Tag Archives: linguistics

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society – Volume 10:2 (2017)

From Quality of Javanese and Sundanese Vowels in this issue. Map of Traditional Languages in Java Island.

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society has published three new articles now available online for volume 10, number 2 (2017).

From On the Linguistics Affiliation for ‘Tai Loi’ in this issue. Locations of groups referred to as ‘Tai Loi’.

Quality of Javanese and Sundanese Vowels by Arum Perwitasari, Marian Klamer, Jurriaan Witteman, and Niels O. Schiller

On the Linguistic Affiliation of ‘Tai Loi’ by Elizabeth Hall

Sources of Written Burmese –ac and related questions in Burmese historical phonology by Rudolph Yanson

Old Burmese ry- – a Remark on Proto-Lolo-Burmese Resonant Initials by Yoshio Nishi

JSEALS is an open access publication. All journal content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license. Sponsor: Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

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The new issue of Oceanic Linguistics is here (with a new look!)

In 55 years, Oceanic Linguistics has grown from a 41-page inaugural issue stapled together to perfect-bound tomes published biannually. But as the field—and the journal—expanded, the cover remained constant with its signature blue logo since 1966. Now in its 56th volume, Oceanic Linguistics has a new look, reflecting Oceania.

Through the years: Oceanic Linguistics covers.

We’re thrilled to share this cover redesign with you. In addition to checking out the new issue, learn more about Oceanic Linguistics in this interview with editor John Lynch and peruse this free issue on Project MUSE detailing 50 years of Oceanic Linguistics history.


Oceanic Linguistics Vol. 56, No. 1 includes the following works:

ARTICLES

  • Verb-Adjacent Clitic Climbing and Restructuring in Isbukun Bunun by Lillian Li-Ying Li
  • Influence of Social Network on Language Use of Kejaman Speakers
    in Sarawak, Malaysia:
    by Amee Joan and Su-Hie Ting
  • The Vitality of Minority Languages in Malaysia by Paolo Coluzzi
  • Event Integration and Argument Realization in Nonconcordant Verb Serialization in Tsou by Gujing Lin
  • A First Reconstruction of Vowels in Proto-Timor-Alor-Pantar by Tyler M. Heston

Squibs

  • The Challenge of Semantic Reconstruction: Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *suku ‘lineage; quarter’? by Robert Blust
  • Stress and Gemination in Alor-Pantar Languages: Revising Heston (2016) by Antoinette Schapper

REVIEWS

  • Jean-Michel Charpentier and Alexandre François’s Linguistic atlas of French Polynesia/Atlas linguistique de la Polynésie française reviewed by Mary Walworth

Plus more articles, squibs, and reviews

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Call for Papers: Palapala

Palapala

Palapala: a journal for Hawaiian language and literature seeks papers for forthcoming volumes. Read the complete call for papers from the editors below:

Aloha Kākou!

Palapala is Hawaiʻi’s first academic, peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the study of and literature produced in ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi. Following the online release of our first volume, we are eager to call for new submissions for future annual editions. Our first volume can be accessed online for free through the following link: Palapala Vol. 1

Palapala journal comes to us at a time when despite a growing number of speakers and academic work being produced in Hawaiian, there are few avenues through which scholars can share their research within a centralized, peer-reviewed archive dedicated to their language of study. Though Hawaiian is one of the most well-preserved indigenous languages in the world today, few outside of Hawaiʻi think to give it the scholarly attention it deserves, and there is still much archival information left for us to discover. It is our hope that Palapala will create a shift in this trend, and help bring Hawaiian and Hawaiian literature back to the forefront of scholarship, particularly in Hawaiʻi schools, but also throughout the academic world. Those eager to study Hawaiian language and culture should have more access to academically-credible, peer-reviewed works, which Palapala hopes to produce and provide for the community of scholars interested in na mea Hawaiʻi. It is our ambition that with this journal, we can continue to expand our knowledge of ancestral Hawaiʻi, and share that ʻike with the global community.

Palapala currently solicits three types of contributions:

  1. New research on Hawaiian language and literature.
  2. Book reviews on significant new books as well as books that have been widely used as references for people working in Hawaiian.
  3. Important reprints of newspaper and journal articles that continue to be important for new research, whether from the Hawaiian language newspapers or from other sources that are now difficult to access.

Palapala prints articles in Hawaiian, English, and, if we can find peer reviewers, other languages. Anyone interested in contributing as an author or peer-reviewer may address an email to the editors at palapala@hawaii.edu. Please note that the annual deadline for submissions is September 1.

