Interview: Pacific Science 71:4 special section editors

Published this October, Pacific Science volume 71, no. 4 arrived with a special section on habitat restoration, which includes seven open-access articles. We asked Editor-in-Chief Curtis C. Daehler and guest editors Melissa Price and Robert J. Toonen to weigh in on this issue’s special topic and other research important to the quarterly science journal. 

Image of He'eia National Estuarine Research Reserve

This scenic photo shows the He’eia National Estuarine Research Reserve, where some Pacific Science 71:4 contributors did their research. The reserve is managed in partnership by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the State of Hawai’i. (Photo by Manuel Meija of The Nature Conservancy.)

Vol. 71, Issue 4 includes a special feature: “Scaling Up Restoration Efforts in the Pacific Islands.” Why devote a whole section to this topic?

We have lost a lot of native species to habitat destruction in the Pacific region. Today, considerable attention is being given to protecting native ecosystems, for example, in the Hawai‘i Governor’s Sustainable Hawai‘i Initiative to protect 30% of the state’s watersheds by 2030. However, much less attention is given to restoration efforts, or the conversion of nonnative to native-dominated habitats. Invaded ecosystems may be more at risk for wildfires, and may enhance invasions of nearby native ecosystems. A few large-scale restoration success stories exist, such as that of Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, and there are a number of small-scale efforts across the Pacific led by nonprofit groups. In this issue, we hope to promote conversations about how we can scale up restoration efforts to improve resiliency, promote ecosystem services, and reduce extinction rates across the Pacific region.

Koolaus 2

Melissa Price, guest editor of Pacific Science vol. 71, no. 4, is an assistant professor in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, CTAHR, at UH Mānoa. She provided this picture from her field work.

What challenges did you face in the creation of this special section?

The biggest challenges were representing the range of work being done around the Pacific and asking those working at small scales to think about how their work might be scaled-up. Also, a number of projects were just getting started, and it may be decades before there are results from these efforts. Finally, truly transformative work will likely be transdisciplinary. People involved in restoration must partner across sectors to solve challenging problems associated with restoration, such as seed production, removal of invasive plants and animals, and access for equipment and people to remote locations. We still have a long way to go in these areas, but we hope that this special collection will spark productive conversations.

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Call for Papers: Biography special issue

Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly seeks papers for an upcoming special issue tentatively titled, Biographic Mediation: The Uses of Disclosure in Bureaucracy and Politics.

The issue will be guest edited by Ebony Coletu of Pennsylvania State University.

From the submissions prompt by the Center for Biographical Research:

While personal storytelling in public advocacy has long been a strategy for social movements, biographic mediation emphasizes the interactive dynamics between public disclosure and administrative decision-making. This issue addresses multi-level demands for biographic mediation in contests over public policy, employment, and educational access to explore how disclosure has the capacity to reshape identity or to refocus engagement with policy consequences. Contributors may consider how personal disclosure shapes public debates, when self-narrative is restructured according to political opportunity, and how telling the stories of others becomes a standard mode of political argument.

BIO40-1_cover1_blogAbstracts of 350-400 words are due by December 1, 2017 for consideration. Click here for the complete submission guidelines. Authors of manuscripts selected for publication may also be invited to present on their papers at the University of Hawai’i in August 2018.

Subscribe to Biography through UH Press or browse full-text issues online via Project MUSE.

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Language Documentation & Conservation, vol. 11 new uploads (October 2017)

bowern.pdf - Adobe Acrobat Pro
New uploads have been added to the latest edition of the National Foreign Language Resource Center’s free and open-access journal Language Documentation & Conservation volume 11.

Articles

Linguistic Vitality, Endangerment, and Resilience by Gerald Roche

Choguita Rarámuri (Tarahumara) language description and documentation: a guide to the deposited collection and associated materials by Gabriela Caballero

Losing a Vital Voice: Grief and Language Work by Racquel-María Sapién & Tim Thornes

Liinnaqumalghiit: A web-based tool for addressing orthographic transparency in St. Lawrence Island/Central Siberian Yupik by Lane Schwartz & Emily Chen


Find the full text of the issue at the LD&C webpage


About the Journal

Language Documentation & Conservation is a free open-access journal on issues related to language documentation and revitalization.

Submissions

Instructions for submission can be found on the Language Documentation & Conservation‘s website.

Subscribe

Although Language Documentation & Conservation is a free online journal, subscribers are notified by email when a new issue is released. Subscribe to LD&C here.

