Early Release Articles: Philosophy East and West, May 2017

University of Hawai‘i Press is proud to present the early release of the following articles from Philosophy East and West: A Quarterly of Comparative Philosophy through a partnership with Project MUSE.

EARLY RELEASE ARTICLES

Browse all abstracts and HTML versions of Philosophy East and West early release articles online here.

Please note: Early release manuscripts have gone through a rigorous peer-review process and will appear in a future issue of the journal. However, articles have not yet been through the full production process and therefore appear in their original manuscript form, which may contain errors. These articles will be removed from the early release page once they are published as part of an issue.

Stay tuned for more early release articles from UH Press journals in 2017.

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture, vol. 10 (2017)

az image 10

Candle Light Protest, 12 November 2016, Gwanghwamun Square, Seoul. Images From Chung Taek Yong in this issue of Azalea.

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture volume 10 features the following writings, poetry, and artwork:

CONTENTS:

David R. McCann
Editor’s Note

I am bringing ten years’ association with AZALEA journal to an end with this essay, this issue. I am so very grateful to Young-Jun Lee, whose creation the journal was, is, and will always be, and also
to the translators, authors, and literary scholars in Korea, North
America, and around the globe who have contributed their work
to this effort. For Harvard University’s Korea Institute, which has
provided staff, office space, storage closets and shelves, and above all
a spirit of dedication to the field, my gratitude is immense. Finally,
my thanks to the International Communications Foundation of
Seoul, which has provided both financial support over the years and
encouragement for the effort here and in meetings in Korea on the
subject and the project.

Writer in Focus: Kim Sagwa

Bruce Futlon
Introduction

Kim Sagwa
Chunhŭi

Strange and Ominous Presentiments

P’ul Recumbent

Speaking of Disdain
Continue reading

Trans-Humanities Journal

cover trans humanitiesTrans-Humanities publishes materials that expand humanities research to include contemporary cultural and sociological phenomena and to open an academic and discursive space for trans-boundary and multi or trans-disciplinary approaches and communications, not just in the humanities but also the social sciences, the natural sciences, and the arts.

Read for free all three issues of volume 8, 2015 – on Project MUSE

Articles in volume 8 include:

Living in Difficult Times: New Materialist Subject/ivity and Be coming of Posthuman Life by Jajati K. Pradhan and Seema Singh (8#1)

Revising the Human in Samuel Beckett’s Aesthetic Education by
Kelly S. Walsh (8#1)

Special Topic: Fields of Modern Knowledge and Journalism (8#3)

Blade Runner and the Right to Life by Eli Park Sorensen

When Private Life Became Political: German Politicians, Sex Scandals, and Mass Media, 1880–1914  by Frank Bösch

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Subscribe online at: www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/t-trans-humanities

 

Journal of Daoist Studies

jdsThe Journal of Daoist Studies is now available on Project MUSE and is also available for individual online subscriptions from the University of Hawaii Press. To subscribe online, visit: uhpress.hawaii.edu/t3-journal-of-daoist-studies

READ FOR FREE Volume 8 (2015)

The Creation of Daoism by Paul Fischer

This paper examines the creation of Daoism in its earliest, pre-Eastern Han period. After an examination of the critical terms “scholar/master” (zi 子) and “author/school” (jia 家), I argue that, given the paucity of evidence, Sima Tan and Liu Xin should be credited with creating this tradition. The body of this article considers the definitions of Daoism given by these two scholars and all of the extant texts that Liu Xin classified as “Daoist.” Based on these texts, I then suggest an amended definition of Daoism. In the conclusion, I address the recent claim that the daojia 道家/daojiao 道教 dichotomy is false, speculating that disagreement over this claim arises from context in which Daoism is considered: among the other pre-Qin “schools of thought” or among other world religions.

Ge Hong’s Xian: Private Hermits and Public Alchemists by Thomas Michael

This article addresses the position of Ge Hong (283-343) in early medieval Daoism by provoking a reconsideration of earlier forms of Chinese religion. The article argues that Ge Hong’s greatest innovation was his bringing together two separate traditions of early Chinese religion, namely that of the xian (often translated as “immortal”) that I identify with early Daoism, and that of alchemy that somehow was related to the fangshi movement. The article examines the historical trajectory of these two traditions as Ge Hong received them by exploring two of his major works, the Baopuzi neipian and the Shenxian zhuan, and examines the ways in which he relates these two early traditions to each other. He does this by portraying and describing two kinds of xian, which I call “private” and “public.” The article shows that Ge Hong’s accomplishment had a deep and lasting impact of the future traditions of medieval Daoism.

Changing Views on Sexuality in Early and Medieval China Ping Yao

The discourse on sexuality underwent tremendous transformations in early and medieval China. While early imagery and terminology of sexual intercourse reflect a naturalistic attitude toward sexuality, writings from the Han dynasty and the division periods largely reflected the Daoist perception of body, gender, and sex. Such domination gradually gave way to a diverse discourse on sexuality in the Tang, largely due to Buddhist influence and the rise of the examination culture. Tang discourse on sexuality, with its emphasis on sensuality, pleasure, and spiritual bliss, shaped ideals of femininity, masculinity, and intercourse.

Daoist Wisdom for Teachers A Diary Study by David McLachlan Jeffrey

Daoist wisdom as presented in the Daode jing is the philosophy of living in harmony with Dao, considered as the way everything exists. It is one of the three main Chinese worldviews, alongside Confucianism and Buddhism. Its mystical and individualistic essence emphasizes a realization of virtue (de) through an appreciation of paradox and nonaction (wuwei) as well as choosing simplicity and spontaneity or naturalness (ziran) in place of complexity and impulsiveness through adherence to the three core values of compassion, moderation, and humility. Through the Daoist prism, everything coexists mutually and is interdependent because of the interaction of two interdependent elements known as yin and yang. These are not polar opposites but two sides of the same coin. Daoism regards all elements as being complementary in that each defines itself in relation to the other. With this come paradoxical notions of the seemingly weak overcoming the strong in the sense that flimsy bamboo yields to storms and survive while mighty oaks fall, and wind and water patiently flow around rocks while turning them into sand over time.

Please see the complete contents of Volume 8, 2015 -Freely Available online

Most recent issue (Volume 10, 2017) is available to subscribers online.

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Interview: Palapala Editor Jeffrey “Kapali” Lyon

Palapala: a journal for Hawaiian language and literature, launched in spring 2017, is the first peer-reviewed Hawaiian language journal to be published exclusively online. Here, editor Jeffrey “Kapali” Lyon discusses how the journal came together and what it means for Hawaiian research.

Jeffrey “Kapali” Lyon, editor of the new journal Palapala

Tell us how Palapala came together.

I had discussed the idea of a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to Hawaiian language scholarship for several years both in Hilo and Mānoa, and found that nearly all scholars of Hawaiian and Hawaiian literature wanted to see it happen. Many of us were distressed that there was no journal dedicated to such an important subject and that, in order to publish our new work, we had to send our research to journals all around the world, none of which were aimed at scholars who work mostly in Hawaiian. During my second year at Mānoa, about 2011 I think, John Charlot, Bob Stauffer, and I were at dinner, and had a serious discussion on what could be done to move ahead, including choosing a board and a publisher. We agreed that we should try to get one representative from each of the University of Hawai’i colleges where Hawaiian plays an important role, and one representative from outside of the university of Hawai’i system. Once our editorial board was in place, we solicited contributions and met with UH Press representatives who enthusiastically supported the idea of an academic journal dedicated to Hawaiian language and literature.

What makes this issue historic, in terms of Hawaiian scholarship?

Hawaiian is a world-class literature that has received scant attention outside, and often inside, of Hawaiʻi. It is time to change that perception. Also, the Hawaiian language is the medium of one of the worldʻs largest indigenous literatures. It deserves the attention of scholars, particularly now that it is again recognized as an official language of Hawaiʻi. The good news is that we are making history, the bad news is that Hawaiian and Hawaiian literature ever fell into obscurity. We hope that with the coming of this journal, we can help create a shift in its scholarly status today.

Papalala is open-access, meaning anyone can read it for free online. How do you see Palapala being used in the world?

We are now part of the search-engine world. Those interested in Hawaiʻi will be able to find academically credible, peer-reviewed work written by accomplished scholars on a host of subjects centered around Hawaiian language and literature. This is, I believe, far better than printing a few hundred paper copies found in the reference sections of research libraries. We will also produce printed copies of Palapala, but the search-engine is the driving force today behind both simple curiosity and determined digging.

What did you learn about the Hawaiian language from putting this issue together?

What I really learned in this process was how little has been published about Hawaiian and Hawaiian literature in comparison to how much of that literature has been preserved. Each article demonstrates, in its own way, that we are at the beginning of the voyage and that there is so much to learn, so much work to be done on history, word meanings, printing texts, analyzing genres, customs, comparisons with other Polynesian cultures …. I could go on.

Charles Langlas’ article is a case in point. Here we are, nearly two hundred years after Hawaiians began to write about their own culture, and we are only now seeing the first scholarly investigation of when the Hawaiian day began. People living in traditional Hawaiian culture were equipped in ways we scarcely understand today to deal with the world around them, both material and unseen: trees, plants, medicines, sprits, fishing, genealogies, and centuries of oral literature, to name only a few, all preserved using an exact terminology, much of which is not well known to us today. A young adult, or in many cases, even young children of 150 years ago, would make many of us working in Hawaiian today feel foolish and ignorant. They, their ancestors, and many of their descendants possessed linguistic and cultural knowledge far beyond that of any university scholar working in this field, some of which, however, can still be relearned through the study of the language and the literature found in their newspapers, letters, and recordings. In short, I am once again, reminded of how little I know, and how much I still hope to learn.

Anything else we should know?

Palapala prints articles in Hawaiian, English, and, if we can find peer reviewers, other languages. Other than the articles themselves, everything, including article summaries, is printed in Hawaiian accompanied by an English translation.

I believe that literature written in Hawaiian is one of the great, neglected, treasures of world literature. Those who produced this literature, for centuries as oral tradition, and later, since the 1830’s, in newspapers, books, and letters, were trained to express themselves in a reflective, exhilarating eloquence as worthy of the world’s attention as those that are now commonly available to every reader. I would like to see the story of Halemano, one of the world’s great short stories, be as well-known one day as that of Gilgamesh, Oedipus, or the stories of Kafka, and to see university students at Harvard, Oxford, and Munich, have the opportunity to learn to read Hawaiian literature in Hawaiian.

Lastly, here in Hawai’i, I hope that Palapala will contribute to more people committing themselves to speak, read, and write Hawaiian. It is a lei whose fragrance never fades.

Special Event: Learn more at Palapala‘s panel at this weekend’s Hawai‘i Book & Music Festival, 1:00pm Sunday, May 7, 2017. Details: http://hawaiibookandmusicfestival.com/schedule/


PalapalaAbout the Journal

Palapala publishes scholarly, refereed articles on the full range of topics in the field of Hawaiian language. The entirety of Palapala volume 1, issue 1, which includes contemporary research in both Hawaiian and English, is available for free through UH library’s ScholarSpace.

Submissions

All submissions and editorial inquiries should be addressed to Kapali Lyon, Editor, at palapala@hawaii.edu.

Philosophy East and West, vol. 67, no. 2 (April 2017)

This quarter’s journal of comparative Eastern and Western philosophies includes the following scholarly works:

Articles

Zhijue as Appreciation and Realization in Zhu Xi: An Examination through Hun and Po
by Eiho Baba

The Self-Chariots of Liberation: Plato’s Phaedrus, the Upanis.ads, and the Mahābhārata in Search of Eternal Being
by Nina Budziszewska

The Metaphysics and Unnamability of the Dao in the Daodejing and Wittgenstein
by Leo K. C. Cheung

Solving for the Triad: Xunzi and Wendell Berry on Sustainable Agriculture as Ethical Practice
by Matthew Duperon

Continue reading

Early Release Articles: Korean Studies, May 2017

University of Hawai’i Press is proud to present the early release of the following articles from Korean Studies through a partnership with Project MUSE.

EARLY RELEASE ARTICLES

Browse all Korean Studies early release articles online here.

Please note: Early release manuscripts have been through our rigorous peer-review process, accepted for publication, and copyedited. These articles will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal. These articles have not yet been through the full production process and therefore appear in their manuscript form, which may contain errors. These articles will be removed from the early release page once they are published as part of an issue.

Stay tuned for more early release articles from UH Press journals in 2017.