Tag Archives: University of Hawai’i at Mānoa

Call for Papers: Rapa Nui Journal

Edited by Dr. Mara A. Mulrooney, Director of Cultural Resources, Bishop Museum

The Rapa Nui Journal (RNJ) is the official, peer-reviewed journal, of the Easter Island Foundation (EIF). The journal serves as a forum for interdisciplinary scholarship in the humanities and social sciences on Easter Island and the Eastern Polynesian region. Each issue may include Research Articles, Research Reports, Commentaries or Dialogues, Book or Media Reviews and EIF News.

rnj_cover

Cover Image courtesy of:
© Stephen, Jesse W. (2005, July 28). The Traveling Moai [At Tongariki near Rano Raraku, Rapa Nui].

RNJ is published twice a year and welcomes contributions from a wide range of social, cultural, indigenous and historical disciplines on topics related to the lives and cultures of the peoples of Rapa Nui and Eastern Polynesia. Abstracts for articles may be published in English, Spanish, and Rapanui. We welcome submissions from scholars across Oceania, North and South America, and beyond.

File Format and Manuscript structure
Article manuscripts are peer-reviewed, and should be 3000 to 9000 words in length. Reports, Reviews and commentaries are not peer-reviewed, and should be 1000 to 6000 words in length.

Manuscripts should be double-spaced with margins of at least 1 inch (2.5 cm) on each side, and submitted as a single Microsoft Word (or similar) file with the following structure:

  1. Article title
  2. Author’s name(s) and contact details for publication
  3. Abstract
  4. Keywords 3-6
  5. Text
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. References
  8. Figures with captions
  9. Tables with captions

Manuscripts should be submitted online.  You may review journal policies and author guidelines on the journal submission site.

Please send inquiries to the Rapa Nui Journal editor at (rapanuijournal@gmail.com).

Subscribe to Rapa Nui Journal through UH Press or browse full-text issues online .

 

Call for Nominations: 2018 Biography Prize

The editors of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa have announced their call for nominations for the 2018 Biography Prize, which is awarded to an UH Mānoa graduate student who demonstrates excellency in life writing.

The Biography Prize winner receives a monetary award and is invited to give a presentation in the Brown Bag Biography lecture series.

NOMINATION DEADLINE

Nominations–which should include the student’s name, contact information, and project title–are due to biograph@hawaii.edu by Monday, April 16.

Once nominations are received, the Center for Biographical Research will notify the student to arrange for submission of the project. Candidates may also nominate their own work for the award.

Some candidates will be working on their manuscripts well into April, and this will not be a problem so long as they are able to submit their work by the April 16 deadline.

CRITERIA FOR NOMINATION

  1. The candidate should be a PhD or MA student in any graduate department of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (or have graduated with an MA or PhD in December 2017).

  2. The submission can be work that is written for a class, that is a section of a thesis or dissertation, or that is the completed thesis or dissertation. If written for a class, it should be work completed between May 2017 and May 2018 (and not previously submitted for a Biography Prize).

The project should focus on or intersect with any aspect of life writing theory, history, or practice in any medium and discipline

The project should be at least 3,000 to 10,000 words in length: longer projects can be submitted in their entirety, with a particular chapter or section highlighted for consideration. The work should demonstrate knowledge or awareness of central debates and theorizing in the field and study of life writing.

See flyer below or visit CBR’s Facebook page for more details.

Biography Prize 2018 Announcement


Read Biography archives at Project MUSE


Sign up to receive e-mail alerts about Biography new issues from Project MUSE

 

Spring 2018 Biography Brown Bag Series

The editors of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly and directors of the Center for Biographical Research at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa have released their Spring 2018 schedule of Biography Brown Bags.

If you’re in Hawai’i, mark your calendars and BYOL (bring your own lunch) to these exciting discussions about life writing. Unless otherwise noted, the following brown bags are held from noon to 1:15 p.m. Thursdays in Kuykendall Room 409-A at UH Mānoa. Click here for visitor parking information.