Pacific Science, vol. 71, no. 4 (October 2017)

A visual interpretation for a spatial model of the social-ecological zones (wao kanaka, wao lā`au, wao nāhele, wao kele, wao akua) implemented during the aliʻi-era for the ahupuaʻa of Hāʻena, Haleleʻa, Kauaʻi. This model is being used by contemporary resource managers to inform large-scale biocultural conservation and forest restoration efforts within this social-ecological system (see Winter & Lucas, this issue for additional details; image credit: Ben Nyberg).

The October 2017 issue of Pacific Science begins with a Special Feature, which includes seven open-access articles available on Project MUSE and Bio-One.

Special Feature: Scaling Up Restoration Efforts in the Pacific Islands (Open-Access)

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Biography Vol. 40 No. 2 (Spring 2017)

From Writing Through Crisis: Time, History, Futurity in German Diaries of the Second World War in this issue. Loose-leaf diary pages from the Deutsches Tagebucharchiv in Emmendingen. Photograph by Kathryn Sederberg.

This quarter’s Biography opens with a tribute to Barbara Harlow, including this reflection on her life and work by UH Press author S. Shankar:

Photograph of Barbara Harlow in her home in Austin, Texas. Reprinted by permission of the photographer, Tarek El-Ariss.

Barbara Harlow was not a life writing scholar but she was a scholar of life writing. What I mean by this is that Barbara did not situate her work primarily in the field of life writing. Rather, she located it in Ethnic and Third World Studies—to invoke the name of the concentration she helped found in the Department of English at the University of Texas at Austin, where she taught for most of her career. At the same time, a regard for life writing genres is evident everywhere in her work—the book she was working on when she died was a biography of South African radical Ruth First; before that came the book After Lives: Legacies of Revolutionary Writing; and an entire chapter is devoted to life writing in Resistance Literature, her first published book. In that chapter, devoted to prison memoirs, she writes: “These memoirs are to be distinguished too from conventional autobiography inasmuch as the narratives are actively engaged in a re-definition of the self and the individual in terms of a collective enterprise and struggle” (120). So much of her critical work on life writing espouses the spirit of this statement.

— Remembering Barbra Harlow: Resistance and Life Writing by S. Shankar

Read the Editor’s Note and the entire section titled “In Remembrance: Barbara Harlow (1948-2017)” for free at Project MUSE.

More Articles

Plus book reviews and contributors.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


About the Journal

For over thirty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life-writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.

Call for Papers: Cross-Currents

The editorial board of Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review—a joint project of the Research Institute of Korean Studies (RIKS) at Korea University and the Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS) at the University of California, Berkeley—is currently accepting submissions of research articles, as well as proposals for special issues and photo essays.

Cross-Currents is a peer-reviewed, open-access, quarterly online and semi-annual print journal that offers its readers up-to-date research findings, emerging trends, and cutting-edge perspectives concerning East Asian history and culture from scholars in both English-speaking and Asian language-speaking academic communities.

The journal seeks to balance issues traditionally addressed by Western humanities and social science journals with issues of immediate concern to scholars in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. This English-language journal includes scholarship on material from the 16th century to the present day that has significant implications for current models of understanding East Asian history and culture.

Embedded in a web-based platform with functions for collaboration, discussion, and an innovative publishing process, the e-journal uses new technologies to facilitate a dialogue among East Asia scholars around the world that is enhanced by audio-visual and multilingual capabilities. The semi-annual print issues of Cross-Currents (available through University of Hawai‘i Press and Project MUSE) feature research articles from the e-journal (the journal of record for indexing and citation purposes).

Complete information on how to prepare and submit articles and proposals may be found online here.

Cross-Currents is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI), Scopus, the Bibliography of Asian Studies, the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), and Project MUSE. The e-journal operates under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical-NoDerivs 3.0 United States License. 

Please email inquiries to the Managing Editor at crosscurrents@berkeley.edu.


About the Journal

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review offers its readers up-to-date research findings, emerging trends, and cutting-edge perspectives on material from the sixteenth century to the present day that have significant implications for current models of understanding East Asian history and culture. Its semiannual print issues feature peer-reviewed content from the online version of the journal.

 Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions are available through UH Press.

Early Release Book Reviews: Korean Studies, September 2017

University of Hawai’i Press is proud to present the early release of the following book reviews from Korean Studies through a partnership with Project MUSE.

EARLY RELEASE BOOK REVIEWS

Browse all Korean Studies early release articles online here.

Please note: Early release manuscripts have been through our rigorous peer-review process, accepted for publication, and copyedited. These articles will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal. These articles have not yet been through the full production process and therefore may contain errors. These articles will be removed from the early release page once they are published as part of an issue.

Stay tuned for more early release articles from UH Press journals.