Tag Archives: Korean Literature

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture, vol. 11 (2018)

Lim Ok-sang’s Landscape II, 1976, Ink and oil on rice paper, 64 × 128 cm, featured in this issue of Azalea.

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture volume 11 opens with the following note from editor Young-Jun Lee:

The Korean peninsula is now in the midst of a series of remarkable and dramatic changes. People the world over are surprised, curious, and relieved, especially those who feared imminent war on the peninsula. In addition, the first female president of Korea is now in prison, and her predecessor was also arrested and soon will be tried. The current president, who has a very high approval rating, used the Winter Olympics as a stage for international diplomacy and led North Korea to the bargaining table. We do not know if Kim Jong Un will give up nuclear weapons, or if Trump will sign a peace treaty or pledge economic cooperation, but it is no exaggeration to say that these changes are seismic.

With the news that North Korea was developing nuclear weapons and conducting missile tests, and that evacuation drills were taking place in Japan and Hawaii, people with relatives in Korea would call them, worried about their safety. There was also contrasting news. Some foreign media were surprised to hear that nothing appeared to be happening in Seoul, and its inhabitants were going about their daily lives despite the threat of imminent war. In turbulent times, art enables us to grasp these apparent contradictions and complexities. Art can give us insight into the minds of Koreans who are experiencing and responding to events as they happen. This volume of Azalea presents outstanding work that illuminates the Korean spirit under conditions both ordinary and extraordinary.

Writer in Focus: Cheon Myeong-Gwan

Excerpt from Whale
Cheon Myeong-gwan, Jae Won Chung

Twenty
Cheon Myeong-gwan, Jamie Chang

Excerpt from My Uncle Bruce Lee
Cheon Myeong-gwan, Susanna Lim

Pink
Cheon Myeong-gwan, Jamie Chang

A Conversation with Cheon Myeong-gwan
Jamie Chang

Fiction

A Journal from the Alpha-Omega Kosiwon
Park Min-gyu, Kyung Hyun Kim, Sue Heun Kim

Roadkill
Yun Ko Eun, Lizzie Buehler

Sister Thief
Bae Suah, Janet Hong

Forever a Narrator
Kim Ae-ran, Eungee Sung

Poetry

Poems by Kim Joong-Il, Lee Young-ju, Han Kang, Lee Jangwook, Ha Jaeyoun, and An Heeyeon.

Another Perspective

Raising the Profile of Korean Literature Overseas
Seong-Kon Kim

Special Feature: Yi T’aeujun

Introduction to Yi T’aejun’s Travels in China
Jun Youb Lee

Excerpt from Travels in China: A Great New China
Yi T’aejun, Jun Youb Lee

Images

Images and Image Index


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


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About the Journal

Azalea promotes Korean literature among English-language readers. Azalea introduces to the world new writers as well as promising translators, providing the academic community of Korean studies with well-translated texts for college courses. Writers from around the world also share their experience of Korean literature or culture with wider audiences.

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Subscriptions for both individuals and institutions are available here.

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Early Release Articles: Korean Studies (December 2017)

University of Hawai’i Press and Korean Studies present the following early release articles through a partnership with Project MUSE.

EARLY RELEASE ARTICLE

Young Barbara’s Devotion and Death: Reading Father Ch’oe’s Field Report of 1850 by Deberniere J. Torrey

EARLY RELEASE BOOK REVIEW

Women and Buddhist Philosophy: Engaging Zen Master Kim Iryŏp by Jin Y. Park (University of Hawai`i Press: 2017), reviewed by Jungshim Lee

All Korean Studies early release articles may be viewed online here.

Please note: Early release manuscripts have been through our rigorous peer-review process, accepted for publication, and copyedited. These articles will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal. These articles have not yet been through the full production process and therefore may contain errors. These articles will be removed from the early release page once they are published as part of an issue.

The next complete volume of Korean Studies will appear in 2018. Sign up for new issue email alerts from Project MUSE here.

Early Release Article: Korean Studies (November 2017)

University of Hawai’i Press is proud to present the early release of the following article from Korean Studies through a partnership with Project MUSE.