February 1: “Themes in the Narratives by Escapees from the Holocaust in WWII Italy.”
Luciano Minerbi, Dept. of Urban and Regional Planning, UH-Mānoa

February 8: “Constructing Post-Soviet Stardom: Auteur and the state in the case of Renata Litvinova.” Olga Mukhortova, Languages and Literatures of Europe and the Americas, UH Mānoa

February 15: “Writing With Not About: Constellating Stories in Auto-ethnography.”
John Gagnon, Dept. of English, UH-Mānoa

February 22: “Masters of the Currents: Theater, Community, and Social Change.”
Leilani Chan and Ova Saopeng, TeAda Productions

March 1*: “Island Soldiers: Living with Militarization in Micronesia.” Pacific Island Student Panel co-organized by the Marianas Club, for Mes Chamoru and Nuclear Remembrance Day. Moderated by Craig Santos Perez.
*This session will be held in Kuykendall Room 410

March 8: “Hulahula and Learn Something: Expressing Culture and Science.” Kiana Frank, Pacific Biosciences Research Center, UH-Mānoa

March 15: “Selling It Like It Is: The Value of Narrative in Business and Policy.” Amanda Rothschild, Dept. of Urban and Regional Planning, UH-Mānoa

March 22: “An Introduction to the Jon Van Dyke Archive at the UHM Law Library.” Ellen-Rae Cachola, William S. Richardson School of Law, UH-Mānoa

April 5: “Losing Don Belton: Meditations on Friendship, Murder, and Race, and the Ethics of Life Writing.” Mara Miller, Visiting Scholar with the Center for Biographical Research and Dept. of English, UH-Mānoa

April 12: “Al Harrington: Reflections on Genealogy, Acting, and a Polynesian Revue.” Al Harrington, Educator, Actor, and Entertainer

April 19: “Filling the Void: Creating Playing Space for Today’s Pacific Islander.”
Kiki Rivera, Dept. of Theatre and Dance, UH-Mānoa

Apr 26*: “Exploring the Vā in the Oral Sharing of Poetry.” Grace Teuila Taylor, Visiting Writer in Residence, Dept. of English, UH-Mānoa
*This session will be held in Kuykendall Room 410

See flyer below or visit CBR’s Facebook page for more details.

Spring 2018 Biography Brown Bag Flyer


Read Biography archives at Project MUSE


Sign up to receive e-mail alerts about Biography new issues from Project MUSE

 

Interview: The Contemporary Pacific editor Alexander Mawyer

Alexander Mawyer‘s passion for Pacific Island studies is contagious​, and has led him to a prolific career in Hawai`i and abroad​. As a graduate of the University of Hawai`i at Mānoa and the University of Chicago, he has conducted research with the Mangarevan community in the Gambier and Society Islands of French Polynesia. He has also served as coeditor of Varua Tupu: New Writing from French Polynesia and contributed a chapter for the UH Press volume At Home and in the Field: Ethnographic Encounters in Asia and the Pacific Islands. As an associate professor, he has worked on research involving the languages of Eastern Polynesia and sovereignty issues, and has served as co-director of the Biocultural Initiative of the Pacific in Oceania at UH Mānoa. With Mawyer now at the helm as editor upon its 30th anniversary, and with the launch of a new website for the journal, we asked him to share his approach to gleaning and organizing the content for The Contemporary Pacific

Photo on 1-18-18 at 11.37 AM

What led you to become an editor in this field?

What a striking question! You make me think of Borges’s garden of forking paths, wherein stories ramify, intersect, cross over and back, and all paths turn out to have many beginnings and few, if any, evident ends . . . still a few thoughts come to mind. In the summer after college, I found myself in Honolulu and, among other things, volunteering as an editorial assistant for MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, which Frank Stewart and Robbie (Robert) Shapard had founded some years earlier.

Looking back, that was a serendipitous moment. Still in its first decade, I happened to be present while MĀNOA was coming into its own with growing national and international recognition. I got to know passionately committed local thinkers and writers such as Mahealani Dudoit, who founded ‘Oiwi: A Native Hawaiian Journal in 1999 and who was very often in MĀNOA’s offices in those years. I was trained as an editorial assistant and later as assistant to the managing editor by the inimitable and formidable Pat Matsueda. Frank, Pat, Mahealani, and others on the staff and around at the time were inspiring for their commitment to the ethical imagination and the transformative potential of the inked page.

