Journal of World History, vol. 28, nos. 3 & 4 (2017)

Excerpt from La Vie Indo-Chinoise

Japanese sex workers occupied a special place in the desires and fantasies of French colonial men in Asia as seen in ‘Our Hungarians,’ La Vie Indo-Chinoise, November 13, 1897. From “Sex and the Colonial City” in this issue.

Journal of World History volume 28, numbers 3&4 is a special double issue guest edited by Tracey Rizzo on Gender and Empire. It includes more than 400 pages of articles and book reviews from world history scholars.

From the Editor’s Introduction:

Gender and Empire as a subfield of world history goes beyond the study of the men and women who made and unmade empires. Intimacies generated ties that facilitated or impeded the modernization of family and nation, demarcating contact zones. Bodies–adorned, fetishized, public–displayed and negotiated imperial relations. Detritus, the material remains of empire and intimacy, lodged itself in the institutions and discourses of modernity. When world historians talk across boundaries and borders, we situate disjointed ruins in broader trends and patterns, without which they are mere curiosities. Assembled here: a Chinese scalp; a silver buckle from Malaya; a bawdy cartoon from Hanoi; a hybrid recipe from Nigeria; dossiers from Lebanon and El Salvador; government orders promoting or suppressing prostitution… Confined to a national or even imperial history, such fragments do not tell us anything about coloniality. Here they do.

Articles

Plus five more articles, 13 book reviews, books received, and the volume index.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


JWH28_3-4_cover1About the Journal

The Journal of World History publishes research into historical questions requiring the investigation of evidence on a global, comparative, cross-cultural, or transnational scale. It is devoted to the study of phenomena that transcend the boundaries of single states, regions, or cultures, such as large-scale population movements, long-distance trade, cross-cultural technology transfers, and the transnational spread of ideas.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the World History Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

The Journal of World History is proud to introduce a new article and peer review submission system, accessible now at at jwh.msubmit.net.

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Early Release Articles: Korean Studies (January 2018)

University of Hawai’i Press and Korean Studies present the following early release articles through a partnership with Project MUSE.

EARLY RELEASE ARTICLE

The Problem of Sovereign Succession in Confucian Ritual Discourse: Constitutional Thought of Reconciliation between Fact and Value by Moowon Cho

EARLY RELEASE BOOK REVIEW

Curative Violence: Rehabilitating Disability, Gender, and Sexuality in Modern Korea by Eunjung Kim (Duke University Press, 2017) reviewed by Sonja M. Kim

All Korean Studies early release articles may be viewed online here.

Please note: Early release manuscripts have been through our rigorous peer-review process, accepted for publication, and copyedited. These articles will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal. These articles have not yet been through the full production process and therefore may contain errors. These articles will be removed from the early release page once they are published as part of an issue.

The next complete volume of Korean Studies will appear in 2018. Sign up for new issue email alerts from Project MUSE here.

Pacific Science, vol. 72, no. 1 (January 2018)

A blue shark

A blue shark (Prionace glauca) caught by a Japanese research vessel in the western North Pacific Ocean. Fujinami et al. (this issue) analyzed feeding habits of blue sharks in the Northwestern Pacific. Photo credit: Akira Kurashima, National Research Institute of Far Seas Fisheries.

Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, begins 2018 with new research on sharks, dolphins, cats, and more biological and physical studies. Preview volume 72, number 1 below and find a list of all articles available on Bio-One and Project MUSE.

