Pacific Science, vol. 71, no. 1 (2017)

From ‘Range Expansion of the Small Carpenter Bee Ceratina smaragdula across the Hawaiian Archipelago with Potential Ecological Implications for Native Pollinator Systems’ in this issue. Female (left) and male (right) Ceratina (Pithitis) smaragdula: face, a, b; dorsal view, c, d; lateral view, e, f. Body length is between 6 and 8 mm on average. Note relatively prominent facial maculation and black abdominal patches of the male.

Preview Pacific Science, vol. 71 no. 1 with the following article free for all from Bio-One:

New Species of Stylasterid (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa: Anthoathecata: Stylasteridae) from the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands by Stephen D. Cairns

Also inside this quarter’s issue, Wyatt A. Shell examines small green carpenter bee range expansion in Hawai’i:

Invasive bee species may have a widely detrimental impact on their novel host ecosystem. Introduced bees can rapidly disrupt native plantpollinator mutualisms through competition with indigenous pollinator fauna and facilitation of invasive flora reproduction. […] Here we present a comprehensive synthesis of C. smaragdula’s known biological and ecological history, as well as a population genetic analysis of C. smaragdula from Maui, and from locations across its native range, at the cytochrome oxidase I (COI ) locus. We update C. smaragdula’s known distribution and occurrence elevation in Hawai‘i and reveal a lack of genetic structure between Hawaiian and native range populations.

Scholarly articles in this issue:

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Curve of the Hook: An Archaeologist in Polynesia (MANOA 28-1)

This issue of MĀNOA (28-1), Curve of the Hook: An Archaeologist in Polynesia is a booklength interview with Dr. Yosihiko Sinoto, known for the astonishing archaeological discoveries that changed our ideas of the ancient Polynesians, their ways of life, and their legendary voyages across the Pacific. Dr. Sinoto’s discoveries included whale-tooth pendants, stone tools and weapons, sacred structures, dwellings, an ancient voyaging canoe, and finely made fishhooks that allowed him and his fellow archaeologists to chart the seafaring routes of early Polynesians.

Now, in Curve of the Hook, we can experience the extraordinary adventures and career of an eminent and celebrated archaeologist in Polynesia. This full-color book includes over 100 illustrations—including unpublished photos from Dr. Sinoto’s private collection—plus notes and a list of references.

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Asian Perspectives, vol. 55, no. 2 (2016)

From “Aleti Tunu Bibi: Contextualizing a New Rock Art Site in East Timor and the Wider Asia-Pacific Region” in this issue. Calcite veil formed in 2015 over rock paintings in Panel 3 (above); enhanced image using DStretch by Jon Harman, V.7.0, April 2010 ( below). Photo by Jean-Christophe Galipaud 2015.

In the Editors’ Note  Mike T. Carson and Rowan K. Flad write:

The current issue of Asian Perspectives (Volume 55, issue 2) maintains the tradition of keeping readers in touch with new archaeological research findings, approaches, and ideas across the Asia-Pacific region. As always, each work has a geographic focus that refers to substantive datasets from particular places as concrete examples, yet is broadly relevant to research in other regions. Looking into the journal’s future volumes and issues, we invite new manuscripts that emphasize the larger implications of Asian and Pacific archaeological studies beyond geographic boundaries .

This issue of Asian Perspectives also features the following scholarly works: Continue reading

Call for Papers: Journal of World History

Call for PapersJWH_27-2_blog_cover

The Journal of World History publishes research into historical questions requiring the investigation of evidence on a global, comparative, cross-cultural, or transnational scale. Manuscripts must be submitted electronically via the new web portal (jwh.msubmit.net); emailed and mailed article submissions are no longer accepted. Please create an account at this web portal, login, and follow instructions.

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Reception with Dr. Yosihiko Sinoto on publication of Curve of the Hook (Manoa)

Oli by Auli‘i Mitchell at Native Books on Dec. 16. Image courtesy of Mānoa.

Years in the making, the new issue of Mānoa features the work of archaeologist Yosihiko Sinoto, now 92. Upon publication of this special issue, titled Curve of the Hook, Native Books in Honolulu hosted a reception with Dr. Sinoto on Dec. 16.

