Tag Archives: University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

Pacific Science, vol. 71, no. 1 (2017)

From ‘Range Expansion of the Small Carpenter Bee Ceratina smaragdula across the Hawaiian Archipelago with Potential Ecological Implications for Native Pollinator Systems’ in this issue. Female (left) and male (right) Ceratina (Pithitis) smaragdula: face, a, b; dorsal view, c, d; lateral view, e, f. Body length is between 6 and 8 mm on average. Note relatively prominent facial maculation and black abdominal patches of the male.

Preview Pacific Science, vol. 71 no. 1 with the following article free for all from Bio-One:

New Species of Stylasterid (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa: Anthoathecata: Stylasteridae) from the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands by Stephen D. Cairns

Also inside this quarter’s issue, Wyatt A. Shell examines small green carpenter bee range expansion in Hawai’i:

Invasive bee species may have a widely detrimental impact on their novel host ecosystem. Introduced bees can rapidly disrupt native plantpollinator mutualisms through competition with indigenous pollinator fauna and facilitation of invasive flora reproduction. […] Here we present a comprehensive synthesis of C. smaragdula’s known biological and ecological history, as well as a population genetic analysis of C. smaragdula from Maui, and from locations across its native range, at the cytochrome oxidase I (COI ) locus. We update C. smaragdula’s known distribution and occurrence elevation in Hawai‘i and reveal a lack of genetic structure between Hawaiian and native range populations.

Scholarly articles in this issue:

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Curve of the Hook: An Archaeologist in Polynesia (MANOA 28-1)

This issue of MĀNOA (28-1), Curve of the Hook: An Archaeologist in Polynesia is a booklength interview with Dr. Yosihiko Sinoto, known for the astonishing archaeological discoveries that changed our ideas of the ancient Polynesians, their ways of life, and their legendary voyages across the Pacific. Dr. Sinoto’s discoveries included whale-tooth pendants, stone tools and weapons, sacred structures, dwellings, an ancient voyaging canoe, and finely made fishhooks that allowed him and his fellow archaeologists to chart the seafaring routes of early Polynesians.

Now, in Curve of the Hook, we can experience the extraordinary adventures and career of an eminent and celebrated archaeologist in Polynesia. This full-color book includes over 100 illustrations—including unpublished photos from Dr. Sinoto’s private collection—plus notes and a list of references.

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Pacific Science, vol. 70, no. 4 (2016)

From Identity and Distribution of Introduced Slugs ( Veronicellidae) in the Hawaiian and Samoan Islands in this issue. Photographs and drawings of three veronicellid species dissected to show structures used to distinguish them. 1: Veronicella cubensis (representative specimen from Hawai‘i); 2: Laevicaulis alte (representative specimen from Hawai‘i); 3: Sarasinula plebeia [no live specimen was available for dissection; this illustration is of the “plesiotype” of Thomé (1971) in the Muséum nationale d’Histoire naturelle, Paris, mnhn 21307]. Key reproductive structures that differ among the species: a, penis; b, digitiform gland papilla; c, digitiform tubules.

Pacific Science, vol. 70 no. 4 is now available and contains the following articles:

  • Spatial Scale, Genetic Structure, and Speciation of Hawaiian Endemic Yeasts by Marc-André Lachance, Julie D. Collens, Xiao Feng Peng, Alison M. Wardlaw, Lucie Bishop, Lily Y. Hou, and William T. Starmer
  • Alien Insects Dominate the Plant-Pollinator Network of a Hawaiian Coastal Ecosystem by Kimberly Shay, Donald R. Drake, Andrew D. Taylor, Heather F. Sahli, Melody Euaparadorn, Michelle Akamine, Jennifer Imamura, Doug Powless, and Patrick Aldrich
  • Avian Abundances on Yap, Federated States of Micronesia, after Typhoon Sudall by W. Douglas Robinson and Tara R. Robinson
  • Habitat Use and Status of the Bokikokiko or Christmas Island Warbler (Acrocephalus aequinoctialis) by Eric A. VanderWerf, Ray Pierce, Ratita Bebe, and Katareti Taabu
  • Temporal Variation in Macro-Moth Abundance and Species Richness in a Lowland Fijian Forest by Siteri Tikoca, Simon Hodge, Sarah Pene, John Clayton, Marika Tuiwawa, and Gilianne Brodie
  • Seasonal Growth Fluctuations of Four Species of Neritid Gastropods in an Upper Mangrove Estuary, Ishigaki Island, Japan by Yoshitake Takada
  • Identity and Distribution of Introduced Slugs (Veronicellidae) in the Hawaiian and Samoan Islands by Jaynee R. Kim, Kenneth A. Hayes, Norine W. Yeung, and Robert H. Cowie
  • Eleotris bosetoi ( Teleostei: Gobioidei: Eleotridae), a New Species of Freshwater Fish from the Solomon Islands by Marion I. Mennesson, Philippe Keith, Brendan C. Ebner, and Philippe Gerbeaux
  • First Record of Bryozoan Amathia (= Zoobotryon) verticillata (Bryozoa: Vesiculariidae) from Taiwan by Dan Minchin, Ta-Kang Liu, and Muhan Cheng