Contents

  • Loss of Reservoir Capacity through Sedimentation in Hawai‘i: Management Implications for the Twenty-First Century by Kim Falinski and David Pen

  • Feeding Habits of the Blue Shark (Prionace glauca) in the Northwestern Pacific Based on Stomach Contents and Stable Isotope Ratios by Yuki Fujinami, Sayaka Nakatsuka, and Seiji Ohshimo

  • Presence, Behavior, and Resighting Pattern of Transient Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in the Humboldt Current System off North-Central Chile by Macarena Santos-Carvallo, Maritza Sepúlveda, Rodrigo Moraga, Mauricio F. Landaeta, Doris Oliva, and María José Pérez-Alvarez

  • Modeling Impacts of Hunting on Control of an Insular Feral Cat Population by Brian T. Leo, James J. Anderson, James Ha, Reese B. Phillips, and Renee R. Ha

  • Resource Availability, Propagule Supply, and Effect of Nonnative Ungulate Herbivores on Senecio madagascariensis Invasion by Erin J. Questad, Amanda Uowolo, Sam Brooks, Robert Fitch, and Susan Cordell

…plus more articles and Association Affairs from the PSA.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


Pacific Science 72:1

Pacific Science vol. 72, no. 1 (January 2018)

About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

Biography wins 2017 Best Special Issue Award

Cover of Biography volume 39, number 3

Image courtesy of the Center for Biographical Research at UH Mānoa

Please join us in congratulating the editors and contributors of Biography vol. 39, no. 3 on winning the Council of Editors of Learned Journal’s 2017 Best Special Issue Award!

The Council of Editors of Learned Journals (CELJ), an Allied Organization of the Modern Language Association, is the major national organization representing more than 450 editors of scholarly journals in all disciplines.

Biography vol. 39, no. 3 is the journal’s special issue on “Indigenous Conversations about Biography,” and it was guest edited by Alice Te Punga Somerville, Daniel Heath Justice, and Noelani Arista.

As detailed in the editors’ Introduction, the special issue started here in Mānoa Valley:

This is a conversation about Indigenous lives, the ways we understand them, the ways we represent them, and the responsibilities that come from doing this work in a good way. And this is just a beginning. We are honored to welcome you to this special issue of Biography, and to the Indigenous scholars, artists, and visionaries who come together in community on the topic of Indigenous biography. Some of this diverse group of Indigenous thinkers came together in person in Mānoa Valley on the Hawaiian island of O‘ahu, traveling from the Indigenous territories claimed by New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and the United States to take up the challenges, questions, concerns, and possibilities of representing Indigenous lives.

The complete table of contents and contributors for this issue may be viewed online at Project MUSE.

Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly is published by University of Hawai`i Press for the Center for Biographical Research (CBR) at UH Mānoa. The journal is coedited by Cynthia G. Franklin, Craig Howes, and John David Zuern. Managing editors for vol. 39 were Stanley Schab (emeritus) and Anjoli Roy. Read about CBR’s staff here.

Each year, Biography publishes a special issue that explores a topic of emerging critical interest, often centered around a CBR seminar. This year marks the second time Biography has won the CELJ Award for Best Special Issue, as coeditor Craig Howes explains:
Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has actually received this award once before, for our “Posthuman Lives” issue. That was the first one resulting from our invited seminar in Honolulu process. Alice, Daniel, and Noelani made a number of innovations, including commissioning the two responses to each longer contribution, which created an articulate and powerful community of voices. Their decisions have also strongly influenced how we have conducted the three seminars (!) we have held since then–in Honolulu, and in London.

Contact us to order a single copy, subscribe online, or read the full-text of this issue at Project MUSE (institutional or individual electronic subscription required).

To receive email alerts for when new issues of Biography publish online, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu.

Mountain/Home: New Translations from Japan (MĀNOA 29:2)

"Mount Fuji in the Spring." Norikane Hiroto. Etching, 1997.

“Mount Fuji in the Spring.” Norikane Hiroto. Etching, 1997. Gift of Philip H. Roach Jr., 2010 (31780). Courtesy of Honolulu Museum of Art.

The new issue of MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, volume 29 number 2, is a collection of Japanese literature in translation edited by Leza Lowitz and Frank Stewart.

From the editors:

Mountain/Home presents new translations of selected Japanese works from the medieval period to the present. The volume opens with traditional folktales, court poetry, Edo Period poetry, and contemporary fiction—all from “One Hundred Literary Views of Mount Fuji,” a collection of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction related to Japan’s national symbol. The works reveal how Japanese attitudes toward Mount Fuji have changed over time, particularly after the country was opened to the West in the nineteenth century.

