Tag Archives: Japanese

Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 28 (2016)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

From The City of the Future (1960) in this issue. Kikutake Kiyonori, Marine City, 1971. Drawing with felt-tip pen, 64 cm x 64 cm. Photo by Jean-Claude Planchet. Musee National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris France. © CNAC/MNAM/Dist.RMN-Grand Palais/Art Resource, NY. Courtesy of Kikutake Architects.

The Review of Japanese Culture and Society, volume 28 opens with an editors’ introduction:

…“Japanese design” possesses one of the most recognizable profiles, albeit one with multiple personalities. Notions of minimalism, Zen, wabi-sabi, and cute are often ascribed as inherent attributes of Japanese design. This profile operates  across media and disciplines, from graphic design to architecture and interiors, product and furniture design, and fashion and newer industries like interaction or experience design. On the one hand, we hear of “Zen minimalism” associated with architecture, interiors, and the simple lines and matte surfaces of sophisticated product design, and on the other hand, a sort of frenetic hyper-cute sensibility associated with youth culture and digital design.
Design and Society in Modern Japan: An Introduction, by Ignacio Adriasola, Sarah Teasley, and Jilly Traganou

DESIGN AND SOCIETY IN MODERN JAPAN

Japan’s Industrial Arts: Present and Future (1917) (translated by Penny Bailey)
by Yasuda Rokuzō

Industrial Arts and the Development of Japan’s Industry (1932) (translated by Penny Bailey)
by Kunii Kitarō Continue reading

Advertisements

U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal, no. 51 (2017)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

The U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal number 51 is a special issue commemorating the journal’s 50 previous issues.

We are honored to publish the fifty-first issue of the U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal (USJWJ)—complete with special features to commemorate the previous fifty issues—and to launch a new phase in our history. Founded in 1988, USJWJ is the world’s oldest scholarly journal devoted to the study of gender and Japan. We are a peer-reviewed, biannual publication, available in print and online, that promotes scholarly exchange on social, cultural, political, and economic issues. We encourage comparative study among Japan, the United States, and other countries, and feature articles about women’s lived experiences and media representations. Our mission is to foster the work of young researchers and to ensure that the achievements of established scholars are not forgotten.
— Alisa Freedman,
Editor’s Note [Free to Access on MUSE]

It features the following scholarly works including:

  • Building a Feminist Scholarly Community: Fifty-One Issues of U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal [Free to Access on MUSE]
    by Jan Bardsley
  • The Benefits and Lessons of Two Decades with U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal
    by Sally A. Hastings
  • Maiden Martyr for “New Japan”: The 1960 Ampo and the Rhetoric of the Other Michiko
    by Hiroko Hirakawa
  • Image-Makers and Victims: The Croissant Syndrome and Yellow Cabs
    by Aki Hirota
  • Nagai Michiko and Ariyoshi Sawako Rewrite the Taikō
    by Susan Westhafer Furukawa
  • Right Here, Right Here
    by Shibasaki Tomoka
  • Shibasaki Tomoka’s Literature of Location
    by Kendall Heitzman
  • Heisei Murasaki: What Women Poets Have Found during Japan’s Lost Decades
    by Jordan A. Y. Smith

Continue reading

U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal, no. 50 (2016)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

The U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal number 50 features the following scholarly works including:

  • Cold War Manifest Domesticity: The “Kitchen Debate” and Single American Occupationnaire Women in the U.S. Occupation of Japan, 1945-1952
    by Michiko Takeuchi
  • How to Be a Domestic Goddess: Female Film Stars and the Housewife Role in Postwar Japan
    by Jennifer Coates
  • A Friend in Need: Esther B. Rhoads, Quakers, and Humanitarian Relief in Allied Occupied Japan, 1946–52
    by Marlene J. Mayo
  • For the Purity of the Nation: Ogawa Masako and the  Gendered Ethics of Spring on the Small Island (Kojima no haru)
    by Kathryn M. Tanaka
  • Tenkin, New Marital Relationships, and Women’s Challenges in Employment and Family
    by Noriko Fujita

Continue reading

U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal, no. 49 (2016)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

The U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal number 49 features the following scholarly works:

  • Will Japan “Lean In” to Gender Equality?
    Liv Coleman, 3
  • From the Margins of Meiji Society: Space and Gender in Higuchi Ichiyō’s “Troubled Waters”
    Mayumi Manabe, 26
  • Topographies of Intimacy: Sex and Shibuya in Hasegawa Junko’s Prisoner of Solitude
    David Holloway, 51
  • Historical Allegories in Ogawa Yōko’s 2006 Mīna no kōshin
    Eve Zimmerman, 68

Continue reading

U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal, no. 48 (2015)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

The U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal number 48 features the following scholarly works:

  • Women Educating Women: Class, Feminism, and Formal Education in the Proletarian Writing of Hirabayashi Taiko and Kang Kyŏng-ae
    Elizabeth Grace, 3
  • From Muse to Dandy to Guerrilla: Takeda Yuriko’s Photographic Eye
    Atsuko Sakaki, 33
  • Authenticity in Japanese Cell Phone Novel Discourse
    Kelly Hansen, 60
  • Gender Gaiatsu: An Institutional Perspective on Womenomics
    Linda C. Hasunuma, 79

Continue reading

Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 27 (2015)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

SPECIAL JOURNAL ISSUE IN HONOR OF KYOKO SELDEN

The Review of Japanese Culture and Society, volume 27 is a special issue to honor the memory and contributions of Kyoko Selden.

Flute Boy, watercolor by Kyoko Selden.
From the family’s personal collection.

This special issue edited by Alisa Freedman includes many of Kyoko Selden’s finest translations, including some not previously published. They reveal the range and depth of Kyoko’s interests and knowledge. Her interpretations of modern literature, of writings about the atomic bomb, and of fiction and poetry by women writers, are well known—but her translations of the fourteenth-century Taiheiki: The Chronicle of Great Peace and the Tokugawa era Hinin Taiheiki: The Paupers’ Chronicle of Peace, published for the first time in this issue, reveal her sure grasp of the classical canon as well. The power of Kyoko’s translation work, her ability to bring a new text into being, and the subtle creativity of her expression, are hallmarks of her achievements.

1 In Remembrance of Kyoko Selden
Mizuta Noriko, 1

2 Remembering Kyoko Selden
Brett de Bary, 3

3 Introduction to the Special Issue in Honor of Kyoko Selden
Alisa Freedman, 6

Continue reading