Tag Archives: Uab Meto

The new issue of Oceanic Linguistics is here (with a new look!)

In 55 years, Oceanic Linguistics has grown from a 41-page inaugural issue stapled together to perfect-bound tomes published biannually. But as the field—and the journal—expanded, the cover remained constant with its signature blue logo since 1966. Now in its 56th volume, Oceanic Linguistics has a new look, reflecting Oceania.

Through the years: Oceanic Linguistics covers.

We’re thrilled to share this cover redesign with you. In addition to checking out the new issue, learn more about Oceanic Linguistics in this interview with editor John Lynch and peruse this free issue on Project MUSE detailing 50 years of Oceanic Linguistics history.


Oceanic Linguistics Vol. 56, No. 1 includes the following works:

ARTICLES

  • Verb-Adjacent Clitic Climbing and Restructuring in Isbukun Bunun by Lillian Li-Ying Li
  • Influence of Social Network on Language Use of Kejaman Speakers
    in Sarawak, Malaysia:
    by Amee Joan and Su-Hie Ting
  • The Vitality of Minority Languages in Malaysia by Paolo Coluzzi
  • Event Integration and Argument Realization in Nonconcordant Verb Serialization in Tsou by Gujing Lin
  • A First Reconstruction of Vowels in Proto-Timor-Alor-Pantar by Tyler M. Heston

Squibs

  • The Challenge of Semantic Reconstruction: Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *suku ‘lineage; quarter’? by Robert Blust
  • Stress and Gemination in Alor-Pantar Languages: Revising Heston (2016) by Antoinette Schapper

REVIEWS

  • Jean-Michel Charpentier and Alexandre François’s Linguistic atlas of French Polynesia/Atlas linguistique de la Polynésie française reviewed by Mary Walworth

Plus more articles, squibs, and reviews

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Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 55, no. 2 (2016)

Figure from Tom Hoogervorst's Problematic Protoforms: 1) Indian śula (after Bunce 1975:278); 2) Javanese suligi (after Raffles 1817:appendix);" "3) Javanese baḍik (ibidem)."

Figure from Tom Hoogervorst’s Problematic Protoforms: 1) Indian śula (after Bunce 1975:278); 2) Javanese suligi (after Raffles 1817:appendix);”
“3) Javanese baḍik (ibidem).”

Oceanic Linguistics Vol. 55, No. 2 includes the following works:

ARTICLES

  • The Plural Marker in Kove, an Oceanic Language of Papua New Guinea by Hiroko Sato
  • Conditioned Sound Changes in the Rapanui Language: by Albert Davletshin
  • Semantic Verb Classes and Regularity of Voice Paradigms in Tagalog by Sergei B. Klimenko and Divine Angeli P. Endriga
  • Bride-price, Baskets, and the Semantic Domain of “Carrying” in a Matrilineal Society by Deborah Hill
  • Imperatives and Commands in Manambu by Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald
  • …and more

IN Memoriam

  • Ann Chowning, 1929-2016

REVIEWS

  • Rob van Albada and Th. Pigeaud’s Javaans-Nederlands Woodenboek reviewed by Stuart Robson
  • Joel Bradshaw reviews Karl Neuhaus’s Grammar of the Lihir Language of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea

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Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 55, no. 1 (2016)

The location of languages of Timor, Map1 from the Oceanic Linguistics vol. 55 no. 1 article, “Parallel Sound Correspondences in Uab Meto” by Owen Edwards.

ARTICLES in Oceanic Linguistics Vol. 55, No. 1:

  • Time as Space Metaphor in Isbukun Bunun: A Semantic Analysis by Shuping Huang
  • Pluractionality in Ranmo by Jenny Lee
  • Parallel Sound Correspondences in Uab Meto by Own Edwards
  • Indirect Possessive Hosts in North Ambrym: Evidence for Gender by Michael Franjieh
  • Raising out of CP in Mod-Asp Adverbial Verb Constructions in Amis by Yi-Ting Chen
  • The Noun-Verb Distinction in Kanakanavu and Saaroa: Evidence from Pronouns by Stacy F. Teng and Elizabeth Zeitoun
  • Reassessing the Position of Kanakanavu and Saaroa among the Formosan Languages by Elizabeth Zeitoun and Stacy F. Teng
  • Magi: An Undocumented Language of Papua New Guinea by Don Daniels
  • On the Development of the Lexeme aya in Paiwan by Fuhui Hsieh
  • Kelabit-Lun Dayeh Phonology, with Special Reference to the Voiced Aspirates by Robert Blust
  • Reviews by Victoria Chen, Michael Yoshitaka Erlewine, Gary Holton, and Tyler Heston

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