Tag Archives: Korean Studies

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture, vol. 11 (2018)

Lim Ok-sang’s Landscape II, 1976, Ink and oil on rice paper, 64 × 128 cm, featured in this issue of Azalea.

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture volume 11 opens with the following note from editor Young-Jun Lee:

The Korean peninsula is now in the midst of a series of remarkable and dramatic changes. People the world over are surprised, curious, and relieved, especially those who feared imminent war on the peninsula. In addition, the first female president of Korea is now in prison, and her predecessor was also arrested and soon will be tried. The current president, who has a very high approval rating, used the Winter Olympics as a stage for international diplomacy and led North Korea to the bargaining table. We do not know if Kim Jong Un will give up nuclear weapons, or if Trump will sign a peace treaty or pledge economic cooperation, but it is no exaggeration to say that these changes are seismic.

With the news that North Korea was developing nuclear weapons and conducting missile tests, and that evacuation drills were taking place in Japan and Hawaii, people with relatives in Korea would call them, worried about their safety. There was also contrasting news. Some foreign media were surprised to hear that nothing appeared to be happening in Seoul, and its inhabitants were going about their daily lives despite the threat of imminent war. In turbulent times, art enables us to grasp these apparent contradictions and complexities. Art can give us insight into the minds of Koreans who are experiencing and responding to events as they happen. This volume of Azalea presents outstanding work that illuminates the Korean spirit under conditions both ordinary and extraordinary.

Writer in Focus: Cheon Myeong-Gwan

Excerpt from Whale
Cheon Myeong-gwan, Jae Won Chung

Twenty
Cheon Myeong-gwan, Jamie Chang

Excerpt from My Uncle Bruce Lee
Cheon Myeong-gwan, Susanna Lim

Pink
Cheon Myeong-gwan, Jamie Chang

A Conversation with Cheon Myeong-gwan
Jamie Chang

Fiction

A Journal from the Alpha-Omega Kosiwon
Park Min-gyu, Kyung Hyun Kim, Sue Heun Kim

Roadkill
Yun Ko Eun, Lizzie Buehler

Sister Thief
Bae Suah, Janet Hong

Forever a Narrator
Kim Ae-ran, Eungee Sung

Poetry

Poems by Kim Joong-Il, Lee Young-ju, Han Kang, Lee Jangwook, Ha Jaeyoun, and An Heeyeon.

Another Perspective

Raising the Profile of Korean Literature Overseas
Seong-Kon Kim

Special Feature: Yi T’aeujun

Introduction to Yi T’aejun’s Travels in China
Jun Youb Lee

Excerpt from Travels in China: A Great New China
Yi T’aejun, Jun Youb Lee

Images

Images and Image Index


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About the Journal

Azalea promotes Korean literature among English-language readers. Azalea introduces to the world new writers as well as promising translators, providing the academic community of Korean studies with well-translated texts for college courses. Writers from around the world also share their experience of Korean literature or culture with wider audiences.

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Korean Studies, Volume 42, (2018)

Identities Surrounding a Cenotaph for Korean Atomic Bomb Victims
by Yuko Takahashi

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The Cenotaph for Korean Atomic Bomb Victims. Clockwise from top left: the front, back, right, and left sides. (Photos taken by author.)

In 1970, the Cenotaph for Korean Atomic Bomb Victims was erected in Hiroshima by local Koreans, most of whom were associated with South Korea. In the 1980s, this cenotaph gradually came to be seen as discriminatory against Koreans due to its location outside the Peace Memorial Park. In the 1990s, Hiroshima City and the two major organizations of Japanese-resident Koreans (zainichi Koreans), pro-South Korean Mindan and pro-North Korean Sōren, began negotiations to create a “unified” cenotaph that would be moved inside the Park. However, discussions reached a deadlock due to the rivalry between Mindan and Sōren, and also an internal split that occurred within Mindan. This paper will examine why the debate on the relocation of the cenotaph reached a deadlock in the 1990s, with a focus on the identity of zainichi Koreans. While Mindan and Sōren have their own collective identities, each individual zainichi Korean may identify oneself on various levels, from social to personal. An individual’s social identity develops through belonging to and participating in activities of social organizations. Given the rivalry between Mindan and Sōren, one’s social identity will be influenced by whether one is involved with Mindan or Sōren. In contrast, his/her personal identity may develop through more personal experiences and generally transcends the simple Mindan-Sōren division. The analysis will show that the relocation debate was caused by these various identities, which manifested and became dominant depending on context, leading to consonance or dissonance both between and within organizations.

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Early Release Articles: Korean Studies (January 2018)

University of Hawai’i Press and Korean Studies present the following early release articles through a partnership with Project MUSE.

EARLY RELEASE ARTICLE

The Problem of Sovereign Succession in Confucian Ritual Discourse: Constitutional Thought of Reconciliation between Fact and Value by Moowon Cho

EARLY RELEASE BOOK REVIEW

Curative Violence: Rehabilitating Disability, Gender, and Sexuality in Modern Korea by Eunjung Kim (Duke University Press, 2017) reviewed by Sonja M. Kim

All Korean Studies early release articles may be viewed online here.

Please note: Early release manuscripts have been through our rigorous peer-review process, accepted for publication, and copyedited. These articles will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal. These articles have not yet been through the full production process and therefore may contain errors. These articles will be removed from the early release page once they are published as part of an issue.

The next complete volume of Korean Studies will appear in 2018. Sign up for new issue email alerts from Project MUSE here.

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture, vol. 10 (2017)

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Candle Light Protest, 12 November 2016, Gwanghwamun Square, Seoul. Images From Chung Taek Yong in this issue of Azalea.

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture volume 10 features the following writings, poetry, and artwork:

CONTENTS:

David R. McCann
Editor’s Note

I am bringing ten years’ association with AZALEA journal to an end with this essay, this issue. I am so very grateful to Young-Jun Lee, whose creation the journal was, is, and will always be, and also
to the translators, authors, and literary scholars in Korea, North
America, and around the globe who have contributed their work
to this effort. For Harvard University’s Korea Institute, which has
provided staff, office space, storage closets and shelves, and above all
a spirit of dedication to the field, my gratitude is immense. Finally,
my thanks to the International Communications Foundation of
Seoul, which has provided both financial support over the years and
encouragement for the effort here and in meetings in Korea on the
subject and the project.

Writer in Focus: Kim Sagwa

Bruce Futlon
Introduction

Kim Sagwa
Chunhŭi

Strange and Ominous Presentiments

P’ul Recumbent

Speaking of Disdain
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