Table of Contents

One Hundred Literary Views of Mount Fuji: Mount Fuji has been celebrated by poets, novelists, and playwrights for almost 1,500 years, from Japan’s earliest literary works to the present. Peter MacMillan provides these translations and introductions.

  • The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter: Taketori Monogataria tenth-century tale, recounts the origin of Mount Fuji’s name and is one of the earliest examples of Japanese literary fiction.
  • Love Song and Reply: These poems are from the Gosen Wakashū, a major tenth-century anthology of Japanese poetry. Many of the waka in the collection are “dialogue poems,” written in pairs by men and women of the court, speaking the cloaked language of secret love affairs, seductions, and laments.
  • from The Confessions of Lady Nijo: Lost for over six hundred years, Lady Nijo’s manuscript was discovered by a Japanese scholar in the Imperial Library in 1940.
  • A Tale of a Mount Fuji Cave: This story from the Kamakura Period tells of a journey to the mouth of hell and back.
  • Two Haiku by Matsuo Bashō: His poetry broke from the decadent style of the time, finding instead a resonance with nature, simplicity, spontaneity, and originality.
  • Sanshirō: In this excerpt from Natsume Soseki’s 1908 coming-of-age novel, the protagonist, Ogawa Sanshiro, is twenty-three years old.

Continue reading

Philosophy East and West, vol. 68, no. 1 (January 2018)

Philosophy East and West vol. 68, no. 1 kicks off the new year with its first release of online book reviews at Project MUSE and the following print articles on comparative Eastern and Western philosophies:

Articles

“Striking Similarities”: Ibn Sīnā’s Takhyīl and Kant’s Aesthetic Judgment
by Balqis al-Karaki

Logos and Dao Revisited: A Non-Metaphysical Interpretation
by Steven Burik

A Chinese Way of Thinking
by Mark Gamsa

Hegel and Islam
by M.A.R. Habib

The Rise of Modern Science: Islam and the West
by Maisarah Hasbullah and Mohd Hazim Shah Abdul Murad

Grounded on Nothing: The Spirit of Radical Criticism in Nishida’s Philosophy
by Yūjin Itabashi

Ibn Sīnā’s Solution to Kant’s Challenging View of Existence
by Mirsaeid Mousavi Karimi

Is the Empathy-Induced Motivation to Help Egoistic or Altruistic: Insights from the Neo-Confucian Cheng Hao
by Yat-hung Leung 梁逸鴻

The Poetics of the Body in Islamic Mysticism
by Katharine Loevy

Stoics and Daoists on Freedom as Doing Necessary Things
by David Machek

No-Self in Sām. khya: A Comparative Look at Classical Sām. khya and Theravāda Buddhism
by Douglas Osto

Transmitting the Sage’s “Heart” (I): Unsealing Moral Autonomy— Intellectual Intuition and Mou Zongsan’s Reconstruction of the “Continuity of the Way” (Daotong)
by Rafael Suter

Plus commentary and discussion, a featured review, print book reviews, books received, and online book reviews.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


PEW68_1COVER (2)About the Journal

Promoting academic literacy on non-Western traditions of philosophy, Philosophy East and West has for over half a century published the highest-quality scholarship that locates these cultures in their relationship to Anglo-American philosophy.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

The journal welcomes specialized articles in Asian philosophy and articles that seek to illuminate, in a comparative manner, the distinctive characteristics of the various philosophical traditions in the East and West. See the submission guidelines here.

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society – Volume 10:2 (2017)

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society (JSEALS) recently published three new articles online as part of volume 10, number 2 (2017):

In addition, the editors provided a Book Notice: A Grammar Of Papuan Malay.

JSEALS is a peer-reviewed, open-access, electronic journal. All journal content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license. Sponsor: Southeast Asian Linguistics Society