EARLY RELEASE ARTICLE

Implicit Political and Economic Liberties in the Thought of Tasan Chŏng Yagyong by Yi Jongwoo

Abstract: Two types of implicit liberty were the foremost features of the philosophy produced by Tasan Chŏng Yagyong (1762–1836), a Confucian scholar of the Chosŏn dynasty in Korea. The first was political liberty, which enabled people to select and dismiss their ruler. Tasan’s notion of political liberty included a stern admonition to rulers and local officials, stipulating that if they collected unfair taxes from the people, the people had the right to take necessary actions to survive. The second was economic liberty, which enabled people to relocate to another village for financial reasons in the hamlet- field system. Under the well-field system, rulers distributed their farmland among the people equally for their personal use, and therefore they were not tenant farmers. Economic liberty was implicit and advocated that the people lead lives that were consistent with Confucian moral principles.

Browse all Korean Studies early release articles online here.

Please note: Early release manuscripts have been through our rigorous peer-review process, accepted for publication, and copyedited. These articles will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal. These articles have not yet been through the full production process and therefore may contain errors. These articles will be removed from the early release page once they are published as part of an issue.

Stay tuned for more early release articles from UH Press journals.

Early Release Book Reviews: Korean Studies (September 2017)

University of Hawai’i Press is proud to present the early release of the following book reviews from Korean Studies through a partnership with Project MUSE.

EARLY RELEASE BOOK REVIEWS

Browse all Korean Studies early release articles online here.

Please note: Early release manuscripts have been through our rigorous peer-review process, accepted for publication, and copyedited. These articles will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal. These articles have not yet been through the full production process and therefore may contain errors. These articles will be removed from the early release page once they are published as part of an issue.

Stay tuned for more early release articles from UH Press journals.

Korean Studies, vol. 41 (2017)

Map of Koryŏ dynasty, from Koryŏ: An Introduction in this issue.

This year’s issue of Korean Studies includes a special section focusing on the middle kingdom Koryŏ.

Koryŏ, Korea’s middle kingdom in that it is lodged between Silla and Chosŏn, is the least studied era of Korea’s history. And yet it offers intriguing insights into Korea’s long tradition as the Koryŏ state participated actively in international events while at the same time building internal institutions in response to its own unique experiences. The collection of papers that follows introduces both these international and domestic themes, providing a nuanced understanding of both Koryŏ and Korea.

–Edward J. Shultz, Koryŏ: An Introduction

Special section

Timeline of Koryŏ dynasty in its chronological context from Koryŏ: An Introduction in this issue.

Koryŏ: An Introduction
Edward J. Shultz

Early Koryŏ Political Institutions and the International Expansion of Tang and Song Institutions
Jae Woo Park (Pak Chaeu)

Interstate Relations in East Asia and Medical Exchanges in the Late Eleventh Century and Early Twelfth Century
Oongseok Chai (Ungso˘k Ch’ae)

Koryŏ ’s Trade with the Outer World
Kang Hahn Lee (Yi Kanghan) Continue reading

Interview: Korean Studies Editor Christopher J. Bae

Korean Studies: A Multidisciplinary Journal on Korea and Koreans Abroad celebrates its 25th year in 2017. With that milestone also comes new leadership with editor-in-chief Christopher J. Bae of our very own University of Hawai’i at Mānoa. Read more about his background and goals for the annual publication in our interview below. You may also preview early release articles from the forthcoming volume or browse archives of the journal on Project MUSE.

Christopher J. Bae, an UH Mānoa professor of anthropology and the new editor of Korean Studies, is shown here at an excavation site in Korea.

Tell us a bit about yourself and your new role as editor of Korean Studies.

I am a full professor in the UH Mānoa Department of Anthropology, and I specialize in the field of Asian paleoanthropology (human evolutionary studies.) I particularly focus on early human sites and materials in Korea, China, and Japan, and have recently started to investigate setting up similar research projects in Southeast Asia. So the connection for me with Korean Studies is that one of my core areas of focus is Korea, as I have worked there for the past quarter century collaborating on a diversity of projects related primarily to Korean prehistory.

The invitation to take over the editorship of the journal actually came as a surprise to me as the previous editor(s) have been doing a fine job managing the journal. That being said, I was honored to be invited to take on the role of editor of the journal as it is one of the oldest and most prestigious Korean studies focused journals outside of Korea.