In honor of the many kupuna who strove to preserve Hawaiian language during its time of adversary, we look forward to embarking on this important voyage towards a better future for ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi.

Submission guidelines: Submissions (research articles and reviews) must be original works not scheduled for publication by another publisher or original work for which the contributor has received all necessary permissions to republish as open access. Reprints of important articles may also be submitted. Please send proposals or full-length articles for consideration to the editors at palapala@hawaii.edu.

Manuscripts must be provided in Word doc format with all images and tables extracted as separate files. Please format all manuscript notes as endnotes and refer to the 16th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style for citations and style guidelines. Please see the University of Hawai‘i Press Manuscript Guidelines for more details.

Upon acceptance, contributors will be asked to sign a publication agreement with University of Hawai‘i Press, and all content in Palapala is published under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society – Volume 10: 1 (2017)

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society has published four new articles now available online for volume 10, number 1 (2017).

The Historical Phonology of Kriang, A Katuic Language by Ryan Gehrmann

A Description and Linguistic Analysis of the Tai Khuen Writing System by R. Wyn Owen

Discourse Functions of Zero Pronouns in Tai Dam by Itsarate Dolphen

Phonological Sketch of Helong, an Austronesian Language of Timor by Misriani Balle

JSEALS is an open access publication. All journal content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license. Sponsor: Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Palapala: a journal for Hawaiian language and literature – Volume 1, Issue 1 (2017)

PalapalaThe University of Hawai‘i Press is proud to publish a new, open-access resource for Hawaiian scholars, Palapala: a journal for Hawaiian language and literatureIt is the first peer-reviewed Hawaiian language journal to be published exclusively online.

The entirety of Palapala volume 1, issue 1, which includes contemporary research in both Hawaiian and English, is available for free through UH library’s ScholarSpace:

No Palapala / About Palapala

  • Editors’ introduction (Keola Donaghy, ku‘ualoha ho‘omanawanui, Kapali Lyon, ‘Ōiwi Parker Jones, Hiapokeikikāne K. Perreira)

Nā ‘Atikala Noi‘i Hou / New Research

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Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society -Volume 10: 1 (2017)

The UJSEALSniversity of Hawai’i Press is pleased to work with the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society to publish the Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society.

For additional information about the journal please visit the journal home page.

The first five articles are now available online for volume 10, number 1 (2017). Additional content will be posted online at:  https://evols.library.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10524/52368

Phonological Sketch of the Sida Language of Luang Namtha, Laos by Nathan Badenoch and Hayashi Norihiko

On the Number of Voices in Madurese by Helen Jeoung

Biliteracy across Scripts: Implications for Language Development in Southeast Asia by Christina Page

An evaluation of So language vitality in Thailand by Thomas M. Tehan and Linda Markowski

A Phonological Comparison of Gamale, Sheram and Ghusbang – Three Kham Varieties by  Christopher P. Wilde

JSEALS is an open access publication. All journal content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license.

Sponsor: Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 55, no. 2 (2016)

Figure from Tom Hoogervorst's Problematic Protoforms: 1) Indian śula (after Bunce 1975:278); 2) Javanese suligi (after Raffles 1817:appendix);" "3) Javanese baḍik (ibidem)."

Figure from Tom Hoogervorst’s Problematic Protoforms: 1) Indian śula (after Bunce 1975:278); 2) Javanese suligi (after Raffles 1817:appendix);”
“3) Javanese baḍik (ibidem).”

Oceanic Linguistics Vol. 55, No. 2 includes the following works:

ARTICLES

  • The Plural Marker in Kove, an Oceanic Language of Papua New Guinea by Hiroko Sato
  • Conditioned Sound Changes in the Rapanui Language: by Albert Davletshin
  • Semantic Verb Classes and Regularity of Voice Paradigms in Tagalog by Sergei B. Klimenko and Divine Angeli P. Endriga
  • Bride-price, Baskets, and the Semantic Domain of “Carrying” in a Matrilineal Society by Deborah Hill
  • Imperatives and Commands in Manambu by Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald
  • …and more

IN Memoriam

  • Ann Chowning, 1929-2016

REVIEWS

  • Rob van Albada and Th. Pigeaud’s Javaans-Nederlands Woodenboek reviewed by Stuart Robson
  • Joel Bradshaw reviews Karl Neuhaus’s Grammar of the Lihir Language of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea

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