The reception began with an oli, a chant, by Auli‘i Mitchell, pictured above. Mitchell, a cultural anthropologist, spoke of how he witnessed Dr. Sinoto’s archaeological work in the Pacific years ago. “For me, personally, seeing your work changed my life,” he said.

Dr. Sinoto’s research fundamentally changed the way the world views the accomplishments of ancient Polynesians, whose early voyages are considered to be among the great achievements in human history.

Colleagues, friends and family spoke of Dr. Sinoto’s work and legacy, presenting him with leis, photographs and thanks. Their recollections lent a personal touch to an already impressive and inspiring life in archaeology. Colleagues spoke of Dr. Sinoto’s first student quarters at the University of Hawaii (there were a lot of cats) and field seasons in Tahiti (he was a great dancer).

curve-manoa28-1-precvr-to-uhpCurve of the Hook is the first book-length work in English about Dr. Sinoto’s life and work. The full-color book has more than 100 illustrations, including rare photos from Dr. Sinoto’s private collection, plus notes and a list of references.

Order a single issue or receive this special issue as part of a subscription to Mānoa here.

Cross-Currents, vol. 5, no. 2 (2016)

From “Guozhuang Trading Houses and Tibetan Middlemen in Dartsedo, the ‘Shanghai of Tibet'” in this issue. Photograph of Chu-nyi Barpa achak khapa (Ch. Qiujia guozhuang) taken by Sun Mingjing, 1944.

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review volume 5, number 2 is now available and features the following articles.

Frontier Tibet: Trade and Boundaries of Authority in Kham

  • Introduction to “Frontier Tibet: Trade and Boundaries of Authority in Kham” by Stephane Gros
  • “To Control Tibet, First Pacify Kham”: Trade Routes and “Official Routes” (Guandao) in Easternmost Kham by Partrick Booz
  • Construction Work and Wages at the Dergé Printing House in the Eighteenth Century by Remi Chaix
  • Guozhuang Trading Houses and Tibetan Middlemen in Dartsedo, the “Shanghai of Tibet” by Yudru Tsomu
  • Victorianizing Guangxu: Arresting Flows, Minting Coins, and
    Exerting Authority in Early Twentieth-Century Kham by Scott Relyea
  • Tricks of the Trade: Debt and Imposed Sovereignty in Southernmost Kham in the Nineteenth to Twentieth Centuries by Stephane Gros
  • Memory Politics at Work in a Gyalrong Revolt in the Early Twentieth Century by Jinba Tenzin
  • Afterword: Why Kham? Why Borderlands? Coordinating New
    Research Programs for Asia by C. Patterson Giersch

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Journal of Korean Religions, vol. 7, no. 2 (2016)

Journal of Korean Religions vol. 7, no. 1 , Urban Aspirations in Seoul, features the following articles by scholars:

Special Issue: Urban Aspirations in Seoul

Jin-Heon Jung and Peter van der Veer, Guest Editors

This special issue invites readers to examine dynamic religious aspirations in the urban contexts of South Korea. Focusing on religious practices, adaptations, and material constructions in the making of Seoul, these articles contribute to the growing scholarly discussion on the relationship between the urban and the religious/sacred in the context of Asian cities and beyond (e.g., van der Veer 2015, Goh and van der Veer 2016). This special issue is the culmination of an interdisciplinary research team—the Seoul Lab—which contributed to the larger comparative urban research project of the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity undertaken in Mumbai, Shanghai, and Singapore.

Special issue articles include:

  • Engaged Buddhism for the Curative Self among Young Jungto Buddhist Practitioners in South Korea
    by Hyun Mee Kim and Si Hyun Choi
  • Ummah in Seoul: The Creation of Symbolic Spaces in the Islamic Central Masjid of Seoul
    by Doyoung Song
  • The Politics of Officially Recognizing Religions and the Expansion of Urban ‘‘Social Work’’ in Colonial Korea
    by Michael Kim
  • Punching Korean Protestantism: Challenging from within through a Televised Theological Roundtable
    by Seung Min Hong
  • The Religious-Political Aspirations of North Korean Migrants and Protestant Churches in Seoul
    by Jin-Heon Jung

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