How has Korean Studies evolved over the years?

Korean Studies was started by the Center for Korean Studies at UH Mānoa in 1977. It is a journal that is published annually and we will publish our forty-first volume this year. The main goal of the journal has always been to publish original research on Korean studies from humanities and social science perspectives. That goal has not changed since its inception. One minor change perhaps may be that we have become more open to publishing conference proceedings in the journal. For instance, in Vol. 37 (2013), we included a special section titled “Urban Cultural Landscapes of Colonial Korea, 1920s-1930s” that featured papers from a two-day conference held at the Center for Korean Studies at UH Mānoa in February 2012.

Have you learned anything interesting from your first months as editor?

Probably the most interesting aspect that I have learned since taking over the editorship is how broad Korean studies really is. I personally am learning a great deal about the different fields and how they contribute to the broader picture of Korean studies generally. Korean Studies is serving to broaden my own horizons in this area and from that perspective I really enjoy serving in this role.

In your field, what issues are particularly relevant right now? 

North Korean politics is probably one of the hottest topics within Korean studies right now. As such, one of the first decisions I made after taking over the editorship was to invite Victor D. Cha, currently one of the most prominent U.S.-based specialists on North Korea, to contribute an article to Korean Studies. Cha’s piece “Informal Empire: The Origins of the U.S.–ROK Alliance and the 1953 Mutual Defense Treaty Negotiations” will appear in Vol. 41. I anticipate Cha’s paper should be well-received and well-cited.

Do you have any advice for academics interested in submitting to your journal?

We are open to submissions on any topic related to Korean studies. But if an author is not sure whether his/her manuscript may be suitable for our journal, they should contact the editor directly.

We have new Author Guidelines posted online (click here). It would help any potential authors to make sure their manuscripts follow the Author Guidelines closely before submitting their manuscripts.

What’s next for Korean Studies?

Since taking over the journal, I have started to make a number of changes. In particular, the journal now has formal Author Guidelines and a “News and Comments” section where authors may comment on previously-published works either in our journal or elsewhere. We are also moving to an online submission system, which should be up and running by the end of the year, if not sooner.

Because Korean Studies is such a broad area journal we will continue to be open to publishing manuscripts from various disciplines that cover Korean studies. But one area I see us publishing more on moving forward is the growing area of Korean-American or simply “Koreans abroad” types of research. For instance, studies on Korean immigrant history to places like the Americas, Europe, or Australia/New Zealand are particularly interesting. “Race” relations and how Koreans have assimilated/acclimated to new environments are also highly pertinent, especially given that this year marks the 25th anniversary of the famous Rodney King Riots in Los Angeles, California.


Korean Studies Vol 40 cover

About the Journal

Korean Studies, edited at the University of Hawai‘i Center for Korean Studies, seeks to further scholarship on Korea by providing a forum for discourse on timely subjects, and addresses a variety of scholarly topics through interdisciplinary and multicultural articles, book reviews, and essays in the humanities and social sciences. All scholarly articles on Korea and the Korean community abroad are welcomed, including topics of interest to the specialist and nonspecialist alike.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture, vol. 10 (2017)

az image 10

Candle Light Protest, 12 November 2016, Gwanghwamun Square, Seoul. Images From Chung Taek Yong in this issue of Azalea.

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture volume 10 features the following writings, poetry, and artwork:

CONTENTS:

David R. McCann
Editor’s Note

I am bringing ten years’ association with AZALEA journal to an end with this essay, this issue. I am so very grateful to Young-Jun Lee, whose creation the journal was, is, and will always be, and also
to the translators, authors, and literary scholars in Korea, North
America, and around the globe who have contributed their work
to this effort. For Harvard University’s Korea Institute, which has
provided staff, office space, storage closets and shelves, and above all
a spirit of dedication to the field, my gratitude is immense. Finally,
my thanks to the International Communications Foundation of
Seoul, which has provided both financial support over the years and
encouragement for the effort here and in meetings in Korea on the
subject and the project.

Writer in Focus: Kim Sagwa

Bruce Futlon
Introduction

Kim Sagwa
Chunhŭi

Strange and Ominous Presentiments

P’ul Recumbent

Speaking of Disdain
Continue reading