At some point during my first months with MĀNOA, Frank asked me to write a review of Vilsoni Hereniko’s then freshly published Woven Gods. Vili, a professor at the Center for Pacific Islands Studies, had just edited an issue of MĀNOA dedicated to Oceanic and Pacific Islander writers and writing. At the time, this literary space was almost entirely out of view for those not themselves seizing the pen in home islands and communities. I suppose my review was not a complete disaster since Frank suggested that Vili would enjoy lunching and chatting about my review. As I discovered, Vili’s scholarly spirit expands to fill whatever space he’s in and, somehow, by the end of that lunch he had more or less talked me into doing an MA in Pacific Islands Studies.

A year later, after my MA, I moved to Chicago for my doctorate and did not imagine (and, I think, could not have imagined) that I would ever have the privilege of serving as the editor of The Contemporary Pacific. I am confident that any number of other more recent experiences could be identified as part of the story-garden for how I came to take on this editorship. But in retrospect, I’m struck by how early career experiences play out over years, by how unexpectedly paths cross and re-cross, and by how the kindness of intellectual and professional mentorship was a planting that continues to flower and bear fruit.

Continue reading

The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 30 no. 1 (2018)

Artwork by Maika'i Tubbs, featured in this issue

Next Show in Fifteen Minutes, by Maika’i Tubbs, 2008. The Hawaiians (1970 book by authors Gavan Daws and Ed Sheehan and photographer Robert B Goodman), 15″ x 10″ x 8″. Photo courtesy of the artist. Next Show in Fifteen Minutes is a performance that looks at stereotypical depictions of Native Hawaiians and expectations sometimes placed on them to perform “on command.” In this performance, Tubbs picks up a book from a pedestal, opens it, and folds the pages into a circus tent while singing in Hawaiian. He then unfolds the pages, closes the book, and repeats the performance after fifteen minutes.

This issue of The Contemporary Pacific includes a scholarly resource from the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa Library for “Making Pacific Languages Discoverable;” political reviews covering Polynesia and Micronesia; the work of artist and UH Mānoa grad Maika’i Tubbs; and the following articles and media reviews:

Articles

Book and Media Reviews


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


00_30.1 cover_FINAL_RGBAbout the Journal

The Contemporary Pacific provides a publication venue for interdisciplinary work in Pacific studies with the aim of providing informed discussion of contemporary issues in the Pacific Islands region.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Submissions must be original works not previously published and not under consideration or scheduled for publication by another publisher. Manuscripts should be 8,000 to 10,000 words, or no more than 40 double-spaced pages, including references. Find submission guidelines here.

Mountain/Home: New Translations from Japan (MĀNOA 29:2)

"Mount Fuji in the Spring." Norikane Hiroto. Etching, 1997.

“Mount Fuji in the Spring.” Norikane Hiroto. Etching, 1997. Gift of Philip H. Roach Jr., 2010 (31780). Courtesy of Honolulu Museum of Art.

The new issue of MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, volume 29 number 2, is a collection of Japanese literature in translation edited by Leza Lowitz and Frank Stewart.

From the editors:

Mountain/Home presents new translations of selected Japanese works from the medieval period to the present. The volume opens with traditional folktales, court poetry, Edo Period poetry, and contemporary fiction—all from “One Hundred Literary Views of Mount Fuji,” a collection of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction related to Japan’s national symbol. The works reveal how Japanese attitudes toward Mount Fuji have changed over time, particularly after the country was opened to the West in the nineteenth century.

Table of Contents

One Hundred Literary Views of Mount Fuji: Mount Fuji has been celebrated by poets, novelists, and playwrights for almost 1,500 years, from Japan’s earliest literary works to the present. Peter MacMillan provides these translations and introductions.