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Pacific Science, vol. 70, no. 3 (2016)

From article “Biology and Impacts of Pacific Islands Invasive Species,” in this issue. Mikania micrantha flower clusters (top left), seed clusters (top right), seeds (bottom left), and sprouting from a node (bottom right).

Pacific Science, vol. 70 no. 3 is now available and contains the following articles:

  • Biology and Impacts of Pacific Islands Invasive Species. 13. Mikania micrantha Kunth (Asteraceae) by Michael D. Day, David R. Clements, Christine Gile, Wilmot K. A. D. Senaratne, Shicai Shen, Leslie A. Weston, and Fudou Zhang

  • Trends in Marine Foraging in Precontact and Historic Leeward Kohala, Hawai‘i Island by Julie S. Field, Jacqueline N. Lipphardt, and Patrick V. Kirch

  • Patterns of Floral Visitation to Native Hawaiian Plants in Presence and Absence of Invasive Argentine Ants by Heather F. Sahli, Paul D. Krushelnycky, Donald R. Drake, and Andrew D. Taylor

  • Home Range Estimates of Feral Cats (Felis catus) on Rota Island and Determining Asymptotic Convergence by Brian T. Leo, James J. Anderson, Reese Brand Phillips, and Renee R. Ha

  • Nutrient and Organic Matter Inputs to Hawaiian Anchialine Ponds: Influences of N-Fixing and Non-N-Fixing Trees by Kehauwealani K. Nelson-Kaula, Rebecca Ostertag, R. Flint Hughes, and Bruce D. Dudley

  • Feasibility of Using Passive Integrated Transponder Technology for Studying the Ecology of Juvenile Striped Mullet (Mugil cephalus) in Streams by Kauaoa M. S. Fraiola and Stephanie M. Carlson

  • Molecular Phylogeny, Revised Higher Classification, and Implications for Conservation of Endangered Hawaiian Leaf-Mining Moths (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae: Philodoria) by Chris A. Johns, Matthew R. Moore, and Akito Y. Kawahara

  • Helminths of Five Species of Gonocephalus Lizards (Squamata: Agamidae) from Peninsular Malaysia by Stephen R. Goldberg, Charles R. Bursey, and L. Lee Grismer

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Pacific Science, vol. 70, no. 2 (2016)

A fourth generation Achatinella fuscobasis born into captivity at the University of Hawai'i’s tree-snail captive rearing facility. This population’s wild counterparts were long ago wiped out by invasive predators. Sischo et al. (this issue) examined genetic and demographic trends in the captive population over a period of more than 20 years (Photo by David R. Sischo).

Photo by David R. Sischo
A fourth generation Achatinella fuscobasis born into captivity at the University of Hawai’i’s tree-snail captive rearing facility. This population’s wild counterparts were long ago wiped out by invasive predators. In this issue David R. Sischo examines genetic and demographic trends in the captive population over a period of more than 20 years.

Pacific Science, Vol. 70#2, April 2016, is now out and contains the following works:

ARTICLES

Genetic and Demographic Insights into the Decline of a Captive Population of the Endangered Hawaiian Tree Snail Achatinella fuscobasis (Achatinellinae)”
David R. Sischo, Melissa R. Price, Mark- Anthony Pascua, and Michael G. Hadfi eld, 133 Continue reading

UH Press Journal Editor Ames Receives Huilin Culture Award

University of Hawaii News
Roger Ames at the 2016 Huilin Prize Award Ceremony on the campus of Beijing Normal University in China.

University of Hawai’i Press is pleased to announce that Press journal editor Roger Ames has been recognized for his expertise in Chinese philosophy as a recipient of the Huilin Culture Award. Ames, the editor of Philosophy East and West, recently ended his tenure as editor of China Review International over a decade after founding the publication, and accepted the award in Beijing on February 27.

UH News announced the award:

The award committee cited Professor Ames’ extensive work in comparative philosophy, research on Chinese philosophy and his publications on Confucianism, including The Chinese Classic of Family Reverence, Sun Tzu: The Art of War, and a philosophical translation of the Daodejing. Many of his titles have become classics in the study of Chinese philosophy.