundred years, Lady Nijo’s manuscript was discovered by a Japanese scholar in the Imperial Library in 1940.
  • A Tale of a Mount Fuji Cave: This story from the Kamakura Period tells of a journey to the mouth of hell and back.
  • Two Haiku by Matsuo Bashō: His poetry broke from the decadent style of the time, finding instead a resonance with nature, simplicity, spontaneity, and originality.
  • Sanshirō: In this excerpt from Natsume Soseki’s 1908 coming-of-age novel, the protagonist, Ogawa Sanshiro, is twenty-three years old.

Continue reading

Cross-Currents, vol. 6, no. 2 (November 2017)

Mandala scroll

Mandala of the Two Worlds (Ryōkai mandara), one of two hanging scrolls, Edo period (1693). Ink and colors on silk, 410.9 x 378.4 cm (each). Tōji Temple, Kyoto. Source: Sawa and Hamada (1983–1984, 24, 29). From “Sankei Mandara: Layered Maps to Sacred Places,” in this issue.

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review vol. 6, no. 2 opens with a section on cartography, echoing a theme published in vol. 6, no. 1 earlier this year. 

Maps and Their Contexts: Reflections on Cartography and Culture in Premodern East Asia

Continue reading

Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 28 (2016)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

From The City of the Future (1960) in this issue. Kikutake Kiyonori, Marine City, 1971. Drawing with felt-tip pen, 64 cm x 64 cm. Photo by Jean-Claude Planchet. Musee National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris France. © CNAC/MNAM/Dist.RMN-Grand Palais/Art Resource, NY. Courtesy of Kikutake Architects.

The Review of Japanese Culture and Society, volume 28 opens with an editors’ introduction:

…“Japanese design” possesses one of the most recognizable profiles, albeit one with multiple personalities. Notions of minimalism, Zen, wabi-sabi, and cute are often ascribed as inherent attributes of Japanese design. This profile operates  across media and disciplines, from graphic design to architecture and interiors, product and furniture design, and fashion and newer industries like interaction or experience design. On the one hand, we hear of “Zen minimalism” associated with architecture, interiors, and the simple lines and matte surfaces of sophisticated product design, and on the other hand, a sort of frenetic hyper-cute sensibility associated with youth culture and digital design.
Design and Society in Modern Japan: An Introduction, by Ignacio Adriasola, Sarah Teasley, and Jilly Traganou

DESIGN AND SOCIETY IN MODERN JAPAN

Japan’s Industrial Arts: Present and Future (1917) (translated by Penny Bailey)
by Yasuda Rokuzō

Industrial Arts and the Development of Japan’s Industry (1932) (translated by Penny Bailey)
by Kunii Kitarō Continue reading