Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture, vol. 11 (2018)

Lim Ok-sang’s Landscape II, 1976, Ink and oil on rice paper, 64 × 128 cm, featured in this issue of Azalea.

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture volume 11 opens with the following note from editor Young-Jun Lee:

The Korean peninsula is now in the midst of a series of remarkable and dramatic changes. People the world over are surprised, curious, and relieved, especially those who feared imminent war on the peninsula. In addition, the first female president of Korea is now in prison, and her predecessor was also arrested and soon will be tried. The current president, who has a very high approval rating, used the Winter Olympics as a stage for international diplomacy and led North Korea to the bargaining table. We do not know if Kim Jong Un will give up nuclear weapons, or if Trump will sign a peace treaty or pledge economic cooperation, but it is no exaggeration to say that these changes are seismic.

With the news that North Korea was developing nuclear weapons and conducting missile tests, and that evacuation drills were taking place in Japan and Hawaii, people with relatives in Korea would call them, worried about their safety. There was also contrasting news. Some foreign media were surprised to hear that nothing appeared to be happening in Seoul, and its inhabitants were going about their daily lives despite the threat of imminent war. In turbulent times, art enables us to grasp these apparent contradictions and complexities. Art can give us insight into the minds of Koreans who are experiencing and responding to events as they happen. This volume of Azalea presents outstanding work that illuminates the Korean spirit under conditions both ordinary and extraordinary.

Writer in Focus: Cheon Myeong-Gwan

Excerpt from Whale
Cheon Myeong-gwan, Jae Won Chung

Twenty
Cheon Myeong-gwan, Jamie Chang

Excerpt from My Uncle Bruce Lee
Cheon Myeong-gwan, Susanna Lim

Pink
Cheon Myeong-gwan, Jamie Chang

A Conversation with Cheon Myeong-gwan
Jamie Chang

Fiction

A Journal from the Alpha-Omega Kosiwon
Park Min-gyu, Kyung Hyun Kim, Sue Heun Kim

Roadkill
Yun Ko Eun, Lizzie Buehler

Sister Thief
Bae Suah, Janet Hong

Forever a Narrator
Kim Ae-ran, Eungee Sung

Poetry

Poems by Kim Joong-Il, Lee Young-ju, Han Kang, Lee Jangwook, Ha Jaeyoun, and An Heeyeon.

Another Perspective

Raising the Profile of Korean Literature Overseas
Seong-Kon Kim

Special Feature: Yi T’aeujun

Introduction to Yi T’aejun’s Travels in China
Jun Youb Lee

Excerpt from Travels in China: A Great New China
Yi T’aejun, Jun Youb Lee

Images

Images and Image Index


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


Sign up to receive e-mail alerts about new issues from Project MUSE


About the Journal

Azalea promotes Korean literature among English-language readers. Azalea introduces to the world new writers as well as promising translators, providing the academic community of Korean studies with well-translated texts for college courses. Writers from around the world also share their experience of Korean literature or culture with wider audiences.

Subscriptions

Subscriptions for both individuals and institutions are available here.

Advertisements

Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 57, no. 1 (2018)

Present-day Languages of Pentecost Island, from “A Follow-up Analysis of Listener (Mis)comprehension across Language Varieties in Pentecost, Vanuatu” by Cindy Schneider and Charlotte Gooskens in this issue of Oceanic Linguistics. Image Source: Andrew Gray, 2016.

The summer issue of Oceanic Linguistics includes the following works:

ARTICLES

  • The Genetic Status of Lamalamic: Phonological and Morphological Evidence by Jean-Christophe Verstraete
  • Plural-Marking Strategies in Äiwoo by Åshild Næss
  • Directional Systems in Philippine Languages by Maria Kristina S. Gallego
  • Sex Differentiable Terms in Languages of Flores Island: A Comparative Review by Gregory Forth
  • Counting by Tens: Specific Counting in Southeast Solomonic Languages by Deborah Hill and Paul Unger
  • A Follow-up Analysis of Listener (Mis)comprehension across Language Varieties in Pentecost, Vanuatu by Cindy Schneider and Charlotte Gooskens
  • The Plural Word hire in Alorese: Contact-Induced Change from Neighboring Alor-Pantar Languages by Francesca R. Moro
  • Lexical Tone in Metnyo Ambel by Laura Arnold
  • The “Mystery Aspirates” in Philippine Languages by Robert Blust

In Memoriam

  • In Memoriam: Jean-Claude Rivierre, 1938–2018 by Claire Moyse-Faurie

Plus book reviews.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


Sign up to receive e-mail alerts about new issues from Project MUSE


About the Journal

Oceanic Linguistics is the only journal devoted exclusively to the study of the indigenous languages of the Oceanic area and parts of Southeast Asia.

Subscriptions

Annual subscription rates are US$120 for institutions and US $40 for individuals. Click here to subscribe.

Submissions

All submissions and editorial inquiries should be addressed to John Lynch, Editor, at oceanic@hawaii.edu.

Call for Papers: Asian / Pacific Island Nursing Journal

Asian / Pacific Island Nursing Journal Special Issue on Technology and Health
Guest Editor: Reimund Serafica, PhD
Co-Editor: Jillian Inouye, Ph.D., FAAN
Deadline: September 30, 2018

The special issue on technology and health will feature articles related to the use of technology and health for Asian-Pacific Islanders. The title of this special issue, Asian / Pacific Island Technology and Health, welcome manuscripts from the United States, Asian and Pacific Island countries. Researchers, educators, graduate students, practitioners and administrators which report the health of Asian populations and health care approaches using technology are welcome.