  • The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter: Taketori Monogataria tenth-century tale, recounts the origin of Mount Fuji’s name and is one of the earliest examples of Japanese literary fiction.
  • Love Song and Reply: These poems are from the Gosen Wakashū, a major tenth-century anthology of Japanese poetry. Many of the waka in the collection are “dialogue poems,” written in pairs by men and women of the court, speaking the cloaked language of secret love affairs, seductions, and laments.
  • from The Confessions of Lady Nijo: Lost for over six hundred years, Lady Nijo’s manuscript was discovered by a Japanese scholar in the Imperial Library in 1940.
  • A Tale of a Mount Fuji Cave: This story from the Kamakura Period tells of a journey to the mouth of hell and back.
  • Two Haiku by Matsuo Bashō: His poetry broke from the decadent style of the time, finding instead a resonance with nature, simplicity, spontaneity, and originality.
  • Sanshirō: In this excerpt from Natsume Soseki’s 1908 coming-of-age novel, the protagonist, Ogawa Sanshiro, is twenty-three years old.

Continue reading

UH Press Open-Access Journals

OAlogo

In celebration of #OpenAccessWeek, October 23-29, 2017, we’re proud to share a round-up of open-access (OA) journals and OA journal archives published by University of Hawai`i Press. Mahalo to our sponsors, editors, and researchers for making these publications possible and freely available to the public.

UH Press Open-Access Journals

Language Documentation & Conservation

Language Documentation & Conservation (LD&C) is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal sponsored by the National Foreign Language Resource Center and published exclusively in electronic format by the UH Press. The journal is hosted on LD&C’s website.

LD&C publishes papers on all topics related to language documentation and conservation, including, but not limited to, the goals of language documentation, data management, fieldwork methods, ethical issues, orthography design, reference grammar design, lexicography, methods of assessing ethnolinguistic vitality, biocultural diversity, archiving matters, language planning, areal survey reports, short field reports on endangered or underdocumented languages, reports on language maintenance, preservation, and revitalization efforts, plus reviews of software, hardware, books, and data collections.

LD&C publishes one volume per year with no fees either for contributors or for readers. Articles are uploaded four times per year in a publish-on-acceptance model.

Palapala: A Journal for Hawaiian Language and Literature

Palapala is the first peer-reviewed Hawaiian language journal to be published exclusively online. For details on what they publish, please review the journal’s editorial page.

With the inaugural issue appearing in 2017, this journal is provided in open-access format via ScholarSpace through a partnership between UH Press and University of Hawai’i at Mānoa Hamilton Library, and is sponsored by the following departments:

  • College of Arts & Humanities, UH Mānoa
  • Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, UH Mānoa
  • College of Languages, Linguistics & Literature, UH Mānoa
  • Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani, College of Hawaiian Language, UH Hilo

UH Press is seeking additional funding and support for this journal. Interested parties may contact Journals Manager Pam Wilson.

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society (JSEALS) is the peer-reviewed, open-access, electronic journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society.

The journal accepts submissions written in English that deal with general linguistic issues which further the lively debate that characterizes the annual SEALS conferences. Devoted to a region of extraordinary linguistic diversity, the journal features papers on the languages of Southeast Asia, including Austroasiatic, Austronesian, Hmong-Mien, Tibeto-Burman, and Tai-Kadai.

UH Press began publishing JSEALS in 2017; with this partnership, volume 10 and all future issues will appear for free on UH Mānoa’s ScholarSpace. Previous volumes are also available in the society’s online archive.

UH Press Journals with OA Archives

The following UH Press journals also have OA archival issues available on UH Mānoa’s ScholarSpace:

Recent Journal Issues with OA Content

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review

In addition to the print volumes distributed by UH Press, Cross-Currents publishes an e-journal that is in OA format. Click here to read e-journal issue 24, published in September 2017.

Pacific Science: A Quarterly Devoted to the Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region

Pacific Science frequently publishes individual articles in open-access format with institutional support. The October 2017 vol. 71, no. 4 issue includes seven open-access articles on Project MUSE and BioOne.

For a full listing of #OpenAccessWeek news and events at UH Mānoa, please click here.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu