CFP: Journal of World History Special Issue on Gender and Empire

JWH26_1_cvr_imgSpecial Issue

Gender and Empire: Intimacies, Bodies, Detritus

The Journal of World History seeks submissions on the topic of Gender and Empire. For more than three decades scholars have incorporated gender studies
into traditional imperial histories to draw attention to the myriad ways in which imperial projects co-created modern gender identities. Emerging from scholarship on the major European empires of the 19th and 20th centuries (British, French, German, and Dutch), studies of gender and empire now include the United States, Russia, and Japan. Similarly, scholarship on colonized areas around the globe now includes Latin America, both postcolonial and  neo-colonial, in addition to Africa and Asia. The range of research topics has also expanded considerably from literal intersections between gender and empire, as seen in policing prostitution and anti-miscegenation laws, to other less literal but no less body-saturated nanny/child relations; transnational foodways; and automobility to name a few. Regardless of foci, these approaches  investigate formations of embodied race and gender identities as central to the  ideology of imperialism as well as to the daily functioning of colonialism on the ground, with special attention to how the latter undercut the former. Continue reading

Call for Papers to be published in Korean Studies


KS Cover.jpg

Korean Studies seeks to further scholarship on Korea by providing a forum for discourse on timely subjects, and addresses a variety of scholarly topics through interdisciplinary and multicultural articles, book reviews, and essays in the humanities and social sciences. All scholarly articles on Korea and the Korean community abroad are welcomed, including topics of interest to the specialist and non-specialist alike. The journal is invaluable for Korea specialists as well as those whose interests touch on Korea, the Korean community abroad, or Asian, ethnic, and comparative studies.

The journal publishes new research, review articles, and book reviews about various topics within the field of Korean Studies. All articles are printed in English, and all submissions must be in English following the submission guidelines available from the journal home page.  All manuscripts should be submitted with text formatted in Times New Roman, 12-point font, single-spaced, with 1” margins, and pages numbered. Korean transliteration should conform to the McCune-Reischauer system, with the exception that the Yale romanization system may be used in linguistics articles. Original Asian characters may be included in parentheses (e.g., Korean, Chinese, Japanese) for words whose meanings may not be clear when translated into English. See previous issues for reference.

Submission Types:  Korean Studies publishes regular research articles (10,000-word limit), news and viewpoint pieces (2,000-word limit), and book reviews (1,000-word limit). Research articles may present new research findings or review current debates in a specific field. News and viewpoint pieces may take the form of responses to previously published works, either in Korean Studies or another venue. However, note that original authors will have the opportunity to review response pieces and respond with formal replies. Once a manuscript is formally accepted each manuscript will proceed through copy-editing. Once copy-editing is completed every manuscript will be uploaded to the Advance Publication site as a paper formally “In Press” [with associated DOI (Digital Object Identifier)]. It is then downloadable and citable. Formal publication in an issue of the journal, including publication year, volume and page numbers, will occur when the editor has a sufficient number of papers to complete an issue. Once all papers are accepted for an issue the manuscripts are compiled and the production process is completed, at which time the issue will be published online and in print.

Please review the complete Submission Guidelines, available online. Article submissions should be sent to the Editor: Christopher Bae, Center for Korean Studies, University of Hawai‘i.  email: cjbae@hawaii.edu Please send book review inquiries to the Book Review Editor: Ji Young Kim.  email: jkim22@hawaii.edu

Nov. 17 Event at UH: Translating Curve of the Hook

curve-manoa28-1-precvr-to-uhp

Mānoa Editor and Translator to Speak about Translation Process for Curve of the Hook

biography-talkMānoa editor Frank Stewart and guest translator Madoka Nagadō will describe the painstaking process of working on Curve of the Hook: An Archaeologist in Polynesia during a Nov. 17 event at the UHM Center for Biographical Research. The event is part of the center’s weekly Brown Bag Biography series.

The project began with the Mānoa editors wishing to publish a biography about Dr. Yosihiko Sinoto. They eventually found Japanese publication Rakuen Kōkogaku and undertook its translation and editing. In 1996, the book received the Yoshikawa Eiji Cultural Award, and in 1999 was selected as one of the best 100 biographies of a Japanese in the twentieth century. Curve of the Hook has been revised for readers with an interest in Polynesia, archaeology, Pacific history and culture—and for those who simply want to read an enthralling story.

The talk will be held Thursday, November 17, from noon-1:15 p.m. at the Center for Biographical Research in Henke Hall at the University of Hawai‘i. Stewart is a professor of English and Nagadō is a doctoral student in literary studies at the university. Production of Curve of the Hook is cosponsored by the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities. For more information see the attached flier.

biography-talk-flier

Subscribe to Mānoa or order Curve of the Hook here.

Pacific Science, vol. 70, no. 4 (2016)

From Identity and Distribution of Introduced Slugs ( Veronicellidae) in the Hawaiian and Samoan Islands in this issue. Photographs and drawings of three veronicellid species dissected to show structures used to distinguish them. 1: Veronicella cubensis (representative specimen from Hawai‘i); 2: Laevicaulis alte (representative specimen from Hawai‘i); 3: Sarasinula plebeia [no live specimen was available for dissection; this illustration is of the “plesiotype” of Thomé (1971) in the Muséum nationale d’Histoire naturelle, Paris, mnhn 21307]. Key reproductive structures that differ among the species: a, penis; b, digitiform gland papilla; c, digitiform tubules.

Pacific Science, vol. 70 no. 4 is now available and contains the following articles:

  • Spatial Scale, Genetic Structure, and Speciation of Hawaiian Endemic Yeasts by Marc-André Lachance, Julie D. Collens, Xiao Feng Peng, Alison M. Wardlaw, Lucie Bishop, Lily Y. Hou, and William T. Starmer
  • Alien Insects Dominate the Plant-Pollinator Network of a Hawaiian Coastal Ecosystem by Kimberly Shay, Donald R. Drake, Andrew D. Taylor, Heather F. Sahli, Melody Euaparadorn, Michelle Akamine, Jennifer Imamura, Doug Powless, and Patrick Aldrich
  • Avian Abundances on Yap, Federated States of Micronesia, after Typhoon Sudall by W. Douglas Robinson and Tara R. Robinson
  • Habitat Use and Status of the Bokikokiko or Christmas Island Warbler (Acrocephalus aequinoctialis) by Eric A. VanderWerf, Ray Pierce, Ratita Bebe, and Katareti Taabu
  • Temporal Variation in Macro-Moth Abundance and Species Richness in a Lowland Fijian Forest by Siteri Tikoca, Simon Hodge, Sarah Pene, John Clayton, Marika Tuiwawa, and Gilianne Brodie
  • Seasonal Growth Fluctuations of Four Species of Neritid Gastropods in an Upper Mangrove Estuary, Ishigaki Island, Japan by Yoshitake Takada
  • Identity and Distribution of Introduced Slugs (Veronicellidae) in the Hawaiian and Samoan Islands by Jaynee R. Kim, Kenneth A. Hayes, Norine W. Yeung, and Robert H. Cowie
  • Eleotris bosetoi ( Teleostei: Gobioidei: Eleotridae), a New Species of Freshwater Fish from the Solomon Islands by Marion I. Mennesson, Philippe Keith, Brendan C. Ebner, and Philippe Gerbeaux
  • First Record of Bryozoan Amathia (= Zoobotryon) verticillata (Bryozoa: Vesiculariidae) from Taiwan by Dan Minchin, Ta-Kang Liu, and Muhan Cheng

Continue reading

Asian Perspectives, vol. 55, no. 1 (2016)

From Palaeoecology and Forager Subsistence Strategies during the Pleistocene – Holocene Transition: A Reinvestigation of the Zooarchaeological Assemblage from Spirit Cave, Mae Hong Son Province, Thailand in this issue. Cut marks present on a right rib of a Sambar deer ( Rusa unicolor) ( L ayer 2a — S C-00078). Image A taken at 1x magnification on a Nikon SMZ1500 stereomicroscope attached to a SPOT Insight FireWire digital camera; close-up image B taken at 2x. Macro-photograph courtesy of Hannah G. Van Vlack.

In Palaeoecology and Forager Subsistence Strategies during the
Pleistocene–Holocene Transition: A Reinvestigation of the
Zooarchaeological Assemblage from Spirit Cave, Mae Hong Son Province, Thailand authors Cyler Conrad, Charles Higham, Masaki Eda, and Ben Marwick write:

This reanalysis uses the zooarchaeological assemblage recovered from Spirit Cave to understand hunter-gatherer use and occupation at the site during the Pleistocene – Holocene transition. W e analyze bone fragmentation, sample size, and relative abundance to establish the preservation and overall composition of the remaining fauna. Identification of several new taxa, including roundleaf bats (Hipposideros larvatus and bicolor), elongated tortoise (Indotestudo elongata), black marsh turtle (Siebenrockiella crassicollis), Burmese hare ( Lepus cf. peguensis) and a potential red junglefowl ( Phasianidae — ?Gallus gallus) provide insights into hunter-gatherer occupation, palaeoecology, and subsistence strategies between 12,000 and 7000 years b.p.

This issue of Asian Perspectives also features the following scholarly works: Continue reading

Hawaiian Journal of History, Vol. 50 (2016)

From Portraits of Kalaupapa Residents by Father Joseph Julliotte, SS.CC. from this issue. Fathers and Brothers of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary missioned to the Kalaupapa Settlement. Pictured left to right: Brother Sylvanus Van Volsem, Brother Aloysius (Louis) Leisen, Father Wendelin Mollers, Father Paul-Marie (Joseph) Julliotte, Brother Severin Baltes, and Brother Laurence Bergmans at the grave of Father Damien De Veuster, Kalawao, Molokai, 1902. Collection of Congregation of the Sacred Hearts U.S. Province.

In the Notes & Queries section in volume 50 of the Hawaiian Journal of History author Stuart W.H. Ching writes about a collection of glass plate negatives housed  within St. Patrick Monastery in Honolulu.

…This archives contains the collective memory of a religious congregation of priests and lay brothers. Its members were the first Roman Catholic missionaries to the Hawaiian Islands, arriving in 1827. Historical records and visual images found in the Sacred Hearts provincial archives document the Congregation’s personnel and activities as well and that of the communities in which they served. Kalaupapa was one such community for which the Sacred Hearts Congregation left a written and visual record.

Continue reading

Biography Vol. 39 No. 2 (2016)

Figure 6. From page 48 of Bhimayana: Experiences of Untouchability, by Srividya Natarajan and S. Anand; Art by Durgabai Vyam and Subhash Vyam. © Copyright 2011 and reproduced by permission of the authors.

From Radical Graphics: Martin Luther King, Jr., B. R. Ambedkar, and Comics Auto/Biography in this issue. Figure 6. From page 48 of Bhimayana: Experiences of Untouchability, by Srividya Natarajan and S. Anand; Art by Durgabai Vyam and Subhash Vyam. © Copyright 2011 and reproduced by permission of the authors.

This quarter’s Biography contains the following interdisciplinary scholarly works including Pramod K. Nayar’s article on ‘radical’ graphic novels:

From Radical Graphics: Martin Luther King, Jr., B. R. Ambedkar, and Comics Auto/Biography in this issue. Figure 2. From page 58 of King: A Comics Biography, by Ho Che Anderson. © Copyright 2010, and reproduced by courtesy of Fantagraphics.

In the midst of the memoir boom of the late twentieth century, a sub-genre
in a wholly new medium made its presence felt: the graphic memoir and auto/biography. Using Ho Che Anderson’s King (1993–2002, published in a single edition in 2010) about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and S. Anand and Srividya Natarajan’s Bhimayana (2011, with art by Durgabai Vyam and Subhash Vyam), about the Indian social reformer, maker of the Indian Constitution, and leader of the so-called “untouchables” (“lower-castes” in the Hindu social order, now called “Dalits”), Dr. Bhim Rao Ambedkar, I will argue that graphic auto/biography offers a new mode in which to talk about social issues like racism and caste-based oppression.

Continue reading