Please submit your manuscripts in the form of formal papers. For this special issue on Technology, we are particularly interested in the following:

  • Studies on health of Asians, Pacific Islanders, and Asian-Americans with a goal on improving health and achieving equity.
  • Studies of regionally or culturally determined primary care practices.
  • Comparative or review of the state of lifestyle behaviors, common symptoms and their management.

Original and empirical studies using qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-methods are welcome. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles that include, but are not limited to:

  • Methods, interventions, instrumentation, and educational techniques that are unique to this group.
  • Theoretical foundations that increase understanding the unique response to changes in health and illness.
  • Bio psychosocial, spiritual, and ecological impacts on practice, education, and research.
  • Policy issues as a result of rigorous research outcomes.

Complete information on how to prepare and submit articles and proposals may be found online.

Asian / Pacific Island Nursing Journal: Official Journal of the Asian American / Pacific Islander Nurses Association has been accepted for inclusion in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). The journal content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

cover image Asian / Pacific Island Nursing JournalAbout the Journal

Asian / Pacific Island Nursing Journal: Official Journal of the Asian American / Pacific Islander Nurses Association features research papers, empirical and theoretical articles, editorials, abstracts of recent dissertations, and conference summaries that relate to nursing care written by scientists and researchers in nursing and the social sciences.

 

Call for Papers: Rapa Nui Journal

Edited by Dr. Mara A. Mulrooney, Director of Cultural Resources, Bishop Museum

The Rapa Nui Journal (RNJ) is the official, peer-reviewed journal, of the Easter Island Foundation (EIF). The journal serves as a forum for interdisciplinary scholarship in the humanities and social sciences on Easter Island and the Eastern Polynesian region. Each issue may include Research Articles, Research Reports, Commentaries or Dialogues, Book or Media Reviews and EIF News.

rnj_cover

Cover Image courtesy of:
© Stephen, Jesse W. (2005, July 28). The Traveling Moai [At Tongariki near Rano Raraku, Rapa Nui].

RNJ is published twice a year and welcomes contributions from a wide range of social, cultural, indigenous and historical disciplines on topics related to the lives and cultures of the peoples of Rapa Nui and Eastern Polynesia. Abstracts for articles may be published in English, Spanish, and Rapanui. We welcome submissions from scholars across Oceania, North and South America, and beyond.

File Format and Manuscript structure
Article manuscripts are peer-reviewed, and should be 3000 to 9000 words in length. Reports, Reviews and commentaries are not peer-reviewed, and should be 1000 to 6000 words in length.

Manuscripts should be double-spaced with margins of at least 1 inch (2.5 cm) on each side, and submitted as a single Microsoft Word (or similar) file with the following structure:

  1. Article title
  2. Author’s name(s) and contact details for publication
  3. Abstract
  4. Keywords 3-6
  5. Text
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. References
  8. Figures with captions
  9. Tables with captions

Manuscripts should be submitted online.  You may review journal policies and author guidelines on the journal submission site.

Please send inquiries to the Rapa Nui Journal editor at (rapanuijournal@gmail.com).

Subscribe to Rapa Nui Journal through UH Press or browse full-text issues online .

 

Korean Studies, Volume 42, (2018)

Identities Surrounding a Cenotaph for Korean Atomic Bomb Victims
by Yuko Takahashi

KS42

The Cenotaph for Korean Atomic Bomb Victims. Clockwise from top left: the front, back, right, and left sides. (Photos taken by author.)

In 1970, the Cenotaph for Korean Atomic Bomb Victims was erected in Hiroshima by local Koreans, most of whom were associated with South Korea. In the 1980s, this cenotaph gradually came to be seen as discriminatory against Koreans due to its location outside the Peace Memorial Park. In the 1990s, Hiroshima City and the two major organizations of Japanese-resident Koreans (zainichi Koreans), pro-South Korean Mindan and pro-North Korean Sōren, began negotiations to create a “unified” cenotaph that would be moved inside the Park. However, discussions reached a deadlock due to the rivalry between Mindan and Sōren, and also an internal split that occurred within Mindan. This paper will examine why the debate on the relocation of the cenotaph reached a deadlock in the 1990s, with a focus on the identity of zainichi Koreans. While Mindan and Sōren have their own collective identities, each individual zainichi Korean may identify oneself on various levels, from social to personal. An individual’s social identity develops through belonging to and participating in activities of social organizations. Given the rivalry between Mindan and Sōren, one’s social identity will be influenced by whether one is involved with Mindan or Sōren. In contrast, his/her personal identity may develop through more personal experiences and generally transcends the simple Mindan-Sōren division. The analysis will show that the relocation debate was caused by these various identities, which manifested and became dominant depending on context, leading to consonance or dissonance both between and within organizations.

Continue reading

Asian Perspectives, vol. 57, no. 1 (2018)

This issue of Asian Perspectives also features the following scholarly works: Continue reading

China Review International Vol. 23 No. 2 (2016)

Volume 23 #2 of China Review International begins with two featured reviews and a response, along with 20 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese studies.

FEATURES

RESPONSE

REVIEWS

…plus 15 more reviews and works received.


Browse the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


Sign up to receive e-mail alerts about new issues from Project MUSE


00_23.1cover_Page_1

About the Journal

Every quarter, China Review International presents timely, English-language reviews of recently published China-related books and monographs. Its multidisciplinary scope and international coverage make it an indispensable tool for all those interested in Chinese culture and civilization, and enable the sinologist to keep abreast of cutting-edge scholarship in Chinese studies.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

China Review International publishes reviews of recent scholarly literature and “state-of-the-art” articles in all fields of Chinese studies. Reviews are generally published by invitation only; however, unsolicited reviews will be considered for publication based on merit and guidelines can be found here.